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Host-Pathogen Interaction and Human Disease (Part 2) by Stanley Falkow, Ph.D.




























Stanley Falkow, Professor Microbiology and Immunology, Geographic Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Stanford University School of Medicine, presents the second part of a lecture on host-pathogen interaction. This one focuses on H. pylori (the ulcer bacterium) and the story behind its discovery by Australian pathologist Robin Warren and Australian physician Barry Marshall which won the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2005.

"Helicobacter pylori lives in the human stomach. It causes gastritis, ulcer disease and even gastric cancer. Some H. pylori can inject a protein, CagA, into gastric epithelial cells. CagA interacts with the tight junctions that bind cells together and with signaling molecules affecting motility and proliferation. CagA is associated with ulcer disease and cancer but we don't understand how it works to favor malignancy. Not long ago in history most humans carried H. pylori ; the incidence of carriage and gastric cancer is dropping but there is evidence that this microbe also had a protective effect on human health." Written by video_collector on SciVee.tv
 
 

Comments (2)

  1. This is the second of Dr. Falkow's excellent lectures on Host-Pathogen Interactions. If you are interested in how microbes can trigger cancer this again is a must view. In this video Dr. Falkow presents our current understanding of the association of CagA, synthesized by some Helicobacter, can interact with the tight junctions of the eukarytoic cells resulting in changes in signaling and motility of those cells in a very approachable format.
  2. I'm glad you enjoyed the Falkow lecture.
 

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