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TWiP 17 Letters

Bjorn writes:

Hi Vincent and Dickson,

I want to correct a statement you made in the trypanosomes episode. Apolipoprotein L-I in human blood kills only the subspecies Trypanosoma brucei brucei, whereas the East African subspecies Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and the West African subspecies Trypanosoma brucei gambiense have evolved mechanisms to escape the lytic Apolipoprotein. This means human infections with these two forms, if untreated, are always lethal. The good news is that through efforts spearheaded by the WHO the number of estimated infected persons has been reduced to about 60.000 per year [WHO 2006].

Thanks for your edutainment-podcasts,

Björn from Germany

Thomas writes:

Greetings Professors:

I originally got hooked on your show after discovering the treasures that awaited me in iTunes Podcasts, specifically Quackcast {Dr. Crislip whose droll sense of humor is quite like mine]. Eventually I discovered TWIP then as an added prize, TWIV. Since I am 71, I have seen the whole practice and concept of medicine change radically, as has almost everything else, in my lifetime. I always had an interest in medicine and back in the '70s even did medical histories for a "Free Clinic" run by volunteers varying in education from MDs to interested amateurs, like myself.

I have been watching the TV show that Prof. Despommier works for as a consultant [Monsters Inside Me]. Unfortunately the show reminds me all too often how so many of the people featured could have saved themselves a lot of time and discomfort if the physicians they dealt with had taken the time to take a medical history at the outset. In fact, I think the first question any doctor should ask is "Have you traveled to a foreign country, and if yes, when?" Also while it may seem wise when you hear hoofbeats to think horses, not zebras, as someone who has visited Tanzania, I always consider zebras as well as horses.

Anyway, your show has allowed me through listening to the same shows many times, to absorb some of the new concepts current in medicine today. Even though my mind is a poor shadow of what it was in my youth, I am still able to learn, just at a slower pace. I recently considered purchasing Mandell's two volume tome on Infectious Diseases. I put it in my my Amazon "shopping cart" where it sat while I gave some serious thought to whether I wanted to spend almost $350 to purchase it. I finally decided not to but found to my ultimate pleasure, that an Amazon "shopping cart" that has something in it and isn't acted upon in a reasonable time activates itself. I am glad it did as I am really enjoying reading it on-line and in the printed version. On-line access and "search" is an added feature if you purchase the book[s]. I think back to when I was a youth and there was a book Dickson might recall as he is advanced enough in years, titled "Not As A Stranger", an interesting novel that fascinated me as it was centered on the education that lead to acquiring an MD degree. How things have changed :-) I had an older copy of Mandell's [sic?] book on Infectious Disease dating back to the early 1980's and it amazes me how so completely a different approach their is to infectious diseases due to our current knowledge and emphasis on both evolution and genetics.

Anyway, continue with the great shows and realize your audience may extend beyond the boundaries of listeners you might have thought interested in it.

Thomas (flickr.com/photos/tbr18)

Dan writes:

Dear Vincent and Dick,

First, let me say that your podcast is fantastic, very informative, and enjoyable to listen to in the mornings during my commute. The reason I am contacting you both is actually less about the podcast itself, and more in regards to the subject matter, or, how one gets into it. I recently finished my undergraduate degree and am interested in going off to public health school in a few years. I've been interested in the infectious disease aspect of community/international health for a while now, and most of my undergraduate degree focused on medical anthropology and infectious diseases (basic biostatistics, ecology courses, a survey of infectious disease biology, and a class on disease ecology). I've been thinking about the graduate school path, and I know that the spectrum of eukaryotic parasites, particularly the protozoan-caused diseases, are what I would like to focus on. However, as most masters programs don't seem to have a particular "parasitology" concentration (with the exception of Tulane's MSPH...), I was curious what advice you two may have for someone interested in entering the field. Go into epidemiology? Environmental health? Population biology?

Any advice will be much appreciated! Thank you for your time,

Dan

Scotty wrote:

Thought you guys might get a kick out of this:

Why Captain Higgins is my favorite parasitic flatworm

Dicrocoelium dendriticum, I salute you.

Scotty

 

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