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Seals Brought Tuberculosis to Americas

Ancient bacterial genome sequences collected from human remains in Peru suggest that seals first gave tuberculosis (TB) to humans in the Americas.

Modern TB strains found in North and South America are closely related to strains from Europe, suggesting that the Spaniards introduced the diseas... Read More

Smart Bacteria Help Each Other Survive

The body’s assailants are cleverer than previously thought. New research from Lund University in Sweden shows for the first time how bacteria in the airways can help each other replenish vital iron. The bacteria thereby increase their chances of survival, which can happen at the expense of the p... Read More

Researchers uncover clues to flu’s mechanisms

A flu virus acts like a Trojan horse as it attacks and infects host cells. Scientists at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have acquired a clearer view of the well-hidden mechanism involved.

Their computer simulations may lead to new strategies to stop influenza, perhaps even a o... Read More

In Hunt For New Antibiotics, Scientists Look At Bacteria In Insects' Stomachs

Pampering leafcutter ants with fragrant rose petals and fresh oranges may seem an unlikely way to rescue modern medicine, but scientists at a lab in eastern England think it's well worth trying.

As the world cries out for new antibiotics, researchers at the John Innes Center (JIC) in Norwich ... Read More

Viruses take down massive algal blooms, with big implications for climate

Humans are increasingly dependent on algae to suck up climate-warming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sink it to the bottom of the ocean. Now, by using a combination of satellite imagery and laboratory experiments, researchers have evidence showing that viruses infecting those algae are d... Read More

Scientists boost potential of passive immunization against HIV

Scientists are pursuing injections or intravenous infusions of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (bNAbs) as a strategy for preventing HIV infection. This technique, called passive immunization, has been shown to protect monkeys from a monkey form of HIV called simian human immunodeficiency vir... Read More

Treating Cancer With Bacteria Shows Real Promise

n a groundbreaking study, researchers say injecting bacteria into a tumor helped shrink it.

Bacteria are generally considered more foe than friend, but that may change, if results from a pioneering study are confirmed.

Reporting in the journal Science Translational Medicine, scientists led... Read More

6.5% NaCl Media

Important ingredients: 6.5% salt, dextrose, bromcresol purple
Differential/Selective: used to test for salt tolerance and can be used to identify enterococcal group D streptococci. NaCl is a selective agent and those organisms that can grow in higher salt concentrations also ferment the dextro... Read More

How U.S. Hospitals Keep Deadly Germs Like Ebola Virus Contained

On Friday afternoon, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a guide explaining how hospitals should manage Ebola patients. Hospital workers entering a patient's room should wear:

- Gloves
- Gown (fluid resistant or impermeable)
- Eye protection (goggles or face shield... Read More

Ebola crisis: A doctor's view from Sierra Leone

West Africa's Ebola epidemic, the deadliest on record, presents particular challenges for medical staff. Here, Irish doctor Gabriel Fitzpatrick describes working for Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) at the centre of the outbreak in Sierra Leone:

MSF constructed a special Ebola treatment centre ... Read More

Gut Flora Influences HIV Immune Response

Normal microorganisms in the intestines appear to play a pivotal role in how the HIV virus foils a successful attack from the body’s immune system, according to new research from Duke Medicine.

The study, published Aug. 13, 2014, in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, builds on previous work fro... Read More

Experts question value of common superbug control practices

The jury is still out on the effectiveness of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) superbug control policies in hospitals, according to leading infectious disease experts. In particular, screening and isolating infected patients -- which have long been regarded as the gold standard ... Read More

Scientists hope bacterial blueprints will soon give doctors and nurses fewer sleepless nights

One of the most common types of bacterial infection might soon give doctors and nurses fewer sleepless nights, thanks to a discovery made by scientists at Trinity College Dublin. The scientists used X-ray crystallography techniques to provide a blueprint of the cellular machinery used by Pseudom... Read More

Preemies’ gut bacteria may depend more on gestational age than environment​

Scientists believe babies are born with digestive systems containing few or no bacteria. Their guts then quickly become colonized by microbes — good and bad — as they nurse or take bottles, receive medication and even as they are passed from one adoring relative to another.

However, in infant... Read More

Ebola declared a public health emergency

World Health Organization announcement could shift focus to basic public health.

The escalating Ebola outbreak in West Africa poses an international threat and all countries must work together to contain it, the World Health Organization (WHO) said today (8 August). The announcement comes ami... Read More

Microbiology: Microbiome science needs a healthy dose of scepticism

Explorations of how the microscopic communities that inhabit the human body might contribute to health or disease have moved from obscure to ubiquitous. Over the past five years, studies have linked our microbial settlers to conditions as diverse as autism, cancer and diabetes.

This excitemen... Read More

Gut Microbes Browse Along a Gene Buffet

In the moist, dark microbial rainforest of the intestine, hundreds of species of microorganisms interact with each other and with the cells of the host animal to get the resources they need to survive and thrive.

Though there's a lot of competition in this vibrant ecosystem, collaboration is... Read More

Experimental Vaccine For Chikungunya Passes First Test

Scientists have taken the first steps to developing a vaccine for chikungunya — an emerging mosquito-borne virus that has infected more than a half million people in the Western Hemisphere this year. About 600 Americans have brought the virus to 43 states.

The study was small. Only 25 people ... Read More

Life Found 800 Meters Down in Antarctic Subglacial Lake

A cold breeze blew off the Antarctic plain, numbing the noses and ears of scientists standing around a dark hole in the ice. Flecks of ice crackled off a winch as it reeled the last few meters of cable out of the hole. Two workers in sterile suits leaned over to grab the payload — a cylinder the... Read More

Editing HPV's Genes To Kill Cervical Cancer Cells

Researchers have hijacked a defense system normally used by bacteria to fend off viral infections and redirected it against the human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical, head and neck, and other cancers.

Using the genome editing tool known as CRISPR, the Duke University rese... Read More
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