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TWiM #74: It came from the Siberian permafrost

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloElio Schaechter, and Michael Schmidt

Vincent, Elio, and Michael discuss a huge 30,000 year old virus recovered from Siberia, and nested symbiosis facilitated by horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to insect. giant virus

Right click to download TWiM#74 (51 MB .mp3, 70 minutes).

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Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.

 

Comments (1)

  1. Dear Vincent, Elio, and Michael: It's good to hear you all together---truly a type of "quorum sensing" phenomenon of Overwhelming Microbial Goodness ("OMG"), which I have come to expect from TWiM. As always, a wonderful and informative show. Elio was kind enough to mention my "microbiology" inspired buttons. I make the buttons and T-shirts for my microbiology classes each year, as part of my propaganda program to promote Microbial Supremacy. Anyway, Elio likes a old one from years ago. Here is what he was discussing: http://www.cafepress.com/microbesrule/7034973 I am reminded of Thomas Miller's great maxim: "All organisms are nothing but a bag of other organisms walking around." Organelles are just the evolutionary end product of lazy microbes, perhaps! Dr. Miller, by the way, studies using bacterial symbionts of insects as a form of pest control---something called paratransgenic control. A similar approach is being used to reduce dengue fever transmission by mosquitoes. So the study of unusual symbionts of aphids could be useful in unexpected ways. Thanks again for your great show. Best wishes, and I hope to see you at ASM in Boston. -Mark Martin

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