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Harvard Scientists Create Dirt Powered Bacteria Batteries

Harvard scientists believe in the power of the good earth — literally. A team at the Boston-based college have created microbial fuel cell (MFC) batteries that derive energy from naturally occurring bacteria in soil. If the product takes off, the eco-friendly batteries could provide power for so... Read More

Seasonal Vaccine Shortage in U.S. Stoked by Swine Flu Vigilance

Americans who have become hyper- aware of swine flu as the disease sweeps the globe are overwhelming doctors’ offices, clinics and U.S. drugstores for the seasonal-flu vaccine as well, leading to shortages.

The two influenza strains, with similar symptoms and outcomes, may circulate concurren... Read More

TWiV 53: The ends justify the means



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dick Despommier, and Read More

Row at US journal widens

A dispute between the editorial board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) and an academy member has put the fate of three studies in question. In the wake of rows over a controversial paper published by the journal online in August — but not in print — two additional p... Read More

Japanese suit that fights flu

A Japanese company, Haruyama Trading Co., has developed a suit that it claims protects the wearer from the deadly H1N1 strain of influenza.

The company has produced 50,000 of the suits and will start selling them on Thursday, according to a company spokesman.

The suit is coated with the c... Read More

Attachment of several treponemes to testicular cell membranes

Attachment of several treponemes to testicular cell membranes 22 hours post-infection. Note the orientation of the treponemes mediated by their tapered ends and apparent disk-like organelle Read More

Pandemic Payoff from 1918: A Weaker H1N1 Flu Today

Although the swine flu outbreak of 2009 is still in full swing, this global influenza epidemic, the fourth in 100 years, is already teaching scientists valuable lessons about pandemics past, those that might have been and those that still might be. Evidence accumulated this summer indicates that... Read More

Nitrification floc.

Nitrification floc. Note the unusual crown shaped bacterium(11000X) Read More

Frozen Assets: Decades-old Frozen Infant Stool Samples Provide Clues To Norovirus Evolution

A search through decades-old frozen infant stool samples has yielded rich dividends for scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. The team customized a laboratory technique to screen thousands of samples for noro... Read More

Reservoir of deforming tropical disease sought

Knowing what causes a disease may not make it easier to control and contain infection, but understanding how humans become infected and where the pathogens live may improve control. A National Science Foundation grant for $1.5 million over five years will allow an international team of researche... Read More

MTS36 - Dennis Bray - Living Computers



mts-35


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Bug Splatter On Your Car's Windshield Is A Treasure Trove Of Genomic Biodiversity

If you have ever taken a long road trip, the windshield of your car will inevitably be splattered with bugs by the time you arrive at your destination. Could the DNA left behind be used to estimate the diversity of insects in the region? In a study published online in Genome Research, scientists... Read More

In amoeba world, cheating doesn't pay

Cheaters may prosper in the short term, but over time they seem doomed to fail, at least in the microscopic world of amoebas where natural selection favors the noble.

But why? Shouldn't "survival of the fittest" give the sneaky cheaters an edge? Not necessarily, as it turns out amoebas that c... Read More

Major discovery opens door to leishmania treatment

Leishmania is a deadly parasitic disease that affects over 12 million people worldwide, with more than 2 million new cases reported every year. Until recently, scientists were unsure exactly how the parasite survives inside human cells. That mystery has now been solved according to a new study p... Read More

Retrovirus Linked to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Could Aid in Diagnosis

More so than many illnesses, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) frustrates those who suffer from it and those close to them, due to its nebulous assembly of symptoms, along with continued controversies over its etiology, diagnosis, treatment and even its nomenclature. Now, the discovery of a familia... Read More

Mundo de los Microbios - Episodio 23



Entrada: el virus y los murciélagos, identificando a la neumonía, terapia  contra la influenza, y la teoría de germen de la enfermedad.                                                                ... Read More

Bacterium Transforms Toxic Gold Compounds To Their Metallic Form

Australian scientists have found that the bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans catalyses the biomineralisation of gold by transforming toxic gold compounds to their metallic form using active cellular mechanism.

Researchers reported the presence of bacteria on gold surfaces but have never clea... Read More

Life cycle (illustration) of Chlamydia trachomatis

Life cycle (illustration) of Chlamydia trachomatis Read More

Personal genomics firms must come clean

Companies that offer analyses of future health risks based on basic genetic tests should be more transparent about the limitations of their predictions, says genomics pioneer Craig Venter.

He and four colleagues have proposed guidelines for the industry after assessing the results of scans of... Read More

Targeted therapies exploit tiny chinks in cancer's armour

THE weakness in Achilles' heel didn't pose much of a problem until it came into contact with Paris's arrow - at which point it killed him. Now a range of tumours are meeting a similar fate thanks to drugs that turn otherwise insignificant gaps in their defences into fatal flaws.

A pioneering ... Read More

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