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TWiM 22 Letters

Jim writes:

I'm greatly concerned about the harmful effects of nanotechnology. I'm old, but have grand kids, who already have to live with all kinds of junk in the environment. I guess it's a topic that fits in the virology category, too, since are not nanotech-sized particles in the viroid category? The scope of nanotechnology is so great that it looks like a wave of change, just like plastics, so perhaps it has to become an obvious and terrible hazard, like DDT or an epidemic before better controls will be considered. Just thought I'd ask what your take is on the topic.

I ran across a nice 3-part series from Marcy of 2010, if you want to use it as Buy Levitra a springboard, or reference for listeners, although plenty of other discussion is easily found on the web.

Part 1: http://www.aolnews.com/2010/03/24/amid-nanotechs-dazzling-promise-health-risks-grow/

Part 2: http://www.aolnews.com/2010/03/24/regulated-or-not-nano-foods-coming-to-a-store-near-you/

Part 3: http://www.aolnews.com/2010/03/24/obsession-with-nanotech-growth-stymies-regulators/


Jim
Smithfield, VA

Richard writes:

Hi Vincent and hosts,

I have a theory, as to why mitochondria would be involved in programmed cell death. It makes sense that, if they are descended from parasitic bacteria, that mitochondria would have had the ability to kill cells. They may well have needed this in order to spread, from cell to cell.

It makes sense that evolution would adopt something already present, in order to kill cells, rather than inventing something new.

I have no proof, but it does seem reasonable.

Thanks as always, for your interesting group of podcasts.

Regards

Richard

 

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