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New technology enables machines to detect microscopic pathogens in water

Detecting one of the world's most common pathogens in drinking water soon may no longer be bottle-necked under a laboratory microscope.

Pathogens, meet technology. A new system developed by Texas AgriLife Research automatically scans a water sample and points to potential pathogens much faste... Read More

Great news, if I can observe sick people via binoculars or telescope

How would this affect hypochondriacs I wonder? Probably degrade their mental state whilst simultaneously boosting their immune response. Maybe videos of sick people should be shown in hospitals too, unless there is a point where the positive effect drops off. Either way, interesting stuff. ... Read More

Bacteria versus Virus - the age old struggle

Fascinating piece, something I had never really considered before - the idea that bacteria can get sick, similar to the idea can soap get dirty eh? Hopefully the anti-vaccine crowd won't get all up in arms about this, they've done enough damage in the human population already. Also begs the qu... Read More

German scientists develop fast-acting germ killer

A new fast-acting disinfectant that is effective against bacteria, viruses and other germs could help stop the spread of deadly infections in hospitals, German scientists said on Wednesday.

Researchers from the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin said they had developed a fast-acting, practical f... Read More

Sheep Virus Life Cycle That Causes Malignant Catarrhal Fever Explained

The mysterious life cycle of a sheep virus that causes malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) has been discovered by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their university collaborators -- the first step in developing a vaccine against the disease.

Microbiologist Hong Li and veterinary ... Read More

This is your brain on Cryptococcus: Pathogenic fungus loves your brain sugar

Highly dangerous Cryptococcus fungi love sugar and will consume it anywhere because it helps them reproduce. In particular, they thrive on a sugar called inositol which is abundant in the human brain and spinal cord.

To borrow inositol from a person's brain, the fungi have an expanded set of ... Read More

Speculation Surrounding Sporulation in the Mycobacteria

Tim Sampson, a graduate student at Emory University in the Microbiology and Molecular Genetics program, looks at two research papers with conflicting conclusions about the presence of endospores in very late stationary phase cultures of Mycobacterium marinum, a common model for acute Mycobacte... Read More

In Changing Climate, Math Model Analyzes Coral Surface Bacteria

Cornell researchers have created mathematical models based on interactions between species in coral reef communities that may provide insight as to why certain bacteria may help cause the reef to become bleached and ultimately destroyed.

The models and their implications for the overall healt... Read More

New Insects, Bacteria Uncovered in Dinosaur-Era Amber Deposit

A description of a 95-million-year-old amber deposit—the first major discovery of its kind from the African continent—is adding new fungus, insects, spiders, nematodes, and even bacteria to an ecosystem that had been shared by dinosaurs. In addition, the amber deposit may provide fresh insights ... Read More

Getting Rid of Norovirus

Norovirus has been in the news of late for sickening passengers on cruise ships, closing a middle school and postponing a college swim meet.

The virus, which causes severe gastrointestinal symptoms, has also been in my house. I most likely contracted the virus last week and have been shocked ... Read More

Microsporum gypseum microconidia

Microsporum gypseum microconidia. Unstained interference phase microscope (1000X) Read More

Structure of Key Protein in Common HIV Subgroup Uncovered

Scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have provided the first-ever glimpse of the structure of a key protein -- gp120 -- found on the surface of a specific subgroup of the human immunodeficiency virus, HIV-1. In addition, they demonstrated that a particular antibody to... Read More

New kids on the molecular block

Great news here - the sort of thing that should lead on CNN or Fox but never will in my lifetime. However, since this advance may significantly extend my lifetime by subduing a variety of gnarly diseases, perhaps I'll eventually be proven wrong. Read More

Will the iPad Replace Your Lab Notebook?

The release of the iPad this week may bring the long-expected replacement of the paper-bound lab notebook by electronic notebooks one step closer. But are scientists, particularly PIs, comfortable with electronic lab notebooks?

The rise of the tablets
The concept of an electronic lab noteboo... Read More

Hostile volcanic lake teems with life

Argentinian investigators have found flamingos and mysterious microbes living in an alkaline lagoon nestled inside a volcano in the Andes. The organisms, exposed to arsenic and poisonous gases, could shed light on how life began on Earth, and their hardiness to extreme conditions may hold the ke... Read More

Ecosystems under threat from ocean acidification

Acidification of the oceans as a result of increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide could have significant effects on marine ecosystems, according to Michael Maguire presenting at the Society for General Microbiology's spring meeting in Edinburgh this week. Postgraduate researcher Mr Magu... Read More

BacterioFiles Episode 9

In this show, I report on four exciting stories: bacterial fingerprints, bacteria in space, fungi that swap genes, and bacteria fighting for resources.




























(10 MB, 11 minutes)

Post questions or comments here,... Read More

The secret, social lives of bacteria: Exclusive interview with Bonnie Bassler

In 2002, bearing her microscope on a microbe that lives in the gut of fish, Bonnie Bassler isolated an elusive molecule called AI-2, which showed not only that almost all bacteria can communicate -- but that they do so all the time. (Watch her 2009 TEDTalk!) The TED Blog interviewed Bassler ... Read More

Test uses DNA to detect Lyme disease

Sin Hang Lee, Ph.D., a Milford Hospital pathologist has developed a test to positively diagnose Lyme disease, and to identify the bacterium that causes it within days of infection.

That is a major advance in treating a disease that is common in the region but difficult to diagnose with standa... Read More

TWiV 76: XMRV with Professor Stephen Goff



On episode #76 of the podcast This Week in Virology, Vincent speaks with Stephen Goff about the origin of the retrovirus XMRV and its association with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome.


Read More

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