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Take that Dengue fever, & how 'bout some of this!

As if I needed another reason to hate mosquitoes, thankfully the ones that transmit Dengue fever don't hang around the DC Metro area much. Guess this just proves that old say - "the bacterium enemy of my viral enemy is my friend" - even truer than it was before.

P.S. Anything that helps p... Read More

Virus 'cloaking device' explained by Oregon scientists

In our escalating arms race with infectious microbes, a handful of the toughest opponents have developed weapons that render vaccination seemingly worthless.

Oregon scientists now say they've figured out the defensive weapons of one the trickiest of these resilient attackers: cytomegalovirus,... Read More

Microbes reprogrammed to ooze oil for renewable biofuel

Using genetic sleight of hand, researcher Xinyao Liu and professor Roy Curtiss at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute have coaxed photosynthetic microbes to secrete oil—bypassing energy and cost barriers that have hampered green biofuel production. Their results appear in this week's ... Read More

Military green: U.S. Air Force flies on biofuel

The U.S. Air Force burns through 2.4 billion gallons of jet fuel a year, all of it derived from oil. But a test flight on March 25 just might allow a flowering weed known as camelina to replace petroleum as part of the military's energy mix. An A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft took flight from Elgi... Read More

Customize your Firefox Browser with a MicrobeWorld Persona

With the launch of Firefox 3.63, the new version of the popular browser allows users to easily "skin" their browser's appearance.

If you visit the link under "Source" above and you are using the latest version of Firefox, you will be able to wear MicrobeWorld's team colors while you surf the... Read More

Veteran Women BioMed Researchers Still Shortchanged

You might expect young women scientists to make less than older men. But veteran female life science researchers, even in very advanced positions, still make less than their male counterparts. So finds a report in the journal Academic Medicine. [See http://bit.ly/9C7nlF]

Previous studies abou... Read More

HIV drugs could have second life as treatment for retrovirus correlated with prostate cancer

Some medications already being used to treat HIV appear to inhibit a retrovirus that has been linked to prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome, reports a new study published online April 1 in PLoS ONE.

Like HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), XMRV (xenotropic murine leukemia virus-relat... Read More

Inositol or bust: genes reveal importance of inositol for Cryptococci

When Bacillus subtilis gets the chance, it establishes thick, gluey biofilms held together by a matrix of exopolysaccharides and protein. Once cells sense that there’s enough extracellular matrix, they switch over to sporulating and tend to localize themselves in aerial protrusions so they can ... Read More

Microsporum canis macroconidium

Microsporum canis macroconidium. Unstained interference phase (1000X) Read More

Census Data Aid Disease Simulation Studies

Did you know that filling out your census card will help computer scientists model how diseases spread in the United States?

Over the last four years, researchers at RTI International in North Carolina have been transforming data from the 2000 census -- which described the country's 281 milli... Read More

The little molecules that could . . . help us unravel TB?

The more I read about Mycobacterium tuberculosis the more I'm strangely impressed by it. It's subtly devious, patient - notice how it can persist inside a host for decades - and fearsomely adaptive. A worthy adversary, to be certain. Read More

Science and Nature to publish new open access journal

"Science and Nature have ended their historic battle for the world’s best basic science articles, agreeing to cease their respective publications and co-launch an open-access, online-only journal with an innovative democratic peer-review system, sources at both journals revealed this morning.

... Read More

Researchers Report Progress on E. Coli Test

It’s not the pathogenic E. coli microbe itself that harms people who eat ground beef or other foods that contain it. Rather, it’s the toxins that E. coli produces that do the actual damage. Proper testing of food should look for both, though, since it is possible for one to be present without th... Read More

Mundo de los Microbios - Episodio 47

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A continuación: Las agujas limpias disminuyen la transmisión del VIH, Tratamiento de las infecciones respiratorias, Pollos ecológicos resistentes a los antibióticos, and Prevención de la... Read More

Is this the end of gene patenting?

A court in New York yesterday ruled that patents on two genes linked to breast cancer are invalid.

By declaring that the genes can't be patented because they are essentially products of nature rather than inventions, the US District Court for the Southern District of New York state has effect... Read More

Sugar-rubber tyre inches closer to the road

Even the most clapped-out jalopy could get a green upgrade thanks to a process that can turn plants into synthetic rubber for tyres – usually, the stuff is made from petroleum.

Isoprene is a synthetic version of natural rubber that is used primarily in tyres: it makes up as much as 27 per cen... Read More

A killer in the bat cave

Corpse upon corpse they lie, a carpet of emaciated, fungus-ridden carcasses. Where once healthy animals hung in slumber from the cave roof, now there is a mass grave on the floor. It is a scene that is repeated throughout the eastern US, from Vermont to West Virginia. America's bats are in crisi... Read More

Flu Jab For Bacteria

Viruses can wreak havoc on bacteria as well as humans and, just like us, bacteria have their own defense system in place, explained Professor John van der Oost, at the Society for General Microbiology's spring meeting on March 31. Uncovering the workings of the bacterial "immune system" could be... Read More

Students protest at Montana State University to save the microbiology department

"Carrying signs that read "Save the Microbiology Department," about 60 students, professors and staff members gathered Wednesday at noon to protest Montana State University's decision to dissolve their department.

While student organizers succeeded in gathering a well-mannered crowd outside M... Read More

Millions of H1N1 vaccine doses may have to be discarded

Despite months of dire warnings and millions in taxpayer dollars, less than half of the 229 million doses of H1N1 vaccine the government bought to fight the pandemic have been administered -- leaving an estimated 71.5 million doses that must be discarded if they are not used before they expire.
... Read More

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