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Dolphin-killing virus reaches Florida, and is infecting whales, too

The bottlenose dolphin die-off that began in July has been traveling steadily south with migrating Atlantic herds, and now diseased and dead dolphins are turning up in Florida. The culprit, a measles-like virus, has claimed 753 victims and counting, making this the worst outbreak ever recorded. ... Read More

Babies' Weak Immune Systems Let In "Good" Bacteria

As any new parent knows, infants are notoriously susceptible to bacterial infections. A study now suggests that the body engineers this vulnerability deliberately, allowing beneficial microbes to colonize the baby’s gut, skin, mouth and lungs. Learning to manipulate this system could lead to tre... Read More

Tracing Arthritis to Bugs in the Gut?

The inflamed joints and systemic inflammation characteristic of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been linked with an altered pattern of gut microbial colonization, suggesting a new explanation for autoimmunity and having potential implications for treatment, researchers reported.

Using sh... Read More

Bacterial toxin sets the course for infection

Braunschweig have now discovered what makes a specific strain of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis—one of the main instigators for these infections–so dangerous: the bacteria produce a molecule called CNFy that facilitates the infection process for them. It changes the host cells in a manner that enab... Read More

Scientists find some bacteria may thrive in zero gravity

As if space wasn’t already dangerous enough, some newly reported research on bacterial growth in orbit indicates some strains of microorganisms can thrive in zero gravity, even if they are deprived of nutrients. This could change the way astronauts prepare for and live in space, especially as th... Read More

Dolphin virus outbreak in Atlantic is deadliest ever

The deadliest known outbreak of a measles-like virus in bottlenose dolphins has killed a record number of the animals along the US Atlantic coast since July, officials said Friday.

Click on 'source' to read more Read More

Cancer-Causing HPV Virus Directly Damages DNA

Human papillomavirus (HPV) can damage chromosomes and genes directly, researchers report in a new study. HPV is a virus that can cause anal, cervical, head and neck cancers, and according to experts, it produces two viral proteins (E6 and E7) that are involved in the development of those diseas... Read More

Gene Is Linked to Deadly Runaway Fungal Infection

For most people, a fungal infection like athlete's foot means a simple trip to the drugstore and a reminder to bring shower shoes to the gym. But in very rare cases, fungal infections can spread below the skin's surface and onto the lymph nodes, bones, digestive tract or even the brain. Research... Read More

Pathologist wins Packard Foundation Fellowship for research into 'good' bacteria

Bacteria have a bad reputation, but University of Utah pathologist June L. Round, Ph.D., likes to look at their good side–and for the second time this year she's received a prestigious national award to aid her research into bacteria that actually are good for human health.

Click on 'source' ... Read More

Rare New Microbe Found in Two Distant NASA Clean Rooms

A rare, recently discovered microbe that survives on very little to eat has been found in two places on Earth: spacecraft clean rooms in Florida and South America.

Microbiologists often do thorough surveys of bacteria and other microbes in spacecraft clean rooms. Fewer microbes live there tha... Read More

Hey, bacteria are individuals too

Each person carries 10 times as many bacterial cells as human cells, the former of which have continued to evolve in response to medicine's most potent antibiotics. But microscopic bugs don't just dictate human health—they're also integral to the health of every body of water on the planet. Acco... Read More

Germs and bacteria beautified in Invisible Portraits

Through high-tech images of microbial life, the Beaty Biodiversity Museum will gross you out and make you want to wash your hands.

Nevertheless, the museum’s current art exhibition, entitled Invisible Portraits, will entice you regardless of whether you are in Science or Arts. The exhibit dis... Read More

HIV ‘invisibility cloak’ allows virus to evade immune system

In a study published in Nature, the team from University College London and the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology explains how HIV uses molecules inside host cells in an infected person to avoid alerting the body’s innate immune system (IIS) – cells and mechanisms that for... Read More

Unnecessary TB deaths to be thing of the past thanks to new mobile drug resistance test device

Thousands of deaths from tuberculosis (or TB), an infectious bacterial disease, could be prevented using a new hand-held device that is being developed to detect potentially fatal drug resistance in less than 15 minutes.

Currently neither the TB infection itself, nor those people with strains... Read More

New antifungal composition effectively inhibits a wide variety of fungi

In order to overcome resistance to antifungal variety of pathogenic fungi and yeast, researchers from the University of Alicante have developed a novel and efficient antifungal composition with pharmacological applications in agriculture and food industry, among others.

The composition, deve... Read More

Japanese superfood prevents flu infection

Scientists have discovered that bacteria found in a traditional Japanese pickle can prevent flu. Could this be the next superfood?

The research, which assesses the immune-boosting powers of Lactobacillus brevis from Suguki – a pickled turnip, popular in Japan – in mice that have been exposed ... Read More

Alga takes first evolutionary leap to multicellularity

A single-celled alga has evolved a crude form of multicellularity in the lab – a configuration it never adopts in nature – giving researchers a chance to replay one of life's most important evolutionary leaps in real time.

This is the second time researchers have coaxed a single-celled organi... Read More

Study uncovers new explanation for infection susceptibility in newborns

Cells that allow helpful bacteria to safely colonize the intestines of newborn infants also suppress their immune systems to make them more vulnerable to infections, according to new research in Nature.

Published online Nov. 6, the study could prompt a major shift in how medicine views the th... Read More

Yeast Meets West: Yeast Cultivation (video)

In honor of the Bay Area Science Festival, a group of passionate microbrewers, scientists, and yeast cultivators make 3 original brews to compete in a blind tasting at Nerd Nite in San Francisco, California.

Want to learn more about the microbes involved in brewing? Please check out the Micro... Read More

Exploring The Invisible Universe That Lives On Us — And In Us (cool NPR animated video)

The next time you look in a mirror, think about this: In many ways you're more microbe than human. There are 10 times more cells from microorganisms like bacteria and fungi in and on our bodies than there are human cells.

Scientists increasingly think that these microorganisms have a huge inf... Read More

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