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TWiM 79 Letters

Matthew writes:

Dear Doctors,

After listening to the second portion of TWiM 78, talking about the presence of gram-negative nosocomials around Brooklyn, I noticed a several people wearing scrubs while at lunch near a hospital in Houston, TX. Then a thought occured to me; disease! Disease everywhere! Might part of the problem, if these microbes are moving out from the hospital, be that they're carried from a day's worn clothes? I realize I'm asking to speculate, but think this might be a good consideration for hospital policy. Houston is currently 27 C at a low 50% humidity.

Matthew Folts

P.S. I finished my sandwich. It was a pastrami ruben.

Jim writes:
Hi Folks,

"Ideas" with Paul Kennedy on the Canadian Broadcast Corp site recently ran a 54 min program about invasive species that included a short reference to rock snot. At the link find the title, "Bioinvasion: Attack of the Alien Species!," right-click (here or there) "Download Bioinvasion: Attack of the Alien Species!" to download it. I thought it, along with Prof Schmidt's comment about furry teeth, are a good intro to any program for kids about bio-films.

Jim
Smithfield, VA

Peter writes:

You have spoken before on TWiM about the potential risks of triclosan-resistant pathogens developing through its over use.

A recent open-access article from the the University of Michigan, published in mBio, looks like it may be worth a mention. The researchers conducted a study that examined the nasal passages of healthy adults, 41% of those sampled had traces of triclosan in their nasal secretions and the presence of triclosan in the secretions also correlated positively with nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus.

When grown in the presence of triclosan, Staphylococcus aureus was was found to be better able to attach to human proteins.

Additional experiments found that that rats exposed to triclosan were also more susceptible to nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus.

http://mbio.asm.org/content/5/2/e01015-13

 

 

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