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Ebola Virus explained

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profvrr - Comments

Sorry, John, we won't be at ASP this year.
Thanks for the explanation, Katja! Glad you enjoyed our telling of your story.
This headline is terribly misleading; in fact it is completely wrong and I predicted such headlines would issue when I first saw the letter about gain of function research. The investigators are not at all trying to create a deadly version of H7N9 virus; they are trying to give the virus new properties so they can understand what changes might alter the virus to make it evade immunity, antiviral drugs, and so on. For more information see: http://www.virology.ws/2013/08/07/virologists-plan-influenza-h7n9-gain-of-function-experiments/
The amoeba is Naegleria fowlerii and we discussed the infections of this type on TWiP #39: http://www.microbeworld.org/podcasts/this-week-in-parasitism/archives/1185-twip-39-i-encyst-said-the-amoeba
Beautiful job editing, Ray! And great job Ray and Chris on the cameras.
The correct spelling is 'clathrin'.
Dutch researchers did *not* create 'an even more deadly strain of the virus in a laboratory'. They produced a strain of the H5N1 virus that transmits in the air among ferrets. This virus is much *less* deadly than the parental virus. Furthermore, Lipsitch is completely wrong in stating that 'If you make a strain that’s highly transmissible between humans, as the Dutch team did....." The Dutch team did *not* make a strain that can be transmitted among humans. Why is the H5N1 story filled with incorrect statements and wrong assumptions? It is our job as microbiologists to inform the public of what actually happened, and articles such as this one do a distinct disservice.
I guess this supports my belief that viruses are not alive. Because poliovirus has been made from 'off-the-shelf-chemicals': see Link Texthttp://www.virology.ws/2009/11/18/viruses-and-journalism-off-the-shelf-chemicals/
Sorry about the link error, Liesbeth it's fixed now.
The headline should read 'that might be responsible'. As the authors themselves write, they haven't proven that these viruses cause IBD in snakes.
I agree, Liesbeth! Some day!
I can't believe anyone would rate this performance other than 5 stars. Whether or not you like the music, you have to give 8 scientists a lot of credit for getting up in front of a crowd and performing - not giving a talk but playing music.
Love it!
Garth, the H5N1 fatality rate is *not* 60% as you cite above. There is serological evidence that many individuals are infected with mild or no symptoms, which would bring the fatality rate below 1%. Please see http://www.virology.ws/2012/01/25/h5n1-facts-not-fear/ for more information on this. We need to stop citing this incorrect rate as it is driving the controversy over publication of H5N1 results.
TWiP #33 is unusually popular - I wonder why?
I think it's a great idea to check facts in science-related stories; I cannot understand why the writers are so opposed to this practice. I checked Rebecca Skloot's 'Immortal Life' in this way and I am sure she is grateful. I've also done it for Trine, as we reveal in TWiV 149.
They did not find Hendra virus in the dog - they find antibodies that react with the virus. This may indicate previous infection with Hendra virus or a related virus.
Make that TWiM #8!
See TWiM #9 - Live in NOLA - for more on this from Nicole Dubilier, who also works on the symbiosis between mouthless worms and bacteria.
Indeed, the empowerment of the internet for scientists is quite well known - it allows us to reach many more people than we ever have in our careers. Many scientists are blogging and podcasting and reaching new audiences, which appreciate the direct contact. This is why we just passed one million downloads on TWiV. It would be useful to emphasize such success stories as examples of what scientists can be doing.
Hello Twisted Bacteria - you should have come up afterwards and said hello. Would have loved to meet you. Thanks for coming - Vincent.
I am always curious about why someone would vote a TWiV episode only one star. If you have a specific problem with the episode, please leave a comment so that we can improve it in future episodes.
Good to hear that. We'll have her back for a general TWiV discussion.
Let's not forget that Dr. Shenk was instrumental in bringing TWiV to microbeworld.org. Which then lead to TWiP.
We answered this in TWiP 9. According to Dickson: none.
Miso, thanks for your comments. Glad you liked this slightly different episode. We'll aim to do the same with TWiV. As for TWiB - stay tuned; it's in the planning stages.
This is a colossal waste of money, given that there are many free tools available on the web that enable social interaction among scientists. The funds would have been far better spent supporting the research of new scientists.
This Week in Virology #59 featured a discussion of the Argentine story with the authors, Gustavo Palacios and Mady Hornig. Check it out at http://www.twiv.tv/2009/11/22/twiv-59-dog-bites-virus/
A better article on this issue can be found at http://www.virology.ws/2009/11/24/the-d225g-change-in-2009-h1n1-influenza-virus-is-not-a-concern/. No one seems to be mentioning the fact that D225G also severely impairs transmission of H1N1 viruses in ferrets.

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