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UC Riverside research has large implications for controlling insect-born diseases worldwide

Insects are repelled by N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide, also known as DEET. But exactly which olfactory receptors insects use to sense DEET has eluded scientists for long.

Now researchers at the University of California, Riverside have identified these DEET-detecting olfactory receptors that cause ... Read More

Key Mechanism Behind Herpes Revealed

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have for the first time managed to measure the internal pressure that enables the herpes virus to infect cells in the human body. The discovery paves the way for the development of new medicines to combat viral infections. The results indicate good chance... Read More

Spectacular Microscopic Art Is Also World-Changing Science

Fernan Federici’s microscopic images of plants, bacteria, and crystals are a classic example of finding art in unexpected places.

A couple years ago, Federici was working on his Ph.D. in biological sciences at Cambridge University studying self-organization, the process by which things organi... Read More

A microbe's fountain of youth

The yeast S.pombe is one of the best-studied microbes in the world. First isolated from East African millet beer over a century ago, it's been used as a model organism in molecular and cell biology for the past sixty years. And yet scientists have now just uncovered what may be its most striking... Read More

Scientists Discuss The Reality Of A Zombie Apocalypse: Exclusive

Hollywood has amplified the idea of a zombie apocalypse for a long time, and the stories have grown increasingly popular in pop culture, particularly due to TV shows like ‘The Walking Dead‘ and movies like ‘World War Z.’

However, when you take science fiction out of the equation and add real-... Read More

Poop pill may treat stubborn, deadly C. diff bacteria

Transplanting fecal matter has been one of the best remedies at treating a tough bacterial infection known as Clostridium difficile (C. diff). Scientists are now saying they can give all the benefits of poop in a tiny pill.

This new pill method is a less yucky way to do "fecal transplants." A... Read More

Some Observations on the Transformation of Self

Artist Anne Brodie, Microbiologist Dr Simon Park and Curator Dr Caterina Albano collaborated in researching the communication and light producing properties of bioluminescent bacteria outside of the usual confines of pure scientific practice. Over the course of 2009 and 2010 we developed a body ... Read More

Some Observations on the Transformation of Self

Artist Anne Brodie, Microbiologist Dr Simon Park and Curator Dr Caterina Albano collaborated in researching the communication and light producing properties of bioluminescent bacteria outside of the usual confines of pure scientific practice. Over the course of 2009 and 2010 we developed a body ... Read More

Media. Green and blue water colour and Serratia marcescens (red)

This is a joint project with water color artist Sarah Roberts to study the interaction of bacteria with traditional water colors. Many different types of bacteria have been assessed but only two so far, can be said to paint. When the white pigmented bacterium Proteus mirabilis, and the red Serra... Read More

TWiM #65: Leanness is transmissible

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Michele Swanson.


Vincent and M... Read More

TWiM 65 Letters

Alexandra writes:


Dear TWIM-ers,


When I began listening to TWIV almost a year ago, I had just switched majors from philosophy to biology. I am now writing to you good people at TWIM at the end of my first undergraduate summer research gig, where I have had qui... Read More

Reducing assembly complexity of microbial genomes with single-molecule sequencing

A new paper released in Genome Biology on September 13 from lead author Sergey Koren at the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center offers a thorough overview of Pacific Biosciences' SMRT® Sequencing for microbes, from per-genome cost to potential for assembling complete genomes.... Read More

Recruiting E. coli to combat hard-to-treat bacterial infections

The notorious bacteria E. coli is best known for making people sick, but scientists have reprogrammed the microbe — which also comes in harmless varieties — to make it seek out and fight other disease-causing pathogens. The researchers’ report appears in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology and de... Read More

TB vaccine developed at McMaster University

McMaster University researchers are about to launch Canada’s first tuberculosis (TB) vaccine clinical trial with a vaccine totally designed, manufactured and tested within McMaster.

"The exciting thing for McMaster is that this is translational research that has gone from the basic science wh... Read More

DOES DEADLY FROG FUNGUS LURK IN INSECTS?

An ancient skin fungus that has been killing frogs, salamanders, and other amphibians may be hiding in invertebrates such as insects.

The skin fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), also known as amphibian chytrid, got attention in 1993 when dead and dying frogs began turning up in Quee... Read More

Antarctica's Salt-Loving Microbes Swap DNA

Microbes living in Antarctica's saltiest lake swap huge chunks of genetic material as a means of surviving their harsh environment, a new study finds.

The single-celled organisms, called haloarchaea for their salt-loving ways, are biologically distinct from bacteria, algae and other tiny crea... Read More

Science Take: Bacteria's Private Line

The first of New York Times new Science Take series examines how a kind of bacteria can organize coordinated, wavelike attacks on prey using a stealth communication system.

Click "source" to VIEW VIDEO. Read More

My Dishwasher Is Trying to Kill Me: Extreme Conditions Suit Pathogenic Fungus

A potentially pathogenic fungus has found a home living in extreme conditions in some of the most common household appliances, researchers have found. A new paper published in the British Mycological Society journal, Fungal Biology, published by Elsevier, shows that these sites make perfect habi... Read More

Plasmas attack bacterial cells on several levels

As they destroy bacteria very efficiently, plasmas constitute an alternative to chemical disinfectants and potentially to antibiotics, as well. How they achieve this effect has been investigated by biologists, plasma physicists and chemists at the Ruhr-Universität (RUB). Cold atmospheric-pressur... Read More

Legionella bacteria found in compost products

A study conducted at the University of Strathclyde investigating the presence of Legionella in compost, has found that the bacteria exist in a significant number of commercial products.

The research, the first substantial analysis of Legionella in UK composts, suggests that the bacteria are a... Read More

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