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Swine flu: Eight myths that could endanger your life

With the second wave of the H1N1 pandemic underway around the world, this article is a nice resource for dispelling popular myths that surround the flu and the vaccine. Read More

US swine flu vaccine too late to beat autumn wave

President Barack Obama's decision last week to label swine flu a national emergency will likely increase demand for a vaccine that is already in short supply. Yet by the time large amounts of vaccine arrive, it may be too late to stop most infections.

On 23 October, Tom Frieden, head of the C... Read More

In Pandemic Times Are Worms Man’s Best Friend?

A short blog on the potential for helminths as probiotics and as a potential management tool against pandemic influenza. Read More

Halloween and H1N1

How can you stay safe from the H1N1 virus this Halloween...Jason Tetro offers some tips and advice. Read More

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 4

John D. McKinney, Global Health Institute, School of Life Sciences, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), provides an overview of the natural history of TB infection and the global impact of TB on human health.

"All pathogens must acquire and assimilate nutrients from their hosts i... Read More

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 3

John D. McKinney, Global Health Institute, School of Life Sciences, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), provides an overview of the natural history of TB infection and the global impact of TB on human health.

"The principal obstacle to successful treatment of tuberculosis is the ... Read More

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 2

John D. McKinney, Global Health Institute, School of Life Sciences, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), provides an overview of the natural history of TB infection and the global impact of TB on human health.

"Tuberculosis remains one of the most important causes of human disease... Read More

Mundo de los Microbios - Episodio 25



Nuevos enfoques sobre la energía microbiana, el calentamiento global y la cadena alimenticia oceánica, combustible fabricado a partir de la soja y, para finalizar, las lecciones que nos enseñó el huracá... Read More

Northwestern to Start $13.6M NCI Center

Northwestern University has won a $13.6 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to establish a center that will study the roles genes play in cancer, Northwestern said Tuesday.

The five years of funding will go to start the Northwestern Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC), one ... Read More

When Ants Attack: Chemicals That Trigger Aggression In Argentine Ants Synthesized

Experiments led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have demonstrated that normally friendly ants can turn against each other by exploiting the chemical cues they use to distinguish colony-mates from rivals.

The new study, to be published on October 28, in the open-acces... Read More

Do Women Need Such Big Flu Shots?

The emergence of the H1N1 swine flu has added urgency to what has become an annual ritual for millions of Americans: getting a flu shot. The good news is that scientists have developed a vaccine against the H1N1 virus. But it is taking much longer than expected to produce the hundreds of million... Read More

New treatment gives hope for serious horse disease

A research team from the Department of Microbiology at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) has developed a breakthrough vaccine for the highly contagious horse disease strangles, caused by the Streptococcus equi bacterium. The results of the study, published in the journal Publ... Read More

Bioengineered Plants Gone Wild

Special genes inserted into crop plants have a way of leaking into the environment. That much scientists know for sure. What they're less certain about is what effect those genes have on plants growing in the wild.

Andrew Stephenson is interested in answering that question. He's a plant ecolo... Read More

Scientists sift soil for new antibiotics

Scientists are looking at diverse sources — such as soil and frog skins — for new antibiotics, worried that doctors will run out of options to treat increasingly antibiotic-resistant infections.

Doctors fear they may exhaust their antibiotic treatment options because simple infections could b... Read More

Effort Launched To Find And Control Diseases That Move Between Wildlife And People

In hopes of preventing the next global pandemic and a possible death toll into the millions, UC Davis today launches an unprecedented international effort to find and control diseases that move between wildlife and people.

The global early warning system, named PREDICT, will be developed with... Read More

Cockroach Superpower No. 42: They Don’t Need to Pee

"To survive in hostile environments, cockroaches rely on their own vermin: Blattabacterium, a microbe that hitched a ride inside roaches 140 million years ago, and hasn’t left since.

Researchers who sequenced the Blattabacterium genome have found that it converts waste into molecules necessar... Read More

Cladosporium trichoides

Cladosporium trichoides hyphae in brain abscess. Case of Dr. Barnola. PAS stain. Human Read More

Cladosporium trichoides

Cladosporium trichoides hyphae and brown sclerotic cells in abscess of abdominal wall. H & E stain Read More

Fighting H.I.V., a Community at a Time

Federal health officials are preparing a plan to study a bold new strategy to stop the spread of the AIDS virus: routinely testing virtually every adult in a community, and promptly treating those found to be infected.

The strategy is called “test and treat,” and officials say the two sites... Read More

Modified Crops Reveal Hidden Cost Of Resistance

Genetically modified squash plants that are resistant to a debilitating viral disease become more vulnerable to a fatal bacterial infection, according to biologists.

"Cultivated squash is susceptible to a variety of viral diseases and that is a major problem for farmers," said Andrew Stephens... Read More

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