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Sweet Sweet Straw

The calorie free sweetener erythritol is widely used in Asia; it is also gaining popularity in Europe and America. At the Vienna University of Technology, a new cheap method has been developed to produce erythritol from straw with the help of mould fungi.

Erythritol has many great advantages:... Read More

"Microbe-Powered Jobs: How Microbiologists Can Help Build the Bioeconomy" Infographic

The American Academy of Microbiology has just released a new report, "Microbe-Powered Jobs: How Microbiologists Can Help Build the Bioeconomy," and along with it, an infographic, that summarizes the main points of the report. The full report can be found here: http://bit.ly/1lk346I, and a link t... Read More

The day they discovered the AIDS virus

A historical look back at the discovery of the AIDS virus. Margaret Heckler, president Reagan's Health and Human Services Secretary made the announcement to the world. “First, the probable cause of AIDS has been found: a variant of a known human cancer virus. Second, not only has the agent been ... Read More

Mathematical modelling disproves long-held view of bacterial cell cycle

A key theory of the cell cycle of asymmetric bacteria, which has prevailed for the last ten years, has been disproved by a combined approach using mathematical modelling and genetic experiments.

Modellers Prof. Martin Howard and Dr Seán Murray, from the John Innes Centre on the Norwich Resear... Read More

TWiV 299: Rocky Mountain virology

Vincent visits the Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana and speaks with Marshall, Sonja, and Byron about their work on tick-born flaviviruses, innate immunity, and prion diseases.


Host: Vincent ... Read More

Advocating Pill, U.S. Signals Shift to Prevent AIDS

Federal health officials recommended Wednesday that hundreds of thousands of Americans at risk for AIDS take a daily pill that has been shown to prevent infection with the virus that causes it.

If broadly followed, the advice could transform AIDS prevention in the United States — from relianc... Read More

Successful Test in Humans of Nasal Vaccine Against Pertussis

The CHILD-INNOVAC European research programme, coordinated by Inserm, has enabled the development of an innovative vaccine that can be administered intranasally, to combat pertussis, which has shown a resurgence in developed countries in recent years. The research consortium, headed by Camille L... Read More

Gut microbiota and the evolution of species

Science Magazine has recently published a study carried out by Dr. Robert Brucker and Dr. Seth R. Bordenstein from Vanderbilt University in Nashville (USA) that seems to provide clues reinforcing the “hologenome theory of evolution”. This research suggests that the gut microbiome may have a fund... Read More

Scientists Discover First ‘Virological Penicillin’

Chinese researchers have discovered what they say is the first ‘virological penicillin’ – MIR2911, a molecule found naturally in a Chinese herb called honeysuckle.

Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) is a well-known Chinese herb. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, it has been used to effectively tr... Read More

Sweet Valentine

Four intracellular Toxoplasma gondii parasites are shown undergoing cellular division by an internal budding process known as endodyogeny. Staining with a T. gondii surface antigen provided heart-shaped images (shot on Valentine’s Day). The definitive host of these parasites is the cat, but they... Read More

HIV Epidemic in IDUs is at the Verge of Explosion in Pakistan

In Pakistan IDUs is the highest HIV infected risk group, mainly because of frequent sharing of contaminated needles, paid blood donations and unprotected commercial sex. These IDUs are serving as bridge to transfer the HIV to general population transmitting the virus to their wives and children.... Read More

Mycotoxin protects against nematodes

Researchers at ETH Zurich have isolated a protein from a fungus of the spruce which combats nematodes. The scientists hope that toxins of this kind will become the basis for the vaccination of livestock or domestic animals against zooparasitic nematodes.

Most terrestrial plants enter into bio... Read More

Shifting evolution into reverse promises cheaper, greener way to make new drugs

By shifting evolution into reverse, it may be possible to use “green chemistry” to make a number of costly synthetic drugs as easily and cheaply as brewing beer. Normally, both evolution and synthetic chemistry proceed from the simple to the complex. Small molecules are combined and modified to ... Read More

H5N1 bird flu death confirmed in Alberta, 1st in North America

Alberta health officials have confirmed an isolated, fatal case of H5N1 or avian influenza, federal Health Minister Rona Ambrose said Wednesday.

But officials repeatedly emphasized that there is no risk of transmission between humans.

The infected person, an Alberta resident who recently ... Read More

Infection with the common cold virus: scientists reveal new insights

The common cold virus (rhinovirus) is a tiny, almost round particle, containing the tightly packed genetic material surrounded by a protein shell (the virus capsid). Details on how the RNA is prepped to exit the capsid and effectively infect us have now been provided by scientists from the Max F... Read More

ASM program in "Scientific writing and publishing"

Dear Board,
Here is the one JPG picture attachment. please find it out here.In 20 April 2014 here in Nepal, we have ASM program in "Scientific Writing and Publishing" by ASM young ambassador to Nepal Dr.shyam prakash Dumre. We can see in below picture students posing for group photo and are in... Read More

A Pill Filled with Bacteria Instead of Drugs

Delivering healthy bacteria in a pill could help patients harboring out-of-balance microbial communities. Yogurt eaters already know that not all bacteria are bad for you. They may not realize that some bacteria are so important that one day people may fight off disease with pills filled with ba... Read More

Host plants reprogram their root cells to accommodate symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria

To enter into symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, host plants reprogram their root cells. An LMU team has now identified a calcium-binding protein complex that can be persuaded to spontaneously induce the formation of root nodules.

In almost all ecosystems, plant growth rates are limited... Read More

Symbiotic Fungi Inhabiting Plant Roots Have Major Impact On Atmospheric Carbon

AUSTIN, Texas — Microscopic fungi that live in plants' roots play a major role in the storage and release of carbon from the soil into the atmosphere, according to a University of Texas at Austin researcher and his colleagues at Boston University and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. ... Read More

We Are Our Bacteria

Like ecosystems the world over, the human microbiome is losing its diversity, to the potential detriment of the health of those it inhabits.

Dr. Martin J. Blaser, a specialist in infectious diseases at the New York University School of Medicine and the director of the Human Microbiome Program... Read More

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