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Algae and Light Help Injured Mice Walk Again

An interesting article on the field of optogenetics. Using bacteria, algae and light scientists may one day invent and input/output interface for the brain and lead to cures for diseases such as Parkinsons or chronic depression. Read More

High-Speed Test To Improve Pathogen Decontamination Developed

A chemist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., has developed a technology intended to rapidly assess any presence of microbial life on spacecraft. This new method may also help the military test for disease-causing bacteria, such as a causative agent for anthrax, and may also... Read More

ARS, Company Team Up to Fight Biofilm Food Contamination

A former Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist and a private company worked to develop a new chemical formulation that could help meat processing plants keep work surfaces free of contamination.

Prior to her retirement, microbiologist Judy Arnold worked at the ARS Poultry Microbiologi... Read More

Self-Propelling Bacteria Harnessed to Turn Gears

Attach self-propelling bacteria to a cog and they'll set it spinning for you, say Italian physicists.

Last year, we looked at an idea for a bacteria-powered motor dreamt up by Luca Angelani and pals from the University of Rome in Italy. Their idea was to place a cog with asymmetric teeth into... Read More

Infectious Disease in the Age of Google - 10-22-09 at Koshland Science Museum (DC)

Tonight, at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C., Amy L. Sonricker, MPH, Project Coordinator for the HealthMap project based at the Children's Hospital of Boston, and William Warshauer, Executive Vice President, Voxiva, will present a hands-on exploration of how computers, the interne... Read More

Eating Right -- Not Supplements -- Is Best At Keeping Your Good Bacteria Healthy, Dietitian Says

Healthy eating, not supplements, is the best way to keep the good bacteria in your gut healthy, says a dietitian and researcher.

As with vitamins, it's best to get the bacteria you need from healthy food rather than taking often expensive and potentially ineffective supplements, says Gail Cre... Read More

Subterranean microbes revive tired old gas fields

Whatever you may think of our addiction to fossil fuels, there is no shortage of ideas on how to extract every last tonne. Field trials are now showing that all it takes is common fertiliser.

Natural gas is often present in coalfields, clinging to the coal. It is extracted through wells drill... Read More

Video - H1N1 Vaccine Delays Persist in US

This two-minute video is an update from Reuters on the current shortage of H1N1 vaccines. while short, the video does provide some interesting visuals of the production of H1N1 vaccine, as well as the reasons behind the delay. Read More

Is the swine flu vaccine safe?

The UK starts vaccinating people against swine flu today; in the US and Australia, vaccination has already begun. Can we be sure that safety hasn't been compromised in the race to test and produce the vaccine? Didn't vaccination hurt people during the last big swine flu scare? And do the benefit... Read More

NSF Grants $100M for Plant Genomics

Tomatoes, corn, insect resistance in poplar trees, and switchgrass durability through climate change are just some of the focus areas of the $101.6 million that the National Science Foundation has granted this week for plant genome sequencing projects.

Ranging broadly from $500,000 to $10.4 m... Read More

Byssochlamys sp.

Byssochlamys sp. Asci. Nomarski (800x) Read More

Flu Testing Fuels Revenue Growth in Roche's PCR, Purification Business This Year

Roche last week said that demand for influenza testing products drove a 24 percent spike in sales for its PCR and nucleic acid purification business in the first nine months of 2009.

Specifically, the company said that sales of its MagNA Pure nucleic acid sample-prep system and its LightCycle... Read More

Genomes Of Two Popular Research Strains Of E. Coli Sequenced

An international team of researchers from the United States, Korea, and France has sequenced and analyzed the genomes of two important laboratory strains of E. coli bacteria, one used to study evolution and the other to produce proteins for basic research or practical applications. The findings ... Read More

"Ecoligate" Leads to Water Quality Action

Every year beaches and lakes all over the country as closed down when levels of fecal coliform bacteria levels reach or exceed certain levels. Only when high E. coli levels close truly popular recreational waters is there much attention paid.

Since last spring, however, Missourians have lear... Read More

$25,000 Research Awards in Pneumococcal Vaccinology

To honor the memory of Robert Austrian for his pioneering and important research on pneumococci and pneumococcal diseases, Wyeth is sponsoring research awards for young scientists in the field of pneumococcal vaccinology.

Wyeth has selected the International Symposium of Pneumococci and Pne... Read More

New Method To Help Keep Fruit, Vegetables And Flowers Fresh

Did you know that millions of tons of fruits and vegetables in the United States end up in the trash can before being eaten, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture?

A Georgia State University professor has developed an innovative new way to keep produce and flowers fresh for longer p... Read More

Gilliam Fellow Finds a New Twist on How Some Parasites Move

In 1843, the Hungarian scientist David Gruby—considered the founder of medical microbiology—was studying a microscopic parasite in frog blood. The parasite seemed to propel itself forward like a corkscrew, so he named the creature Trypanosoma sanguinis, after the Greek word “trypanon,” or augur... Read More

Herpes simplex virus

Electron micrograph of Herpes simplex virus. Giemsa stain Read More

Cytomegalovirus

Cytomegalovirus in human foreskin tissue cells (40x) Acridine orange stain. Darl, olive green bodies in refractile cells are intranuclear inclusions. Also show paranuclear bodies which are stained darker Read More

First HIV vaccine trial success confirmed

The first HIV vaccine to be called a success has stood up to scrutiny after further analysis of the data was presented today in Paris, France. However, the new analysis also confirms that the optimistic claims, first made in September and viewed sceptically at the time, are indeed very modest.
... Read More

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