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University of Chicago Microbiologists Prepare for Move to New Laboratory

On Dec. 1, 2009, the United States Department of Energy notified the University of Chicago Medical Center that it had full approval to “commence research operations” at the newly constructed Howard T. Ricketts Laboratory, operated by the Medical Center to study the organisms that cause infectiou... Read More

Novel Nanotechnology Heals Abscesses Caused by Resistant Staph Bacteria

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have developed a new approach for treating and healing skin abscesses caused by bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. The study appears in the journal PLoS One.

Abscesses are deep skin infections that often resist anti... Read More

New, Virulent Strain of MRSA Poses Renewed Antibiotic Resistance Concerns

The often feared and sometimes deadly infections caused by MRSA -- methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus -- are now moving out of hospitals and emerging as an even more virulent strain in community settings and on athletic teams, and raising new concerns about antibiotic resistance.

Rig... Read More

Mystery Solved: Scientists Now Know How Smallpox Kills

A team of researchers working in a high containment laboratory at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, GA, have solved a fundamental mystery about smallpox that has puzzled scientists long after the natural disease was eradicated by vaccination.: they know how it kills us. ... Read More

How to Cure 1 Billion People?--Defeat Neglected Tropical Diseases

The poorest people are not only poor. They are also chronically sick, making it harder for them to escape poverty. A new global initiative may break the vicious cycle:

A group of seven tropical diseases, mostly caused by parasitic worms, afflict a billion impoverished people worldwide. They s... Read More

Fungal Footage Fosters Foresight Into Plant, Animal Disease

Mold and mildew may be doomed. Researchers are closer to understanding how these and other fungi grow. "Fungi have a big impact on our dinner plate," said Dr. Brian Shaw, Texas AgriLife Research plant pathologist. "We tend to think that getting food on the table is easy. But fungi are major dise... Read More

Smallpox in New York City, 1947

Millions of New Yorkers were immunized against smallpox within a few weeks in April 1947. The stimulus for this mass immunization was the importation of smallpox by a businessman who had acquired the disease during his travels. While we are in the middle of a massive influenza immunization campa... Read More

Histoplasma capsulatum in mitral valve

Histoplasma capsulatum in mitral valve. Yeasts and rare hyphal growth in vivo Read More

Bacteria found to thrive on frontline anti-T.B. drug

The war pitting researchers and clinicians against a growing array of tuberculosis bacteria strains that are resistant to one of more antibiotics has taken a disturbing turn.

U.S. and Chinese researchers reported Monday a strain of bacteria that is not only immune to one of the main drugs in ... Read More

New Filling, Cooling and Storage System May Prevent Bacterial Growth and Prolong Shelf Life of Orange Juice

Researchers in Brazil have estimated the growth timeline of a bacterium that causes orange juice spoilage during shelf life (approximately 6 months) and developed a safe and inexpensive filling, cooling, and storage protocol that inhibits bacterial growth and offers an alternative to other propo... Read More

Pomegranates: Latest Weapon in the Fight Against MRSA

Pomegranates have already been hailed as a super-food but a team of scientists from Kingston University in South West London has found a new use for the deep red fruit. The team, led by Professor Declan Naughton, has discovered that the rind can be turned into an ointment for treating MRSA and o... Read More

Biology Examples Give MIT Students a New Perspective on Chemistry

When Allison Hamilos came to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology last year, she dreaded having to take the mandatory general chemistry course for freshmen. Eyeing a future in medicine, she couldn’t see much point in learning chemistry.

“I didn’t like chemistry at all in high school,” s... Read More

Very Sick, and Now a Curiosity

Michelle Barnes never imagined that her vacation to Uganda would make her a medical celebrity.

Ms. Barnes, 44, became ill in January 2008, a few days after returning home to Golden, Colo. At first, she seemed to have a typical case of traveler’s diarrhea, but she soon worsened. She broke out ... Read More

Assessment and Thanks as Flu Wave Ebbs in U.S.

“And, of course,” added Kathleen Sebelius, after summing up the accomplishments of eight months of battling swine flu, “we’ve taught everyone how to sneeze.”

With that, Ms. Sebelius, the health and human services secretary, bent her elbow across her face and sent a delicate imitation of a vi... Read More

Scientists Use Bacteria to Power Simple Machines

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Northwestern University, Evanston, have discovered that common bacteria can turn microgears when suspended in a solution, providing insights for design of bio-inspired dynamically adaptive materials for energy.
... Read More

The Sound of Science (video)

Molecular Microbiology Holiday Skit 2009. It looks like some students from the Tufts Molecular Biology and Microbiology department were inspired by the holidays to bring us this great video skit called "The Sound of Science."
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Third patient tests positive for anthrax

A third patient is being treated for the effects of anthrax following the death of another drug user in Glasgow, health chiefs have confirmed.

The patient being treated at the city's Glasgow Royal Infirmary is in a critical condition. One male patient died last week and the female patient und... Read More

Heme channel found

Scientists at Washington University have isolated a channel that shuttles the vital but vulnerable heme molecule across biological membranes.

In some ways a cell in your body or an organelle in that cell is like an ancient walled town. Life inside either depends critically on the intelligence... Read More

Dutch Cull First 40,000-Goats To Counter Q-Fever Outbreak

The culling of thousands of pregnant goats and sheep carrying a disease that killed 6-people earlier this year, was begun by the Dutch government on Monday.

While, it is rare for humans to contract Q-fever, a bacterial sickness, however, the unusual outbreak in the Netherlands has continued t... Read More

New pill simplifies HIV patient treatment

A new antiretroviral treatment currently available in Europe and North America will be available in Australia from January 1, combining three existing medicines in one tablet.

Atripla — which controls HIV by stopping the virus multiplying — will be included on the pharmaceutical benefits sche... Read More

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