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Center of fungal colony

Close up of the center of an unknown mold colony seen on TSA, presumably an airborne contaminant. The center is raised and "fluffy" with spore formation seen around it. Read More

Classic Spotlights: Penicillin for the masses

The Journal of Bacteriology is celebrating its centennial this year – one hundred years of valuable scientific discoveries! To illustrate the wide variety of noteworthy results published over the years, the journal is publishing a Classic Spotlight series, in which experts in the field highlight... Read More

Study offers clearest picture yet of how HIV defeats a cellular defender

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A new study offers the first atomic-scale view of an interaction between the HIV capsid - the protein coat that shepherds HIV into the nucleus of human cells - and a host protein known as cyclophilin A. This interaction is key to HIV infection, researchers say. Read More

Zika virus infects human neural stem cells

The Zika virus infects a type of neural stem cell that gives rise to the brain's cerebral cortex, Johns Hopkins and Florida State researchers report March 4 in Cell Stem Cell. On laboratory dishes, these stem cells were found to be havens for viral reproduction, resulting in cell death and/or di... Read More

Parasites help brine shrimp cope with arsenic habitat contamination

Artemia (the scientific name of the small crustacean that is also commonly known as 'sea monkey') is famous for being able to live in extreme environments and has become a model organism used to test the toxicity of chemicals in water. In addition, Artemia can produce dormant eggs, known as cyst... Read More

Novel small-molecule antiviral compound protects monkeys from deadly Ebola virus

Rhesus monkeys were completely protected from Ebola virus when treated three days after infection with a compound that blocks the virus's ability to replicate. These encouraging preclinical results suggest the compound, known as GS-5734, should be further developed as a potential treatment, acco... Read More

Register now for final FREE Mysterious Microbes webinar on Mar 10

Join Noah Fierer, CU Assoc. Professor & CIRES Fellow, as he shares insights from his team's explorations into the distribution and roles of microscopic organisms in diverse environments, including our homes. Noah will discuss how the location, occupants, and house design shapes the types of micr... Read More

Testing the evolution of resistance by experiment

One of the hallmarks of bad science writing is the claim that any research to do with bacteria will lead to new antibiotics. In this case, however, the scientists backed up their claim. They took bacteria notorious for nosocomial infections (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and exposed them to a toxin, ... Read More

A promising Ebolavirus antiviral compound

Remember Ebolaviruses? Many people are still working on vaccines and therapeutics. Here is a very nice story on a promising antiviral compound that is very effective at preventing disease in monkeys. But it doesn't work in mice - it's degraded. You know what they say - mice lie, monkeys exaggera... Read More

Study Calls into Question Current MERS Vaccine Strategy

Washington, DC - March 1, 2016 - A new study suggests that the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) develops mutations that make the virus less virulent during an outbreak rather than more virulent. The study, published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the A... Read More

Red Sandalwood as Skin Whitening Solution: Its now Scientifically proven

In traditional medicine from time immemorial Pterocarpus santalinus (red sandalwood) paste has been used for fair skin complexion . But this may not have yet firm scientific supports so far.Now it is proved by two groups from India independently in bacterial as well as invitro melanoma cell line... Read More

Meta-analysis of urine pre-analytic practice reveals need for rigorous studies

Evidence-based medicine is the approach used by doctors to make rational clinical decisions based on rigorous, well-controlled studies. By minimizing hunches, gut feelings, and anecdotal evidence, physicians and patients can follow recommendations that are most likely to have a positive outcome.... Read More

State laws boost flu vaccination rates in health care workers

PITTSBURGH, March 2, 2016 - State laws mandating influenza immunization for people who work in health care increase their vaccination rates, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Read More

Trinity immunologists find new ways to beat the 'bad guys'

Vaccines are like pathogen imposters - they mimic these 'bad guys' in order to provoke a response from our immune systems, remove the invader and begin the healing process.

One of the key components in a vaccine is an adjuvant, which serves to enhance our body's immune response to vaccination... Read More

MMP #10: Examining the gut microbiota of American Indians of Cheyenne and Arapaho ancestry.

Host: Jeff Fox with special guests, Cecil M. Lewis, Jr. and Krithivasan Sankaranarayanan.


Lewis and Krithivasan Sankaranarayanan—“Krithi”-- both fro... Read More

MERS research yields surprising finding

In 2015, an unexpectedly large outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in South Korea had a disastrous impact on the whole country and highlighted scientists limited knowledge of this virus. Now, new research into this outbreak has revealed some very surprising findin... Read More

Penn study reveals how fish control microbes through their gills

Oriol Sunyer, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, has described fish as "an open gut swimming." Their mucosal surfaces -- their skin, digestive tract and gills -- are in constant contact with water, including any pathogens that that water may contain. Read More

How Forest Loss Is Leading To a Rise in Human Disease

In Borneo, an island shared by Indonesia and Malaysia, some of the world’s oldest tropical forests are being cut down and replaced with oil palm plantations at a breakneck pace. Wiping forests high in biodiversity off the land for monoculture plantations causes numerous environmental problems, f... Read More

Anti-bacterial fabric holds promise for fighting superbug

Antibiotics have proven to be a valuable weapon in the fight against infectious bacteria. However, due to the excess use of antibiotics in conventional treatments, overtime antibiotics have become less effective. Read More

Electron microscopy captures snapshot of structure coronaviruses use to enter cells

High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy and supercomputing have now made it possible to analyze in detail the infection mechanisms of coronaviruses. These viruses are notorious for attacking the respiratory tract of humans and animals. Read More
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