MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Microbes After Hours

MWbannerEbola

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Featured Image

Featured Video

Ebola Virus explained

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Autism vaccine ruling sparks a lot of comment

Today's decision by a federal court that the preservative thimerosal does not cause autism has sparked a lot of comment in the autism community, most of it negative. Many saw it as a government conspiracy to protect the vaccine industry, a claim that has also been made about the swine flu vacci... Read More

Help Canada attract and retain promising young scientists!

Changes to the 2010 Canadian Federal Budget will be deleterious to current and prospective Canadian Post Doctoral Fellows. Please sign this petition to help us recruit and retain these promising new scientists and maintain our status as a country that values its scientists and is a significant c... Read More

More anthrax cases among heroin addicts in Scotland

Have you been following the strange story of the heroin addicts in Scotland who have been contracting anthrax infections? Two more addicts are being treated, according to a report we picked up on Promed, a clearinghouse for infectious disease news. Since December, 10 people have died in Scotlan... Read More

WHO: Influenza B gaining foothold in more countries

Though pandemic flu is circulating at low levels in many parts of the world, Thailand and some West African nations are reporting increased activity, and the virus is being edged out by influenza B in China and other Asian regions, with signs of westward spread, the World Health Organization (WH... Read More

Tumor-Melting Virus vs. Prostate Cancer

A virus that destroys cancer cells but leaves normal cells unharmed works against prostate cancer, a human study shows.

The virus also blasts lymphoid, colon, ovarian, breast, pancreatic, brain, lung, head and neck, and other cancer cells.

The virus is called reovirus, and nearly everyone ... Read More

Potential for Using Algae to Produce Human Therapeutic Proteins Shown

Pharmaceutical companies could substantially reduce the expense of costly treatments for cancer and other diseases produced from mammalian or bacterial cells by growing these human therapeutic proteins in algae -- rapidly growing aquatic plant cells that have recently gained attention for their ... Read More

Malaria rates drop in the Americas, but travelers still worry

Malaria continues to be a global scourge, sickening some 300 million to 500 million people annually. Most of the resulting one million to three million malaria deaths occur in regions where it is highly endemic, such as sub-Saharan Africa and parts of south Asia.

Some parts of the world wher... Read More

Sarcocystis spp. zoites

Sarcocystis spp. zoites Read More

Pigs cannot fly, but their viruses "flew"!

The common idiom states that pigs cannot fly. I don’t think this statement can be easily debated. However, the swine flu viruses now seem to have flown around the globe quickly... Read More

Science Podcasts Galore!

Ginger Campbell, M.D., emergency room physician and host of the popular Brain Science Podcast, has created a site that highlights over 40 science-related podcasts. While all of MicrobeWorld's podcasts are represented on the site there are also some other great offerings, including:

* ACS ... Read More

Can computer viruses evolve?

On a recent episode of TWiV, we posed the question, 'Can computer viruses evolve'? and asked listeners to weigh in. The author of the blog nostacktrace spent some time thinking about this issue and concludes that the evolution of real computer programs doesn't really work. Software instructions ... Read More

It’s not easy to make the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus a killer

The second RNA segment of some influenza virus strains encodes a protein called PB1-F2 that might contribute to virulence. Speaking about the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain, Peter Palese noted that “If this virulence marker is necessary for an influenza virus to become highly pathogenic in humans or ... Read More

CDC Used Frequent Shoppers' Cards to Track the Salami/Red Pepper Salmonella Outbreak

Investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention used frequent-shopper cards that millions of Americans swipe when they buy groceries to track down the source of salmonella in the recent salami recall. Read More

Desperate Efforts to Save Endangered Bats May Fail

A desperate attempt to keep endangered Virginia big-eared bats alive in captivity has shown just how difficult that noble task may be.

The effort was prompted by the discovery of White Nose Syndrome, an extremely virulent disease that has killed more than one million bats since 2007, in one o... Read More

New Ways to Disarm Deadly South American Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses

New World hemorrhagic fevers are emerging infectious diseases found in South America that can cause terrible, Ebola-like symptoms. Current treatments are expensive and only partially effective.

Now, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers have discovered exactly how one type of New... Read More

Assessing Antibiotic Breakdown in Manure

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist Scott Yates is studying how oxytetracycline (OTC), an antibiotic that is administered to animals, breaks down in cattle manure.

Livestock producers in the United States often use antibiotics to control disease in their animals, and confined U.S. l... Read More

Human cells exhibit foraging behavior like amoebae and bacteria

When cells move about in the body, they follow a complex pattern similar to that which amoebae and bacteria use when searching for food, a team of Vanderbilt researchers have found.

The discovery has a practical value for drug development: Incorporating this basic behavior into computer simul... Read More

Disease Cause Is Pinpointed With Genome

Two research teams have independently decoded the entire genome of patients to find the exact genetic cause of their diseases. The approach may offer a new start in the so far disappointing effort to identify the genetic roots of major killers like heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

In... Read More

Sputnik, the first Virophage: I’m on the Radio, I’m on the Video

Once upon a time, in 2003, a French team discovered a giant virus infects amoeba. It was isolated from a cooling tower in the UK. They were so excited because it was so huge with a genome contains 900 protein-encoding genes (The words giant/ huge are totally hilarious. It’s not “Hulk”, it’s just... Read More

Like father Like son: He got his father’s virus!!

In an on-going study at the University of Rochester Medical Center, scientists have come across a new form of inheritance which would probably astonish Mendel himself. Research has shown that parents pass on the human herpes virus 6 “HHV-6″ to their offspring because the virus has integrated its... Read More

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use