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Protecting against Hendra virus

It was discovered in 1994 as a virus 'hosted' by fruit bats and lethal to horses and humans. Watch our profile of the Hendra virus, a zoonotic disease that has claimed the lives of seven people. Read More

Longer Screening Intervals Possible With HPV-Based Tests

A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden finds that testing for human papilloma virus (HPV) allows for longer time between screening tests when compared to cytology-based testing. The study is published in the scientific journal British Medical Journal (BMJ).

Cervical screening progra... Read More

In first moments of infection, a division and a decision

Using technologies and computational modeling that trace the destiny of single cells, researchers describe for the first time the earliest stages of fate determination among white blood cells called T lymphocytes, providing new insights that may help drug developers create more effective, longer... Read More

UNC research demonstrates “guided missile” strategy to kill hidden HIV

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have deployed a potential new weapon against HIV – a combination therapy that targets HIV-infected cells that standard therapies cannot kill.

Using mouse models that have immune systems composed of human cells, researchers led by J. Victor Garcia, PhD... Read More

Soybean compound may inhibit HIV

A compound found in soybeans can be used in new treatments to inhibit the deadly HIV infection, scientists claim. Read More

10 Extreme--And Extremely Pretty--Close Ups of Bacteria and Plants

Bacteria has the virtue (and sometimes the vice) of being able to grow at incredible speeds—some strains can double in cell count in as little as four minutes. Fernan Federici, a postdoctoral student at the University of Cambridge, is pioneering the art of capturing the split-second process. And... Read More

Nanovaccines that need no-refrigeration could curb diseases in remote areas

A new kind of single-dose vaccine that comes in a nasal spray and doesn't require refrigeration could dramatically alter the public health landscape - get more people vaccinated around the world and address the looming threats of emerging and re-emerging diseases. Researchers presented the lates... Read More

When bacteria fight back

Q&A with Dr. David Hooper on the rising threat from drug-resistant microbes. Read More

Narrow-Spectrum UV Light May Reduce Surgical Infections

Despite major efforts to keep operating rooms sterile, surgical wound infections remain a serious and stubborn problem, killing up to 8,200 patients a year in the U.S. A study by Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers suggests that narrow-spectrum ultraviolet (UV) light could dram... Read More

Decoded DNA Could Help Fight Parasitic Hookworms

Going barefoot in parts of Africa, Asia, and South America contributes to hookworm infections, which afflict an estimated 700 million of the world’s poor. The parasitic worm lives in the soil and enters the body through the feet. By feeding on victims’ blood, the worms cause anemia and, in child... Read More

Bacteria Recycle Broken DNA: Modern Bacteria Can Add DNA from Creatures Long-Dead to Its Own

From a bacteria’s perspective the environment is one big DNA waste yard. Researchers have now shown that bacteria can take up small as well as large pieces of old DNA from this scrapheap and include it in their own genome. This discovery may have major consequences – both in connection with resi... Read More

Estrogen-Eating Bacteria = Safer Water

Usually, when you mention bacteria in connection with water, it’s a bad thing. But one Texas A&M engineering researcher believes the right bacteria are a natural weapon for fighting an emerging water contaminant: estrogen.

Increasingly sensitive methods of screening water for polluting substa... Read More

Bacteria in drinking water are key to keeping it clean

Bacteria commonly found in drinking water creates conditions which enable other- potentially harmful – bacteria to thrive, says research by engineers from the University of Sheffield.

The research, published in the latest issue of Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, points the way to ... Read More

In Memoriam: Gareth Thomas (1932–2014)

Gareth Thomas, founder of Berkeley Lab’s National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) and one of the world’s foremost experts on electron microscopy, passed away on February 7. He was 81.

Click on 'source' to read more. Read More

Genetic Defect May Confer Resistance to Certain Viral Infections

A National Institutes of Health (NIH) study reports that a rare genetic disease, while depleting patients of infection-fighting antibodies, may actually protect them from certain severe or recurrent viral infections. Researchers found that HIV and influenza viruses replicate in the cells of peop... Read More

Transforming ARV treatment

Professor Yasien Sayed, research leader of the HIV Proteins Research Thrust, Protein Structure-Function Research Unit in the School of Molecular and Cell Biology, has led his group to international acclaim by solving the three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of the South African HIV-1 subtyp... Read More

Equine gut bacteria probed in pilot study

The gut bacteria in horses are being researched at the University of Pennsylvania, in a series of projects that scientists hope will ultimately benefit animal and human health.

Researchers at the university’s School of Veterinary Medicine are leading five pilot projects as part of the wider i... Read More

Micro-capsules and bacteria to be used in self-healing concrete

A new research project involving researchers from Bath aims to develop novel self-healing concrete that uses an inbuilt immune system to close its own wounds and prevent deterioration.

The life of concrete structures is reduced when the material cracks and water is able to get at the steel re... Read More

Worms and Hot Baths: Novel Approaches to Treating Autism

A new study shows that two unusual treatment approaches may have beneficial effects on the symptoms of autism in children and adults with the disorder. Using a hot bath to raise body temperature and thereby mimic the effects of infection, or using worm eggs to stimulate the production of immunor... Read More

Recruitment Launched for New Microscopic Museum Mobile Gaming Program at AMNH

The American Museum of Natural History has began recruiting for this new, free, spring, after school program for high school students. Please help them out by sharing the word with interested teens:

Did you know that the Twa, a group of people in the Congo, rarely get cavities or that Japanes... Read More

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