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Unknown on palm of hand print

Unknown organism seen on the palm of a hand print. Organism was a light mat yellow color with a mounding/rhizoid growth. Organism grew up (3-D)c forming what looked like a basket. Plate were TSA incubated for 24 hrs at 37 degree's C, then 3 days at room temp and held at refrigerated temperat... Read More

PGPR under Biotic & Abiotic

Pseudomonas spp. isolate producing Hydrogen Cyanide under drought stress and is inhibiting Fusarium oxysporium under drought stress condition. Read More

Unknown Organism on handprint

Unknown organism, possible Bacillus spp, seen on finger of a hand print done on a 4th grade class. TSA plates incubated at 37 degree's C for 24 hrs, left at room temp for 3 days then held at refrigerated temperatures. Read More

Vaccinations are more effective when administered in the morning

New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that flu vaccinations are more effective when administered in the morning. Read More

Threat of novel swine flu viruses in pigs and humans

The wide diversity of flu in pigs across multiple continents, mostly introduced from humans, highlights the significant potential of new swine flu strains emerging, according to a study to be published in eLife. Read More

Zika virus in 3D

On this space-filling image of the Zika virus particle, you can clearly see the five, three, and two-fold axes of symmetry formed by the viral E glycoprotein. Viral glycoproteins, which are embedded in membranes, are typically not ordered in this way - exceptions include flaviviruses and togavir... Read More

MMP #12: Hydrogen from ground rocks can furnish microbial ecosystems with energy to drive growth.

Host: Jeff Fox with special guest, Jon Telling.


Jon Telling of Bristol University in Bristol, United Kingdom talks with Jeff Fox about his findings suggesting that the grinding of glaciers over rocks can liberate hydrogen, which, in turn, drives the growth of methanogens within microb... Read More

Stilton Cheese, Alexis de Toqueville, and turning ASM into the Tesla of Scientific Societies

“Stefano, you seem like a smart person. Can I ask you why you decided to take a job with a scientific society?” I had just helped myself to a slice of a very sharp Stilton cheese, after a wonderful dinner supported by wonderful wine. All of a sudden the Stilton seemed even sharper. The question ... Read More

Labyrinthulids

Labyrinthulids or commonly known as Slime nets are group of protists of the Class Labyrinthulomycota. These organisms form tube-like structures or filaments (forming a complex net) that serve as tracks where cells glide. They are commonly isolated from seagrass and fallen senescent mangrove lea... Read More

How Vibrio cholerae is attracted by bile revealed

A group of researchers from Osaka University, Hosei University, and Nagoya University have revealed the molecular mechanism that Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, is attracted by bile. This group has also successfully detected the ligand binding to the bacteria chemoreceptor in ... Read More

Cellphone-sized device quickly detects the Ebola virus

The worst of the recent Ebola epidemic is over, but the threat of future outbreaks lingers. Monitoring the virus requires laboratories with trained personnel, which limits how rapidly tests can be done. Now scientists report in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry a handheld instrument that detects... Read More

Going All #MicroWarhol

I simply couldn't help myself. I snapped a photograph of a soup can surrounded by plus "Giant Microbes" (giantmicrobes.com) and gave it the Andy Warhol treatment via https://bighugelabs.com/popart.php.

Voila! Microbial Pop Art! Read More

The gold standard method for diagnosing T. vaginalis- Broth culture

After 3 days of incubation in Trichomonas broth at 37 C degrees . Easily seen under 40x microscope, protozoa flagellates . Clinical sample was vaginal secretions . Read More

A Microbial Ocean Feast: Who Ate What?

Single-celled organisms called bacterioplankton spend their lives drifting in open ocean, visible to the naked eye only en masse. But don't be fooled by their slight size: These minuscule critters play a hefty role in the carbon cycle. Heterotrophic microbes, by some estimates, process half of t... Read More

Immune Cell Products for Research

Astarte Biologics offers the largest selection of characterized immune cells along with cell pellets and lysates, antigens, purified LPS, sera, plasmas and Rheumera™ kits to aid in immune system research and discovery. All cells are of the highest quality and are guaranteed for purity, viability... Read More

Antibodies to dengue virus enhance infection by Zika virus

It has been speculated that the development of neurological disease and fetal abnormalities after Zika virus infection may be due to the presence of antibodies against other flaviruses that enhance disease. In support of this hypothesis, it has been shown that antibodies to dengue virus enhance... Read More

Assessing gram stain error rates

Because of its simplicity and the rapid time-to-result turnaround, gram staining plays an important role in clinical microbiology. Learning the cell structure helps eliminate potential disease etiologies: learning an isolate is a gram-negative rod doesn’t tell you what the diagnosis is, but it h... Read More

Researchers discover potential treatment for sepsis and other responses to infection

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai say that tiny doses of a cancer drug may stop the raging, uncontrollable immune response to infection that leads to sepsis and kills up to 500,000 people a year in the U.S. The new drug treatment may also benefit millions of people world... Read More

A 'tropical' parasitic disease emerges in the Canadian Arctic

Montreal, April 28, 2016 - An outbreak of an intestinal parasite common in the tropics, known as Cryptosporidium, has been identified for the first time in the Arctic. The discovery was made in Nunavik, Quebec, by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC... Read More
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