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Eukaryotic phytoplankton is now believed to account for almost 50 percent of the ocean’s carbon fixation

"Almost half of the ocean’s carbon fixation is done by eukaryotic phytoplankton, despite the fact that their presence is significantly less than the more abundant blue-green algae known as cyanobacteria.

Cyanobacteria, that grow in vast numbers in the sunlit surface waters of the oceans (the ... Read More

Superbug - Journalist Maryn McKenna discusses MRSA

Maryn McKenna, a contributing writer for the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota and media fellow at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, discusses MRSA in this promotional video for her new book "Superbug: The Fatal Menace of MRSA."


 ... Read More

Cryptococcus neoformans

Cryptococcus neoformans in mash preparation of mouse brain. Note large capsule and narrow budding isthmus Read More

Microbe gold: Arizona State researcher investigates where oil comes from

While most of the dead material in the ocean is recycled by bacteria, lipids are tough, fat-like molecules that "tend to be the least desirable to eat," says Everett Shock, a biogeochemist at Arizona State University. They generally get passed up and fall to the seafloor, where they become burie... Read More

West Nile Virus: The Missing Link

New York City isn't exactly an oasis for wildlife, but its public-health officials are all too familiar with zoonotic diseases, which jump from animals to humans. Ten years before H1N1 erupted among students and killed a principal at an intermediate school in Queens, N.Y., another mysterious ill... Read More

Bio-lab on a microchip

Drugs alone can't stop disease in sub-Saharan Africa: We need diagnostic tools to match. TED Senior Fellow Frederick Balagadde shows how we can multiply the power and availability of an unwieldy, expensive diagnostic lab -- by miniaturizing it to the size of a chip.
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Sight of sick person can trigger immune response

You may cower in disgust when someone sneezes near you, but just seeing that person may make your immune system prepare for battle, a new study suggests.

Research published in the journal Psychological Science found that when people viewed a slide show of photos depicting symptoms of infectio... Read More

Doctors want you to remember polio and diphtheria

Too many American children do not receive recommended childhood vaccines for illnesses such as polio, measles, mumps, diphtheria and pertussis that were once thought to have been eradicated but are making a comeback in some areas. According to data from 2008, almost one-quarter of children ages ... Read More

Another small step for man, but a giant leap for microbial-kind?

Seems the microbes we share spaceship Earth with have figured out the best way to run a low-cost, no frills space program. Makes me wonder if bacteria from Buzz Aldrin (met him one time & shook his hand, so in a sense, I've gotten closer to the Moon than a lotta folks!) or Neil Armstrong are se... Read More

HPV screening might trump Pap tests in detecting cervical cancer, but false positives remain a concern

The Pap test has been enormously successful at reducing cervical cancer deaths, but it can miss early signs of malignancy, allowing undetected cases to become invasive.

New research from a large-scale screening program shows that testing the DNA from the human papillomavirus (HPV) in a sample... Read More

China Lifts Ban on Visitors Who Are H.I.V. Positive

Days before travelers worldwide are to begin arriving for Shanghai’s world exposition, China has lifted a two-decade ban on travel to the country by people who carry the virus that causes AIDS or who have other sexually transmitted diseases.

The action also removed a longstanding ban on tra... Read More

Putting Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Into Reverse

The use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections causes a continual and vicious cycle in which antibiotic treatment leads to the emergence and spread of resistant strains, forcing the use of additional drugs leading to further multi-drug resistance.

But what if it doesn't have to be that ... Read More

Glowing bacteria stands out

A scientist at Macquarie University is working with a Sydney hospital to develop a device, known as the Gated Auto-synchronous Luminescence Detector (GALD), which could radically improve the means of detection for infection-causing bacteria.

Physicist Dr Russell Connally has spent the past th... Read More

Bacteria makes cocaine-killer drug

A new medicine that can break down cocaine and its metabolic products 1000 times faster than the human organism has been created. The enzyme derived from coca plant dwelling bacteria can be used to treat drug overdose.

So far doctors have no efficient way to mediate the toxicity of cocaine an... Read More

Bonnie Bassler discovers Quorum sensing (video)

Bonnie Bassler explains her breakthrough discovery. Read More

Disrupting Cellular Communication - James Cameron style

Students at Rutgers University-Camden created this mash-up of Avatar with the focus of their Spring 2010 term paper for their General Microbiology class. Read More

Design and Testing of Protein Combinatorial Libraries

In this video Stephen L. Mayo, Bren Professor of Biology and Chemistry, California Institute of Technology, discusses the challenges of designing new proteins that fold into a particular structure or perform a particular function. One method is to computationally design a protein based solely up... Read More

Genetics researcher Francisco Ayala discusses his life, his work and creationism

Evolutionary geneticist Francisco Ayala wasn't always attracted to life in the laboratory. As a young man in Spain, Ayala was ordained as a Dominican priest. Within a year, though, he gave up it up to study genetics at Columbia University. Since then, Ayala's research has focused on parasitic pr... Read More

This is the future of computing

The title isn't hype - upon reading this an entire world of possibilities stretched out before me. Limitless potential, just hopefully not for SkyNet - from what I've seen that machine is nothing but trouble . . . Read More

Sugar cane industry in Mexico threatened by Orange Rust

Mexico's National Service for Plant Health, Safety and Agri-Food Quality (SENASICA) has confirmed the presence of orange rust of sugar cane in the Municipalities of Villacomaltitlan, Tuzantan, Huehuetan, Mazatan y Huixtla, State of Chiapas; in Othon P. Blanco, State of Quintana Roo and in Ursulo... Read More

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