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Mycobacterium smegmatis

Streak plate of Mycobacterium smegmatis grown on TSA for 96 hrs. Read More

Physarum polycephalum

Physarum polycephalum, slime mold, grown in a large perti plate on moist paper towels using oatmeal as the food source. Culture was grown in the dark at room temperature. The paper towel was moistened every day with tap water. After 3 week’s the culture formed sporangia (fruiting bodies). Im... Read More

ICAAC 2014 - How Quickly Viruses Can Contaminate a Building

Using tracer viruses, researche... Read More

Finally, Clothing Designed to Stop the Spread of Germs on Public Transit

Of all the public transit etiquette violations out there, the sneeze-and-touch at the height of cold and flu season is among the worst. Everyone who rides in a city has seen it: that sickly looking person across the train or bus who sneezes into a free hand then grabs the pole we all share. Rese... Read More

TWiV 281: The Salk legacy with Peter L. Salk

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Host: Vincent Racaniello


Guest: Peter L. Salk


Vincent meets up with Peter L. Salk to talk about development ... Read More

Adoption of the fist bump as a greeting could substantially reduce the transmission of infectious disease between individuals

Could a fist bump be a cleaner, better way for people to greet each other, especially in germy hospitals? British researchers have done an experiment that seems to say yes.

They tested just how many bacteria are transferred hand to hand during a handshake, a high-five and a fist bump. Handsha... Read More

Antibiotic developed 50 years ago may be the key to fighting ‘superbugs’

Scientists at the University at Buffalo are turning to an old class of antibiotics to fight new superbugs resistant to modern medicine.

A $4.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will allow UB researchers to develop new dosing regimens for polymyxin antibiotics.

Developed ... Read More

Catheter Innovation Destroys Dangerous Biofilms

For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras everywhere.

About half of ... Read More

TWiV 257: Caveat mTOR

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Hosts: Vincent RacanielloDickson Despommier Read More

TB bacteria mask their identity to intrude into deeper regions of lungs

TB-causing bacteria appear to mask their identity to avoid recognition by infection-killing cells in the upper airways. The bacteria call up more permissive white blood cells in the deeper regions of the lungs and hitch a ride inside them to get into the host’s body.

These findings are report... Read More

TWiV 265: This year in virology

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove Read More

Should variola virus, the agent of smallpox, be destroyed?

Later this month (May 2014) the World Health Assembly will decide whether to destroy the remaining stocks of variola virus – the agent of smallpox – or to allow continued research on the virus at WHO-approved laboratories. We are interested in your opinion on this issue. Please follow the link t... Read More

Canadian man in hospital with Ebola-like virus

A man is in hospital in Canada with symptoms of a haemorrhagic fever resembling the Ebola virus, a health official has said.

The man had recently returned from Liberia in the west African region, currently suffering a deadly outbreak of an unidentified haemorrhagic fever.

He is in isolatio... Read More

I had the bacteria in my gut analysed. And this may be the future of medicine

Andrew Anthony sent his stool off to have its bacteria sequenced. In the future, such techniques could help assess our susceptibility to conditions from diabetes, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's to autism, depression and cancer.

Click on 'source' to read more. Read More

TWiP 66 letters

 


Andre writes:


Dear Vincent,


To my great delight, I just discovered your podcasts twiv, twim and twip.


The first twip I heard, about Strongyloides stercoralis, although informative and interesting, seemed to have several inaccuracies. I w... Read More

TWiP 62 letters

 


Blaine writes:


Hi Twippies,


I saw today in the New York Times that a hookworm vaccine will be tested in Gabon. I found this very intriguing as your discussions of parasitic worms have rarely included the possibility of vaccines. Can you please c... Read More

Algae able to switch quantum coherence on and off

A UNSW-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis.

The function in the algae of this quantum effect, known as coherence, remains a mystery, but it is thoug... Read More

E.coli on MacConkey Agar (Mac)

Streak plate isolation of E. coli on MacConkey Agar grown for 24 hrs at 37 degrees. E. coli demonstrates strong lactose fermentation indicated by the bright pink halo, bile precipitant around the colonies, and pink colony growth. Read More

Antibiotics In Manure Implicated In Human Pathogenic Bacteria In Soil

Researchers have have found that the repeated application of manure contaminated with antibiotics changes the composition of bacteria in the soil.

The focus of the investigation was on sulfadiazine (SDZ), a widely used antibiotic in animal husbandry which enters the soil via manure. The rese... Read More

ASM GM 2014 - Where Pathogens Can Linger on Airplanes

Many air travelers are concerned about the risks of catching a disease from other passengers given the long time spent in crowded air cabins. New research shows disease-causing bacteria can linger on surfaces commonly found in airplane cabins for days, even up to a week. Participants discuss ... Read More

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