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Crowdsourced Microbes Heading to Station

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"Crowdsourced" Microbes Heading to the Space Station

NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot talks with Dr. David Coil about Project MERCCURI, which will study a "crowdsourced" collection of microbial samples scheduled to launch to the International Space Station aboard the SpaceX-3 mission.

Follow along with Project MERCCURI at: http://spacemicro... Read More

Remembering a Microbial Hero™: The Late, Great Abigail Salyers.

Here I remember a person who a great deal of influence on my views about microbiology in the classroom, and the laboratory: the late Abigail Salyers. RIP, Abigail. Read More

Annals of the Malaria War: Move over Angelina Jolie

We’re driving on a dirt road and my interpreter, one of the friendliest guys I’ve ever met, is absorbed in a conversation with a health worker in our group. Cornfields and rice paddies paint the landscape chartreuse. Donkey carts and herds of goats swerve into the plants when we rumble past. The... Read More

New More Effective Antimicrobials Might Rise From Old

By tinkering with their chemical structures, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have essentially re-invented a class of popular antimicrobial drugs, restoring and in some cases, expanding or improving, their effectiveness against drug-resistant pathogens in... Read More

Vaccine study reveals link between immunity and cells' starvation response

Scientists at Emory Vaccine Center have found a link between immunity induced by vaccination and an ancient way that cells adapt to scarcity, a link that could help researchers develop vaccines against challenging infections such as HIV or malaria.

Researchers studying immune responses to the... Read More

Antarctica's Deep Lake: A Frigid Home for Steadfast Archaea

Some time ago, we asked this Talmudic Question: Can you think of a place on Earth where there is free water but no microbes? (A sterile flask of nutrient broth in a lab, the insides of the body, or an IV bag in a hospital don't count.) Someone answered that perhaps deep in Antarctica there would... Read More

Establishing guides for molecular counting using fluorescent proteins

To know how many proteins assemble together at the nanoscale is fundamental for understanding protein function. Sometimes, proteins must be in an "oligomeric" state to be functional, although "oligomerization" of certain proteins can also lead to diseases. The ability to determine protein stoich... Read More

Tamiflu-resistant influenza: parsing the genome for the culprits

It doesn’t take long for the flu virus to outsmart Tamiflu. EPFL scientists have developed a tool that reveals the mutations that make the virus resistant, and they have identified new mutations that may render ineffective one of the few treatments currently available on the market.

Tamiflu ... Read More

Oil- and metal-munching microbes dominate deep sandstone formations

Halomonas are a hardy breed of bacteria. They can withstand heat, high salinity, low oxygen, utter darkness and pressures that would kill most other organisms. These traits enable these microbes to eke out a living in deep sandstone formations that also happen to be useful for hydrocarbon extrac... Read More

My Global Video Challenge

MY GLOBAL VIDEO CHALLENGE (HOW MY SCIENCE AFFECTS MY COMMUNITY.)
Sometimes I wonder why diseases like typhoid fever and malaria lingers in West Africa and antibiotic as well as anti-malaria usage rises to resistant levels, until I met this community during one of my outreach trips. It was unima... Read More

Scientists unlock a ‘microbial Pompeii’

An international team of researchers including scientists from the University of York have discovered a ‘microbial Pompeii’ preserved on the teeth of skeletons around 1,000 years old.

The key to the discovery is the dental calculus (plaque) which preserves bacteria and microscopic particles o... Read More

Antimicrobial Properties

The emergence of antimicrobial resistance, coupled with the availability of fewer antifungal agents with fungicidal actions, prompted this present study to characterize Candida species in our environment and determine the effectiveness of virgin coconut oil as an antifungal agent on these specie... Read More

A Solution for a San Diego Cove’s Constant Odor: Bacteria

Depending upon whom you ask, the smell that has plagued La Jolla Cove has been “putrid,” “noxious” or “like the East River used to smell,” for quite a while. Nose-pinching is commonplace.


But now, the stench of bird guano emanating from the cliffs in the seaside neighborhood has become, off... Read More

USF-led study suggests some chronic fatigue syndrome patients may benefit from anti-herpesvirus drug treatment

Many experts believe that chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has several root causes including some viruses. Now, lead scientists Shara Pantry, Maria Medveczky and Peter Medveczky of the University of South Florida’s Morsani College of Medicine, along with the help of several collaborating scientist... Read More

Bent Out of Shape: Stressed Bacteria Accumulate Misfolded Proteins and Stop Growing

Whether a man, a mouse or a microbe, stress is bad for you. Experiments in bacteria by molecular biologists in Peter Chien’s lab at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others at MIT, have uncovered the mechanism that translates stress, such as exposure to extreme temperature, into bloc... Read More

Bacterial Bubble Hitchhikers Could Help Keep Greenhouse Gas in Check

Seafloor-dwelling bacteria may hitch a ride on methane bubbles seeping from deep-sea vents, preventing the methane from reaching the atmosphere by eating it up, new research suggests.

The findings, presented here today (Dec. 9) at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union, could he... Read More

Bird Vaccine for West Nile Virus

University of British Columbia researchers have developed a vaccine that may halt the spread of West Nile Virus (WNV) among common and endangered bird species.

WNV, a mosquito borne pathogen, arrived in North America in 1999 and is now endemic across the continent. In 2012 alone, WNV killed 2... Read More

No cases of MERS virus among haj pilgrims so far: ministry

Saudi Arabia has so far recorded no cases of the deadly MERS coronavirus among pilgrims in the holy city of Mecca for the annual haj season, the Ministry of Health said on Saturday.

The death toll from the respiratory virus in the kingdom, where the strain emerged last year, has reached 51, a... Read More

MERS-CoV genome found in dromedary camels

Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), first identified in the fall of 2012 in a Saudi Arabian patient, has since infected over 160 individuals, causing 71 deaths. Identifying the source of infection is important for efforts to prevent further infections. Recently two studie... Read More

U.S. flu activity low, but Los Angeles confirms a women died

U.S. influenza activity remains low, but Los Angeles County confirmed its first death -- a woman with an underlying medical condition, an official says.

Dr. Jonathan E. Fielding, director of public health and health officer, says the woman resided in the San Fernando Valley and the particular... Read More

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