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Gut microbiota and the evolution of species

Science Magazine has recently published a study carried out by Dr. Robert Brucker and Dr. Seth R. Bordenstein from Vanderbilt University in Nashville (USA) that seems to provide clues reinforcing the “hologenome theory of evolution”. This research suggests that the gut microbiome may have a fund... Read More

Virus killing bottlenose dolphins may be jumping species, report says

The bottlenose dolphins are migrating south. So officials in New Jersey thought that they had seen the last of the strandings - animals washing onto beaches, dead or dying - in what has become the largest Atlantic Coast die-off of dolphins in memory.

But on Monday, the body of another dolphin... Read More

Bacteria Enhance Growth of Fruit Trees Up to 40 Percent

Improvement in reforestation and agriculture is possible thanks to the work of scientists in the Center of Research and Advanced Studies (Cinvestav) who use different strains of fungi and bacteria to promote development and health in trees, which have enabled them to accelerate growth of differe... Read More

TWiV 261: Giants among viruses

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Jame... Read More

The Microbes Living in Our Bodies Were Probably Once Evil Pathogens

Like pretty much all multi-cellular organisms, humans enjoy the benefits of helpful bacteria. (As you may have heard, there are more bacteria in the human body than cells.) These mutualistic microbes live within the body of a larger organism, and, like any good long-term houseguest, help out the... Read More

Black silicon slices and dices bacteria

Originally discovered by accident in the 1980s, black silicon is silicon with a surface that has been modified to feature nanoscale spike structures which give the material very low reflectivity. Researchers have now found that these spikes can also destroy a wide range of bacteria, potentially ... Read More

fungus: colony pic. of Trichophyton mentagrophytes.

this is colony pic of T. mantagrophytes grows on dermasel media after 12 days of incubation at 30'C. this study is done for our research work from superfical mycoses s suspected cases.specimens taken from trunk as skin scrapping suspected of T. corporis.microscopic pic of this colony shows p... Read More

TWiM #69: Bacterial DNA in the human genome

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloElio SchaechterJo Handelsman and Read More

TWiM 69 Letters

Gian writes:


Beloved TWiMers,


Did you see this paper in PLoS Computational Biology? It's mind-blowing. U. Maryland researchers found evidence for Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas nucleic acid integrated into human chromosomes and mitochondria, po... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 144 - Copper Chelator Calms Quicksilver

This episode: Bacteria could reduce mercury's toxicity in their environment!


(6.5 MB, 7 minutes)


Methanotrophs (bacteria that use methane for their carbon and energy) secrete siderophore-like compounds that are usually used to chelate copper and make it more bioavailable, but ... Read More

How Your Morning Commute Resembles a Fungus

In many fungi, the DNA storage compartments called nuclei are not prisoners of the cells they reside in, the way they are in animals and plants. Instead, fungal nuclei are free to move about the cabin. They flow through the joined, tube-shaped cells of fungi like busy commuters, and experience m... Read More

Scientists zero in on flu virus defences

Scientists have just got a clearer picture of the defences used by a key influenza virus to evade our immune system.

The findings reported today in the journal Science could lead to a new research approach in the holy grail of developing vaccines before new flu viruses evolve.

Influenza A/... Read More

Chemotherapy: when our intestinal bacteria provide reinforcement

Research jointly conducted by investigators at Institut Gustave Roussy, Inserm, Institut Pasteur and INRA (French National Agronomic Research Institute) has led to a rather surprising discovery on the manner in which cancer chemotherapy treatments act more effectively with the help of the intest... Read More

Merseyside red squirrels show signs of pox resistance

Red squirrels at a National Trust reserve in Merseyside have shown signs of resistance to the pox virus that has blighted the species, say researchers.

Scientists from the University of Liverpool have studied the squirrels at the Formby site for four years.

They found that 10% of its squir... Read More

Anti-fungal drug increases flu susceptibility

Researchers have found that a commonly used anti-fungal treatment increases susceptibility to severe influenza infection in mice. This treatment deactivates an important protein that protects against viral infections such as influenza.

Amphotericin B is an important anti-fungal treatment for ... Read More

Scientists think mysterious virus could be a signal of a weak immune system

Genomic analysis of transplant patients finds an opportunistic microorganism whose elevated presence could be used an indicator in treatment.

More than 260,000 Americans are alive today thanks to transplant operations that have replaced their failing kidneys, hearts, lungs or livers with hea... Read More

Fine Reading: Exploring the Microbial Dark Matter

We live in a world run by microbes, the vast majority of which we have yet to identify or name. We can only refer to them collectively as the microbial dark matter (MDM). However you define a prokaryotic species, and however you tally them once identified, there is a huge gap between the 12,000 ... Read More
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