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TWiM 47 Letters

Maureen writes:

I love all your series (TWIM,TWIV, and TWIP) and learn immensely from them. I am a Clinical Research Nurse and work at NIH in the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) unit that houses the KPCR  patients that you may have recently read about.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/superbug-stalked-nih-hospital-last-year-killing-six/2012/08/22/5be18b1a-ec66-11e1-9ddc-340d5efb1e9c_story.html

I'd like to hear a discussion about this isolate as you educate everyone so thoroughly. Our hospital has worked diligently to track and eliminate this organism from our hospital and we've just about succeeded but I'd still like to be better informed about KPCR. Thanks.

http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/4/148/148ra116.full

P.S. Please Please Please start a TWIB!! We work with so much that I still need to be educated about various bacteria.

Thanks immensely for all the education you give us.

Jim writes:

Hi Vincent and Friends,

Thank you very much for the informative and often imaginative discussions that take place in TWiM. It's a real pleasure to listen to such a quality, fun, easily accessible (and free!) source of microbial material. I'm sure you are often thanked for taking the effort to put it out there, but I wanted to add my voice. As a cell and molecular biology student it offers some wonderful connections and points of interest to my education.

My question relates to a recently published book by Trudy M. Wassenaar that I have been reading, titled "Bacteria: The Benign, the Bad, and the Beautiful." Has anyone read this book, and if so what are their thoughts on it? I would recommend it to those with a broad interest, or who need an introduction, like students such Pokies as myself. It offers an incredibly interesting and diverse description of bacteria and is easy to understand. I actually picked it up because it was recommended by the google+ "Microbiology" account (https://plus.google.com/u/0/109102265263486263584/posts).

Thanks again, and warm regards.

Steve writes:

TWiM Audio File with Interactive Transcription

Here is a link to a partial, video I created from the TWiM 06 audio file: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtOXD_X6g_w. I created a video file from the audio file so that I could use the YouTube captioning tool to import an interactive transcript -- minutes five (5) through twelve (12). I created the time-coded transcript using an online tool called Subtitle-Horse, (http://subtitle-horse.com).

If you click the interactive transcript button on the button-bar (Like, Dislike, Add to, etc) just below the video player, you can see how the transcript works. The transcript is indexed, time coded to the audio.

Potential Benefit of Interactive Transcription

The time-coded transcript text could be parsed and placed in a database for easy query. Then all included audio/video files are text searchable and associated to the segment of the source audio/video clip.

Collaborative Transcription

On TWiV a number of people have completed or are working on transcripts. In my experience, transcription is a time intensive process. To lighten individual time commitment, it would be nice to get several people to work collaboratively to transcribe one TWiV audio/video. Although far from perfect, the subtitle-horse online transcription tool could be used for this.

Volunteer to Help Transcribe

As a first step, if interested, I’d be interested in coordinating a collaborative transcription of a TWiV session with one to three others.
 

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