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Including antibiotics in the list of the immaterial heritage of the UNESCO

Antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, and represents a dramatic threat for public health. Antibiotics are a common and universal good, a treasure that we must urgently protect. It is a duty for each citizen of the world. We intend to ask the UNESCO to include the antibiotics in the list... Read More

Recent data an antibiotic use and bacterial resistance

A webcast from ECDC with recent data on antibiotic use and bacterial resistance. enjoy Read More

New paper identifies virus devastating sea stars on Pacific Coast

Museum biological collections are the records of life on Earth and as such, they are frequently used to investigate serious environmental issues. When public health officials were concerned about the levels of mercury in fish and birds, for example, scientists studied museum specimens to assess ... Read More

BacterioFiles 191 - Coats Compose Current Conduits

This episode: Bacterial nanowires are made of the cells' outer membranes!


(9.75 MB, 10.6 minutes)


 


Show notes: 
News item/<... Read More

New Ebola Treatment Filters Virus Out of the Blood

Researchers say that a new device that yanks Ebola virus from the blood may have saved an infected doctor’s life.

Battling a virus is all about timing, and Ebola is no exception. Our immune systems are capable of destroying Ebola, but once in the body, the virus multiplies furiously, spreadin... Read More

How Bacteria In The Gut Help Fight Off Viruses

If it was a snake, it would have bitten us.

The secret to stopping a deadly stomach virus may be sitting right there in our guts, scientists reported Thursday in the journal Science. Or more specifically, the treatment is in our microbiome — the trillions of bacteria that inconspicuously hang... Read More

Here’s How Many Bacteria Spread Through One Kiss

First base is a great place to get your mouth microbes some new friends, finds a new study in the journal Microbiome. A ten-second French kiss can spread 80 million bacteria between mouths.

Study author Remco Kort, a professor and scientist at Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific R... Read More

Authorities Identify Highly Contagious Bird Flu Strain

Authorities found the H5N8 strain of bird flu at a poultry farm in the central Netherlands, the same highly contagious strain as found this month in Germany and which has prompted massive poultry culls in Asia.

Dutch authorities on Sunday said they had found the H5N8 strain of bird flu at a p... Read More

Five Questions About the Foraminifera

The Foraminifera ("forams") are among the largest and most abundant of all unicellular organisms. They can reach 20 cm in length and 18 cm in width, and the shells surrounding them are even bigger, up to 30 cm in length. They have existed in prodigious numbers that the remnants of their shells h... Read More

TWiV 311: Bulldogs go viral

Vincent visits the University of Georgia where he speaks with Zhen Fu and Biao He about their work on rabies virus and paramyxoviruses.


 


Host: Vincent Racaniello. Guests:  Read More

Unknown Fungal Contaminant/MAC

Unknown fungal isolated contaminant found on MAC. MAC plate was incubated for 2 months at 4 degrees C once fungal growth was seen. This colony seemed to emerge from the agar and had a 3D appearance. The center of the colony had what seemed to be hyphal growth while the edges had a hard waxy un... Read More

Unknown Fungal Contaminant/TSA #2

Two unknown airborne fungal isolated contaminant found on TSA. TSA plate was incubated for 2 months at 4 degrees C once fungal growth was seen. Concentric rings of color (pink/peach, green and white) can be seen throughout the colonies. Read More

Unknown Fungal Contaminant/TSA

Unknown airborne fungal isolated contaminant found on TSA. TSA plate was incubated for 2 months at 4 degrees C once fungal growth was seen. Concentric rings of color (pink, green and white) can be seen throughout the colony with smaller colonies seen around the white edges of the colony due to s... Read More

Salmonella Sps

Salmonella Kentucky isolated from human stool at MVIDH, DELHI Read More

Curiosity is the currency of science (a Nature blog article featuring Antonie van Leeuwenhoek and Robert Hooke!)

Enough doom and gloom articles about science funding and jobs! This very microbiology centered new three part series at blogs.nature.com looks back at the history of funding and argues that there is much more reason for optimism than pessimism for the future of science. Read More

TWiM #91: Rats, viruses, and bacteria

Vincent, Elio, and Michele review a study of the viruses and bacteria in commensal rats in New York City.


 


Hosts: Vincent RacanielloElio Schaechter Read More

TWiM 91 Letters



Jacob writes:
Hello hosts of TWiM and TWiV,
I'm sending this to both podcasts because I'm interested in hearing what all of you have to say (I figure that I'm going to catch Dickson on TWiV, but if not feel free to ask him on TWiP).


I saw this que... Read More

Bacteria become “genomic tape recorders”

Engineered E. coli can store long-term memories of chemical exposure, other events in their DNA.

MIT engineers have transformed the genome of the bacterium E. coli into a long-term storage device for memory. They envision that this stable, erasable, and easy-to-retrieve memory will be well su... Read More

Powdery Mildew

Sawadaea sp. (Erysiphaceae, Erysiphales) is a powdery mildew that infects Acer sp. (Maple). Infected maple leaves, usually on the adaxial surface, are covered with dense mycelia (of white to grey powder colour) with scattered chasmothecia (fruiting body, brown to dark-brown ball-like structure).... Read More

Genetic tweak gave yellow fever mosquitoes a nose for human odor

One of the world’s deadliest mosquitoes sustains its taste for human blood thanks in part to a genetic tweak that makes it more sensitive to human odor, according to new research.

Researchers report in the journal Nature that the yellow fever mosquito contains a version of an odor-detecting g... Read More

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