MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

ASM Fellowships

Fellowship

Microbes After Hours

WaterSupplyYouTubeFrame

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Featured Image

Featured Video

Ebola Virus explained

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Carl Zimmer - Comments

I completely agree with Troy's rational arguments against genital mutilation in infants.
Anytime I read a circumcision response containing the word "mutilate", I quit reading, because I know it's going to be "another one of those". There are cogent arguments on each side (excluding religious reasons, which are pretty much incapable of argument, either way), but I, for one, am circumcised and surely don't consider myself "mutilated". mu·ti·late (mytl-t) tr.v. mu·ti·lat·ed, mu·ti·lat·ing, mu·ti·lates 1. To deprive of a limb or an essential part; cripple. 2. To disfigure by damaging irreparably: mutilate a statue. See Synonyms at batter1. 3. To make imperfect by excising or altering parts. Perhaps I am 'imperfect', lol, but haven't had too many complaints . . .
So glad I found this! There isn't a lot of information about this on the net. Bookmarking the additional readings for later. Love the mp3 as well! Oakland DentistSan Francisco Plumber
A nice piece of work if they can make it economically practical, but be forewarned - isobutyraldehyde has a pungent odor, is an irritant to the eyes and lungs, and with oxidation is readily contaminated by isobutyric acid, which smells pretty much like essence of vomit. Isn't that also basically true of Vegemite? | Term Papers
Also see the Current Topics piece in the March issue of Microbe magazine (URL below): http://www.microbemagazine.org/index.php/03-2010-current-topics/1423-losses-in-ancestral-microbes-pose-health-risks-to-humans There's an accompanying interview.
Dr. Bamforth is the Anheuser-Busch Edowed Professor, selected after an international search, specializing in the science of malting and brewing. His current research program focuses primarily on the wholesomeness of beer, including studies on the psychophysics of beer perception, on polyphenols and on the residues from non-starchy polysaccharide
Hi Andrew. We have actually just fixed this as of this weekend. Please let me know if you don't see any improvement. You can also try to unsubscribe and resubscribe in iTunes to see if that helps as well. Thanks for the feedback.
hello I enjoy these podcasts, when I can download them; some of them seem to download impossibly slowly - this is one of them ; please can you look into this; look forward to listening; thanks, Andrew
This is an incredibly frank and lucid discussion of the past and current vaccine program for malaria. Professor Sherman has devoted his research career to malaria and is unafraid to critically assess the current lack of balance in dealing with control of malaria.
Dr. Worobey mentioned routine male neonatal circumcision "overall reduces the transmission of the virus quite a lot." I think his information was mixed with promoting safer sex practices; like condom use which squash ANY insignificant benefit that routinely mutilating either sex before an age of conscious consent would bring. If not having a foreskin had ANY benefit to mammals of ANY kind we would see more then two species of mammals without them.
Good idea Don. I added the title and link to her book on Amazon in the post itself.
It is always so refreshing to hear a scientist say that they don't understand how something works, yet! Perhaps you should put the name of her new children's book in the printed section somewhere - Living Sunlight: How Plants Bring The Earth To Life
Thanks, Bob. I write a little about Bray's work in my book Microcosm. I hadn't spoken to him before; it was great to really plunge into the research.
This is a fascinating podcast. Prof. Bray game an enormous amount of information. I wonder if he covered his whole book. This must have terrific for you, Carl, since he talked about E. coli.

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use