MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Microbes After Hours

MWbannerEbola

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Featured Image

Featured Video

Ebola Virus explained

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Biowarfare on Afghanistan's Poppy Fields?

Some Afghan farmers are blaming British and American soldiers for spraying the crops with the disease. Officials have denied involvement.

Jean-Luc Lemahieu, head of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime in Afghanistan (UNODC), said that plant samples were currently being tested to confirm whether ... Read More

Fratricide between pneumococci and crystal structure of LytC

A collaboration of two spanish groups from CSIC had solved the 3D structure of LytC. The structure explains the peculiar role that this protein plays during a process known as pneumococcal fratricide. The structure has been published in the last issue of Nature Structural Molecular Biology.

Read More

Cell social network reveals rogue cancer switches

In certain social circles, it's not what you know, but who you know that counts. The same seems to be true of the gene switches that turn on cancer cells.

One way cells turn genes on and off is via small RNA molecules. In cancer, the usual pattern of microRNA production is disrupted. But as s... Read More

At Front Lines, AIDS War Is Falling Apart

On the grounds of Uganda’s biggest AIDS clinic, Dinavance Kamukama sits under a tree and weeps.

Her disease is probably quite advanced: her kidneys are failing and she is so weak she can barely walk. Leaving her young daughter with family, she rode a bus four hours to the hospital where her ... Read More

Biologists Link Gut Microbial Equilibrium to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

We are not alone -- even in our own bodies. The human gut is home to 100 trillion bacteria, which, for millions of years, have co-evolved along with our digestive and immune systems. Most people view bacteria as harmful pathogens that cause infections and disease. Other, more agreeable, microbes... Read More

Suppressing activity of common intestinal bacteria reduces tumor growth

A team of University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers has discovered that common intestinal bacteria appear to promote tumor growths in genetically susceptible mice, but that tumorigenesis can be suppressed if the mice are exposed to an inhibiting protein enzyme.

The re... Read More

21st Century Vaccines: Kill More Birds With Fewer Stones

Change is a-coming. Thats what Rino Rappouli (of Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics in Siena, Italy) and Antonio Cassone (of the Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immunomediated Diseases at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita Rome) argue in a new Perspectives piece accepted for the inaugural ... Read More

El podcast del Microbio Nº 102



























In the Nº 102 of the "El podcast del microbio" I discuss the panspermia theory and the results of the satellite Foton M3 experiment. En el p... Read More

Hospital infection risk revealed

Every year, thousands of people in Arizona contract an infection while being treated in a hospital.

The illness, which sometimes is fatal, may come from a doctor's unwashed hands, dirty hospital scrubs, unclean medical instruments or even bacteria found on the patient's skin.

But unlike in... Read More

Genes as fossils

When exactly did oxygen first appear in Earth’s atmosphere? Although many physical and chemical processes are thought to be responsible for that profound transformation, scientists have tried to answer at least part of that question by looking for the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis — the pro... Read More

Meningitis C vaccine 'wears off in early teens'

Three-quarters of children vaccinated against meningitis C lose their protection against the disease by their early teens, research suggests. The Oxford team which did the work says its findings fuel calls for a booster jab to be offered to adolescents. The study of 250 children aged six to 12, ... Read More

Inhalable Measles Vaccine Seen as Treatment Boon

Researchers say that a dry, inhalable vaccine developed for measles prevention may also help pave the way for the inexpensive treatment of a range of other illnesses.

More immediately, news of the vaccine should be especially welcomed by less-developed nations, where there is more limited acc... Read More

Biologists Discover an Extra Layer of Protection for Bacterial Spores

Bacterial spores, the most resistant organisms on earth, carry an extra coating of protection previously undetected, a team of microbiologists reports in the latest issue of the journal Current Biology. Their findings offer additional insight into why spores of the bacteria that cause botulism, ... Read More

TWiV 81 letters

Jesper writes:


Dear Professors,


Having upped my daily dose of podcasts I stumbled upon This Week In Science. The latest show (http://www.twis.org/audio/2010/03/09/438/) they mentioned something that probably comes within your sphere of interest, namely the fin... Read More

TWiV 81: Be a virus, see the world

Unable to embed Rapid1Pixelout audio player. Please double check that:  1)You have the latest version of Adobe Flash Player.  2)This web page does not have any fatal Javascript errors.  3)The audio-player.js file of Rapid1Pixelout has been included.

On episode #81 of the podcast This Week in Virology, Vincent and Rich answer listener questions on viruses and gluten allergy, RNA silencing, influenza virus, herpes simplex virus, HIV/AIDS, chronic... Read More

Porcine circovirus DNA found in RotaTeq

The US Food and Drug Administration recently recommended that administration of Glaxo SmithKline’s Rotarix vaccine, which protects against rotavirus infection, be suspended after an independent research group found that the vaccine contains DNA of porcine circovirus type 1. Now the FDA reports f... Read More

A year later, 5 lessons from swine flu outbreak

Last April, a strange new virus was sickening and killing patients in Mexico. It showed up in two children at a California clinic. Identified as a new form of H1N1, or swine flu, it quickly became a test of the USA's preparations for an epidemic and the public's ability to cope with fear of the ... Read More

Kon-Tiki, Bacteria Style

Dangerous bacteria may be rafting their way to a beach near you. New research reveals that, just like a rat clinging to a piece of floating wood after a flood, pathogenic microorganisms can set up shop aboard drifting bits of fish feces and other debris and ride them to far-flung destinations. U... Read More

FDA panel members support continued use of both rotavirus vaccines despite trace contaminants

Members of a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee meeting Friday urged physicians to continue using both commercial rotavirus vaccines despite evidence that both carry trace contaminants from a harmless pig virus. The panel did not take a formal vote on a recommendation, but a majorit... Read More

Is This What Aliens Look Like?

A lake of asphalt may be the closest thing on Earth to the hydrocarbon seas on Saturn's moon Titan -- and our asphalt lakes are teeming with microbial life.

Not only could these findings help in the search for aliens in our own solar system, but they could provide insight into the evolution ... Read More

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use