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Ancient buried treasure found in daisy seeds

By tracing the evolutionary origin of a drug-like protein ring found in sunflowers, Australian and US scientists have discovered a diverse, 18-million-year-old group of buried proteins in daisy seeds.

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, working with academics from The Universi... Read More

Airborne Environmental Isolate #2

An unknown airborne environmental isolate on Mueller-Hinton agar exhibiting a single circular colony. White hyphal growth on the outer edges of the mold colony, where spores have not yet developed, surrounding the green and yellow grainy spore formation in the center of the colony with exudate ... Read More

Engineers design ‘living materials’ - Hybrid materials combine bacterial cells with nonliving elements that can conduct electricity or emit light

Inspired by natural materials such as bone — a matrix of minerals and other substances, including living cells — MIT engineers have coaxed bacterial cells to produce biofilms that can incorporate nonliving materials, such as gold nanoparticles and quantum dots.

These “living materials” combin... Read More

Airborne Environmental Isolate #3

An unknown airborne environmental isolate on Mueller-Hinton agar exhibiting a single circular colony. White hyphal growth on the outer edges of the mold colony, where spores have not yet developed, surrounding the red/pink grainy spore formation in the center of the colony. This sample grew at ... Read More

Scientists develop world’s first light-activated antimicrobial surface that also works in the dark

Researchers at UCL have developed a new antibacterial material which has potential for cutting hospital acquired infections. The combination of two simple dyes with nanoscopic particles of gold is deadly to bacteria when activated by light - even under modest indoor lighting. And in a first for ... Read More

New 'gut bacteria' clinical study could help reduce side-effects of radiotherapy

Researchers will examine the role of gut bacteria in influencing the side-effects patients experience after radiotherapy, in the first clinical study of its type.

The study will be carried out by researchers at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Tru... Read More

Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

Bacterial mats, golden brown in color, seen at the outer edges of Chromatic Pools. The blue water in the center is the hottest water at ~199 F and cooling to ambient the farther you get from the center. Cyanobacteria grow around 163 F or lower. Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 162 - Desert Dwellers Densify Dunes

This episode: Spraying cyanobacteria could turn deserts into useful land!


(9.3 MB, 10.13 minutes)


Show notes: 
Ne... Read More

Risk of dengue fever epidemic in Europe

The risk of dengue fever beginning to spread in Europe is imminent. According to researchers from Umeå University, this is no longer just an issue for the scientific community but also for politicians and policy makers, who need to be prepared and develop preventive measures.

With a changing ... Read More

Bacillus subtilis

Streak plate isolation showing colonial morphology of Bacillus subtilis on trypticase soy agar (TSA) incubated for 24 hours at 37oC. Note the rough and dry/matte texture characteristic of this organism’s growth. Read More

Rotavirus Activates Lymphocytes from Non-Obese Diabetic Mice by Triggering Toll-Like Receptor 7 Signaling and Interferon Production in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

It has been proposed that rotavirus infection promotes the progression of genetically-predisposed children to type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease marked by infiltration of activated lymphocytes into pancreatic islets. Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice provide a model for the human disease.... Read More

The Way You’re Born Can Mess With the Microbes You Need to Survive

Throughout the animal kingdom, mothers transfer microbes to their young while giving birth. Different species of tadpoles acquire specific skin bacteria from mother frogs even though they all live in the same pond with the same bacterial background. Emerging chicken eggs get inoculated with micr... Read More

Oral Bacteria and Cancer

Over a number of years, epidemiological studies established several well-defined risk factors for cancer, including age, heredity, diet, tobacco use, chronic viral infections, and inflammation. Paradoxically, the success of these studies left little room for incorporation of any new factors or c... Read More

Ancient whodunit may be solved: The microbes did it!

Methane-producing microbes may be responsible for the largest mass extinction in Earth’s history.

Evidence left at the crime scene is abundant and global: Fossil remains show that sometime around 252 million years ago, about 90 percent of all species on Earth were suddenly wiped out — by far ... Read More

By Chance and Necessity: The Role of the Cytoskeleton in the Genesis of Eukaryotes

One of the most exciting and enduring obscurities of biology lies in the early stages of the evolution of “our” eukaryotic cells (Figure 1). The endosymbiotic theory accounts well for the present existence of the mitochondrial and chloroplast organelles of eukaryotes. Although there is evidence ... Read More

Phage 'cocktail' wipes out 99 percent of E. coli in meat, spinach

Treating food products with select bacteriophages - viruses that target and kill bacteria - could significantly reduce concentrations of E. coli, a Purdue University study shows.

An injection of bacteriophages - also known informally as "phages" - nearly eradicated a toxin-producing strain of... Read More

Unknown floor isolate

Partial isolate of an unknown organism on trypticase soy agar exhibiting spreading and an irregular-rhizoid form with lobate margins. The pigment is opaque white-beige with a mucoid surface over most of the colony. A dry, dull, matte surface appears toward the outer edges of the colony. The s... Read More

Bacterial Gut Biome May Guide Colon Cancer Progression

Colorectal cancer develops in what is probably the most complex environment in the human body, a place where human cells cohabitate with a colony of approximately 10 trillion bacteria, most of which are unknown. At the 2014 American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in San Diego, re... Read More

Unknown Floor isolate #2

Partial isolate of an unknown organism on trypticase soy agar exhibiting spreading and mounding in an irregular-rhizoid form with lobate margins. The colony exhibited an opaque yellow-orange pigment with a mucoid surface. This sample was obtained from a floor swab and incubated at 37°C. Read More

Reprogrammed Bacteria Build Self-Healing ‘Living Materials’

How handy would it be if, instead of taking your broken circuit board to the Genius Bar (again), you could just prompt it to heal itself? That’s the futuristic possibility researchers have recently inched ever so slightly toward, with the development of hybrid “living materials” made from bacter... Read More

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