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Unknown contaminant on Blood agar

Unknown contaminant, possible Bacillus spp, seen on an old blood agar plate that had been inoculated with Strep bovis. The plate had been incubated at 37 degree's C for 24 hrs then held at room temp for a week. One colony was mucoid with a brain like appearance the other being mucoid and smoo... Read More

TWiM 137 Letters

Daniel writes:


Hello,
Long time listener, first time writer. It has been far too long for me to offer my sincere gratitude for the podcasts. Some years ago I was a welder working a very boring job and I managed to get through my day by listening to podcasts and l... Read More

Unlocking cryptic Strepomyces genes in the search for potential new antibiotics

Actinobacteria are the bacterial phylum responsible for production of many clinically-relevant antibacterial compounds. Streptomyces is a soil-dwelling genus of actinobacteria that produces drugs like neomycin and chloramphenicol. Despite deriving many antibiotics already from Streptomyces, coul... Read More

Onward toward a Zika vaccine

On Monday, August 1, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that pregnant women not travel to Wynwood, a neighborhood north of downtown Miami, because health officials in Florida had found that mosquitoes there are actively transmitting Zika, a mosquito-borne virus that ca... Read More

Researchers Identify Multidrug-resistant E. coli Bacteria from a New Jersey Patient

Antimicrobial resistance has been a growing concern in the health care community. But a publication by Chinese researchers in The Lancet Infectious Diseases last fall kicked things up a notch. The work found the mcr-1 gene, which confers resistance to the antibiotic colistin, in Escherichia coli... Read More

Optical tractor beam traps bacteria

Up to now, if scientists wanted to study blood cells, algae, or bacteria under the microscope, they had to mount these cells on a substrate such as a glass slide. Physicists at Bielefeld and Frankfurt Universities have developed a method that traps biological cells with a laser beam enabling the... Read More

Using a 'living antibiotic' to tackle disease

It is the first time the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus has been successfully used as an injected anti-bacterial therapy and represents an important step in the fight against drug-resistant infections, or ‘superbugs’.

Shigella infection is responsible for over 160 million illn... Read More

Zika Virus in the USA

On this episode of Virus Watch we cover three Zika virus stories: the first human trial of a Zika virus vaccine, the first local transmission of infection in the United States, and whether the virus is a threat to participants in the 2016 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. Read More

A new vaccine has developed by Russia

Russian President Vladimir Putin claimed Wednesday his country had developed a vaccine for the Ebola virus which has killed thousands of people in west Africa.

But Putin, who is famed for his talent for headline-grabbing announcements, did not give any name for the vaccine, nor did he say how... Read More

Threat of novel swine flu viruses in pigs and humans

The wide diversity of flu in pigs across multiple continents, mostly introduced from humans, highlights the significant potential of new swine flu strains emerging, according to a study to be published in eLife. Read More

Researchers discover key to long-lasting malaria immunity and potential vaccine targets

Houston Methodist researchers have discovered a set of immune proteins that facilitate long-lasting immunity against malaria. In a study recently published in Immunity (online Oct. 25), researchers reported that elevated production of specific proteins regulating the immune system within 24 hour... Read More

The Natural History of Cheese Mites

They are right on the border of what is visible and invisible. If you look really close at a piece of aged cheese, it’s possible to see them, barely. The more “artisanal” the cheese, the better the chance that they are there: living within tiny burrows on the rind proportionally the size of gian... Read More

TWiM Special: Q fever with Robert Heinzen

At the Rocky Mountain Laboratory in Hamilton, Montana, Vincent speaks with Robert Heinzen about the work of his laboratory on Q fever and its causative microbe, Coxiella burneti.


Hosts: 


Vincent ... Read More

Microbes in Raw Milk Influenced by Dairy Cow Environment

Raw milk collected from dairy farms has to travel to processing facilities before it is transformed into the delicious dairy products we consume. Because the milk from many dairy cows is collected together, any contamination issue from a single animal can lead to spoilage or contamination. How r... Read More

ASM Members Deliver a Landslide Endorsement for Governance Change - Part I

Change does not come easily to most organizations, let alone to one with more than a century of history. Indeed, twice before ASM tried—and failed—to change its governance structure. This time, ASM members embraced change, realizing that ASM must become more modern and more nimble in its decisio... Read More

Low risk of dengue infection predicted for foreign visitors to Rio Olympics

In 2014, before the FIFA World Cup opened in Brazil, there were fears that many of the 600,000 foreign visitors expected for the world's largest soccer tournament would acquire dengue fever. Their numbers could reach hundreds or even thousands, according to some predictions. Read More

High protein diet could reduce obesity in dogs

“There are many gut microbiome studies on humans and rodents, but not a whole lot on dogs, in particular,” says Johnny Li, a computational biologist at the Nestle Purina PetCare Company, in St. Louis. He recently led a study on the connection between diet and intestinal bacteria on 64 dogs — 32 ... Read More

An ancient killer: Ancestral malarial organisms traced to age of dinosaurs

CORVALLIS, Ore. - A new analysis of the prehistoric origin of malaria suggests that it evolved in insects at least 100 million years ago, and the first vertebrate hosts of this disease were probably reptiles, which at that time would have included the dinosaurs. Read More

Neanderthals may have been infected by diseases carried out of Africa by humans

A new study suggests that Neanderthals across Europe may well have been infected with diseases carried out of Africa by waves of anatomically modern humans, or Homo sapiens. As both were species of hominin, it would have been easier for pathogens to jump populations, say researchers. This might ... Read More

HIV infection prematurely ages humans by an average of 5 years

Thanks to combination antiretroviral therapy, many people with HIV can be expected to live decades after being infected. Yet doctors have observed that these patients often show signs of premature aging. Now a study published April 21 in Molecular Cell has applied a highly accurate biomarker to ... Read More
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