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Stability of MERS Under Different Environmental Conditions (research)

The stability of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was determined at 20°C – 40% relative humidity (RH); 30°C – 30% RH and 30°C – 80% RH. MERS-CoV was more stable at low temperature/low humidity conditions and could still be recovered after 48 hours. During aerosolisation of... Read More

Notre Dame researchers uncover keys to antibiotic resistance in MRSA (press release)

University of Notre Dame researchers Shahriar Mobashery and Mayland Chang and their collaborators in Spain have published research results this week that show how methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) regulates the critical crosslinking of its cell wall in the face of beta-lactam an... Read More

Fecal transplant pill knocks out recurrent C. diff infection, study shows (Press Release)

SAN FRANCISCO – Swallowing pills containing a concentrate of fecal bacteria successfully stops recurrent bouts of debilitating Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection by rebalancing the bacteria in the gut, suggests a study being presented at the IDWeek 2013™ meeting today.

Infection from C... Read More

Rutgers Scientists Discover Molecules that Show Promise for New Anti-Flu Medicines

A new way to attack flu viruses is taking shape in laboratories at Rutgers University, where scientists have identified chemical agents that block the virus’s ability to replicate itself in cell culture.

These novel compounds show promise for a new class of antiviral medicines to fight much-f... Read More

TWiV 253: I don't know anything about sorghum

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Read More

Antarctica's extreme salt-loving microbes like to swap DNA

Microbes living in Antarctica's saltiest lake swap huge chunks of genetic material as a means of surviving their harsh environment, a new study finds.

The single-celled organisms, called haloarchaea for their salt-loving ways, are biologically distinct from bacteria, algae and other tiny crea... Read More

Liquid soap in public toilets may be covering you in bacteria

Liquid hand soap in many public toilets is doing the opposite of improving hygiene, CCTV reports.

One sample was found to have 600 times more than the standard amount of bacteria, bringing it up to fast food ice levels of grossness. Experts warned that use of the soap could result in skin irr... Read More

AIDS virus in cats might help human vaccine effort

Cats may hold a key to developing an HIV vaccine for people, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that a protein from the virus that causes AIDS in cats triggered an immune response in blood from HIV-infected people. The virus that causes AIDS in people is called the human immunodeficiency... Read More

The Government Shuts Down And The Microbes Win

The shutdown of the US government has many repercussions that are almost immeasurable and hit US citizens from every direction. But a quartet of them stands out for their potential to pose a threat to public health because they’ll allow microbes to gain footholds as our defenses against them fal... Read More

Oral Bacteria Found in Alzheimer’s Tissue

A particular type of oral bacteria has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study conducted by an international team of researchers.

They believe that the bacterium found in the brain can trigger immune system responses and pathological changes, which could lead to diseases ... Read More

Rare seawater 'flesh-eating' bacteria kills 35 a year

The death last week of a Florida man from an uncommon flesh-eating bacterium was the state's ninth so far this year.

The bacterium is in the same family as those that cause cholera.

Henry Konietzky, 59, of Palm Coast, Fla., died Sept. 23 after setting crab traps two days earlier in the riv... Read More

UF researchers report cats may be the key to human HIV vaccine

Blood from HIV-infected human subjects shows an immune response against a cat AIDS virus protein, a surprise finding that could help scientists find a way to develop a human AIDS vaccine, report University of Florida and University of California, San Francisco researchers.

Their findings appe... Read More

Rutgers Scientists Discover Molecules that Show Promise for New Anti-Flu Medicines

A new way to attack flu viruses is taking shape in laboratories at Rutgers University, where scientists have identified chemical agents that block the virus’s ability to replicate itself in cell culture.

These novel compounds show promise for a new class of antiviral medicines to fight much-f... Read More

Critical tool for brain research derived from 'pond scum'

The poster child for basic research might well be a one-celled green algae found in ordinary lakes and ponds. Amazingly, this unassuming creature—called Chlamydomonas—is helping scientists solve one of the most complex and important mysteries of science: How billions of neurons in the brain inte... Read More

Important step-forward in mission to tackle parasitic worm infections

Gastrointestinal parasitic infections, which are worm infections in the intestine, affect nearly one quarter of the world population and have been heavily linked with poverty in poorer regions.

They normally result in a chronic, long-lived infection associated with poor quality of life and he... Read More

How an Aggressive Fungal Pathogen Causes Mold in Fruits and Vegetables

A research team led by a molecular plant pathologist at the University of California, Riverside has discovered the mechanism by which an aggressive fungal pathogen infects almost all fruits and vegetables.

The team discovered a novel “virulence mechanism” — the mechanism by which infection ta... Read More

UC Riverside research has large implications for controlling insect-born diseases worldwide

Insects are repelled by N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide, also known as DEET. But exactly which olfactory receptors insects use to sense DEET has eluded scientists for long.

Now researchers at the University of California, Riverside have identified these DEET-detecting olfactory receptors that cause ... Read More

Key Mechanism Behind Herpes Revealed

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have for the first time managed to measure the internal pressure that enables the herpes virus to infect cells in the human body. The discovery paves the way for the development of new medicines to combat viral infections. The results indicate good chance... Read More

Spectacular Microscopic Art Is Also World-Changing Science

Fernan Federici’s microscopic images of plants, bacteria, and crystals are a classic example of finding art in unexpected places.

A couple years ago, Federici was working on his Ph.D. in biological sciences at Cambridge University studying self-organization, the process by which things organi... Read More

A microbe's fountain of youth

The yeast S.pombe is one of the best-studied microbes in the world. First isolated from East African millet beer over a century ago, it's been used as a model organism in molecular and cell biology for the past sixty years. And yet scientists have now just uncovered what may be its most striking... Read More

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