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Discovery May Aid Vaccine Design for Common Form of Malaria

A form of malaria common in India, Southeast Asia and South America attacks human red blood cells by clamping down on the cells with a pair of proteins, new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has revealed.

The study provides details that will help scientists des... Read More

Penicillin equally effective as ‘big gun’ antibiotics for treating less severe childhood pneumonia

Children hospitalized for pneumonia have similar outcomes, including length of stay and costs, regardless of whether they are treated with “big gun” antibiotics such as ceftriaxone or cefotaxime or more narrowly focused antibiotics such as ampicillin or penicillin, according to a Vanderbilt stud... Read More

First fungal farmers found harvesting bacteria

It's a mould breaker. Researchers have discovered the first fungus that behaves like a farmer.

We already know that soil fungi can help bacteria travel quickly from A to B. The fungal filaments provide favourable conditions for the bacteria, and so act as "highways" through the soil. But thes... Read More

Anti-fungal drug increases flu susceptibility

Researchers have found that a commonly used anti-fungal treatment increases susceptibility to severe influenza infection in mice. This treatment deactivates an important protein that protects against viral infections such as influenza.

Amphotericin B is an important anti-fungal treatment for ... Read More

Staying Healthy May Mean Learning To Love Our Microbiomes

Not so long ago, most people thought that the only good microbe was a dead microbe.

But then scientists started to realize that even though some bugs can make us sick and even kill us, most don't.

In fact, in the past decade attitudes about the bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microbes l... Read More

Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Social Networks

When astronauts launch into space, a microbial entourage follows. And the sheer number of these followers would give celebrities on Twitter a run for their money. The estimate is that normal, healthy adults have ten times as many microbial cells as human cells within their bodies; countless more... Read More

History: Great myths die hard

Finding that part of the story of Louis Pasteur's rabies vaccine is false, Héloïse Dufour and Sean Carroll explore how science fables are born, spread and die.

John Snow's ending of London's 1854 cholera outbreak, Joseph Lister's development of antiseptic surgery, Alexander Fleming's inventio... Read More

Next to You on the Subway

Norman R. Pace, a microbiologist at the University of Colorado Boulder, pioneered the use of DNA to study microbes. He has searched for extremophiles (organisms that can exist in extreme environments) in the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park and once descended in the submersible Alvin to ... Read More

Rutgers Scientists Discover Molecules that Show Promise for New Anti-Flu Medicines

A new way to attack flu viruses is taking shape in laboratories at Rutgers University, where scientists have identified chemical agents that block the virus’s ability to replicate itself in cell culture.

These novel compounds show promise for a new class of antiviral medicines to fight much-f... Read More

Progress Against Hepatitis C, a Sneaky Virus

Forty years ago, a beloved neighbor was bedridden for weeks at a time with a mysterious ailment. She knew only that it involved her liver and that she must never drink alcohol, which would make things worse.

It was decades before the cause of these debilitating flare-ups was discovered: a vir... Read More

FIRST OBSERVATION OF A HUMAN HAT, KEY PROTEINS IN NUMEROUS PATHOLOGIES

The researcher Manuel Palacín, head of the Heterogenic and Multigenic Diseases lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB), in Barcelona, is among the world’s experts in HATs (heteromeric amino acid transporters).

In humans, there are eight HAT molecules. These are associated, for ... Read More

Evolution Made Easy, Courtesy of E. Coli (blog)

Evolution is one of those enigmatic subjects we simply do not understand fully. We know it is a biological change at the genetic level that changes the overall nature of an organism. We're also sure that it requires a significant number of generations. Unfortunately, that means it is difficult t... Read More

MRSA declines are sustained in veterans hospitals nationwide

Five years after implementing a national initiative to reduce methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) rates in Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers, MRSA cases have continued to decline, according to a study in the November issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the offi... Read More

Antibiotic resistance enzyme caught in the act

Resistance to an entire class of antibiotics – aminoglycosides -- has the potential to spread to many types of bacteria, according to new biochemistry research. A mobile gene called NpmA was discovered in E. coli bacteria several years ago. Global spread of NpmA and related antibiotic resistance... Read More

"Crowdsourced" Microbes Heading to the Space Station

NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot talks with Dr. David Coil about Project MERCCURI, which will study a "crowdsourced" collection of microbial samples scheduled to launch to the International Space Station aboard the SpaceX-3 mission.

Follow along with Project MERCCURI at: http://spacemicro... Read More

Cause of salamander die-off found: Skin-eating fungus

A newly discovered fungus that feasts on the skin of amphibians is threatening to decimate a species of salamander in the Netherlands, according to new research.

Fire salamanders are one of the most recognizable salamander species in Europe, and are characterized by their distinct yellow- and... Read More

Annals of the Malaria War: Move over Angelina Jolie

We’re driving on a dirt road and my interpreter, one of the friendliest guys I’ve ever met, is absorbed in a conversation with a health worker in our group. Cornfields and rice paddies paint the landscape chartreuse. Donkey carts and herds of goats swerve into the plants when we rumble past. The... Read More

Vaccine study reveals link between immunity and cells' starvation response

Scientists at Emory Vaccine Center have found a link between immunity induced by vaccination and an ancient way that cells adapt to scarcity, a link that could help researchers develop vaccines against challenging infections such as HIV or malaria.

Researchers studying immune responses to the... Read More

Remembering a Microbial Hero™: The Late, Great Abigail Salyers.

Here I remember a person who a great deal of influence on my views about microbiology in the classroom, and the laboratory: the late Abigail Salyers. RIP, Abigail. Read More

Tamiflu-resistant influenza: parsing the genome for the culprits

It doesn’t take long for the flu virus to outsmart Tamiflu. EPFL scientists have developed a tool that reveals the mutations that make the virus resistant, and they have identified new mutations that may render ineffective one of the few treatments currently available on the market.

Tamiflu ... Read More

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