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Harnessing the Power of Bacteria’s Sophisticated Immune System

Bacteria’s ability to destroy viruses has long puzzled scientists, but researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they now have a clear picture of the bacterial immune system and say its unique shape is likely why bacteria can so quickly recognize and destroy their as... Read More

TWiV 298: MV-NIS de myelo

The TWiV gang answers follow-up questions about the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, then discuss treatment of  disseminated multiple myeloma with oncolytic measles virus.


Hosts: Vincent Racaniello... Read More

Ebola Protein Blocks Early Step in Body’s Counterattack on Virus

One of the human body’s first responses to a viral infection is to make and release signaling proteins called interferons, which amplify the immune system response to viruses. Over time, many viruses have evolved to undermine interferon’s immune-boosting signal, and a new study describes a mecha... Read More

Zombie ant fungi manipulate hosts to die on the 'doorstep' of the colony

A parasitic fungus that must kill its ant hosts outside their nest to reproduce and transmit its infection, manipulates its victims to die in the vicinity of the colony, ensuring a constant supply of potential new hosts, according to researchers at Penn State and colleagues at Brazil's Federal U... Read More

Biomotor discovered in many bacteria and viruses

Nano-biotechnologists have reported the discovery of a new, third class of biomotor, unique in that it uses a "revolution without rotation" mechanism. These revolution biomotors are widespread among many bacteria and viruses.

Click "source" to read more. Read More

Bats in Geelong

After recording TWiV 296 with Linfa Wang, we drove to a nearby golf course. There we watched a colony of grey-headed flying foxes awaken and fly into the night.

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Viruses take down massive algal blooms, with big implications for climate

Humans are increasingly dependent on algae to suck up climate-warming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sink it to the bottom of the ocean. Now, by using a combination of satellite imagery and laboratory experiments, researchers have evidence showing that viruses infecting those algae are d... Read More

Beating bad bacteria

Wake Forest sophomore receives prestigious award to study dangerous bacteria.

The notion that trillions of bacteria are packed into the human body is enough to give anyone the heebie jeebies.

But not all bacteria are bad, said Hannah Martin, a rising sophomore. On the contrary, there are ... Read More

Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis

This video contains images of LaDuke hot spring in Gardiner, Montana, along the Yellowstone River, near Yellowstone National Park. The images show the rich mat community of chlorophototrophic bacteria that grow along the hot spring's effluent channel. The dark-green-colored organisms are mainly ... Read More

Asian Tiger Mosquito Could Expand Painful Caribbean Virus into U.S.

Rapid expansion of this species, which is more aggressive than the species that is now spreading chikungunya into the Caribbean, is worrying scientists.

In the past few months, passengers at North American airports have been warned that travel to the Caribbean might result in an unwanted souv... Read More

The Ebola Outbreak: 'A Dress Rehearsal For The Next Big One'

Until this year, the world had recorded 1,640 deaths from Ebola since the virus was discovered in 1976.

Then Ebola appeared in West Africa.

So far this year, 887 people have died of Ebola in West Africa, the World Health Organization said Monday.

To put that into perspective, more than ... Read More

What’s wiping out the Caribbean corals?

Here’s what we know about white-​​band dis­ease: It has already killed up to 95 per­cent of the Caribbean’s reef-​​building elkhorn and staghorn corals, and it’s caused by an infec­tious bac­teria that seems to be trans­mitted through the water and by coral-​​eating snails.

Here’s what we don... Read More

Mouth Bacteria Can Change Its Diet, Supercomputers Reveal

Bacteria inside your mouth drastically change how they act when you're diseased, according to research using supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). Scientists say these surprising findings might lead to better ways to prevent or even reverse the gum disease periodontitis, ... Read More

Social networking is key to helping bugs spread, study shows

Bugs that can co-operate best with each other are most likely to be able to jump to new species, including humans, a new study shows.

Bacteria interact by releasing molecules to help them adapt to their environment – for example, when killing competing infections in their victim. They co-ord... Read More

Seals Brought Tuberculosis to Americas

Ancient bacterial genome sequences collected from human remains in Peru suggest that seals first gave tuberculosis (TB) to humans in the Americas.

Modern TB strains found in North and South America are closely related to strains from Europe, suggesting that the Spaniards introduced the diseas... Read More

Scientists Choose Sides In Safety Debate Over Lab-Made Pathogens

A smoldering debate about whether or not researchers should ever deliberately create superflu strains and other risky germs in the interest of science has flared once again.

Proponents of the work say that in order to protect the public from the next naturally occurring pandemic, they have to... Read More

The viruses that spread antibiotic resistance

Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and in the great war between humans and pathogenic bacteria they can act as allies for both sides. Phages that destroy their host bacteria can be used as antimicrobial therapy, complementing or replacing antibiotics. On the other hand as phages ar... Read More

U.S. biosafety experts watch every step in care of Ebola patients

A U.S. hospital caring for two Americans carrying the deadly Ebola virus has tapped biosafety experts to ensure doctors, nurses and other staff do everything needed to prevent the virus from escaping from an isolation ward in Atlanta.

The two patients, humanitarian aid workers who became infe... Read More

ASM Live at ICAAC - The Live Internet Talk Show

Participate in ASM Live at ICAAC 2014 in Washington, D.C., where we will be live streaming video interviews of select presenters with host Read More

Experts question value of common superbug control practices

The jury is still out on the effectiveness of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) superbug control policies in hospitals, according to leading infectious disease experts. In particular, screening and isolating infected patients -- which have long been regarded as the gold standard ... Read More
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