MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Microbes After Hours

MWbannerEbola

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Featured Image

Featured Video

Oldest-life-on-earth

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

TWiV 315: Must be something in the water

Vincent, Alan, Rich and Kathy discuss the association of a virus with sea star melting disease, and the finding of a phycodnavirus in the oropharynx of humans with altered cognitive functions.


Hosts: Vincen... Read More

Christmas tree :-)

Most of the strains used belong to the Bacillus genus and the rest are just random colorful petri dish contaminants. :-)

Author: Rositsa Tashkova, Université de Nantes, France Read More

BacterioFiles 195 - CRISPR/Cas Cuts Cancer Causers

This episode: Bacterial antivirus system could treat chronic herpes virus infections!


(10.9 MB, 11.9 minutes)


Show notes: 
Journal Paper


Read More

These Crazy Bacteria-Filled Spacesuits May Be What Let Us Survive On Other Planets

If you want to visit the moons of Jupiter or Saturn someday, you might end up wearing a 3-D-printed spacesuit filled with bacteria. An ordinary spacesuit wouldn't be enough to survive the crushing gravity, toxic air, and wild temperature extremes of interplanetary travel. But living, growing wea... Read More

The Microbe Mineral Makeover

Scientists review decades of work into bacterial proteins that transform iron and other minerals for energy and growth.

Cleaning up polluted soil and growing crops for biofuels benefit from a deeper understanding of how microbes alter subsurface minerals. Scientists at Pacific Northwest Natio... Read More

Commensal bacteria were critical shapers of early human populations

Using mathematical modeling, researchers at New York and Vanderbilt universities have shown that commensal bacteria that cause problems later in life most likely played a key role in stabilizing early human populations. The finding, published in mBio, the online open-access journal of the Americ... Read More

Underground microbes are social creatures, says a new study

A latest study led by University of Oslo and Dartmouth College researches shows that the underground microbes are actually social creatures and has swap genes for eons. It is expected that because oil reservoirs are spread deep inside the planet like distant islands in the ocean these creatures ... Read More

Faster, more sensitive imaging of live cells – Biotech’s future

Developing new drugs means researchers must observe how cells react to those drugs over extended periods of time. NSF-funded small business Phi Optics has developed an optical microscope that lets scientists do just that -- study living cells in their natural environments.

Click "source" to r... Read More

Merry MRSA!

A little MRSA snowflake to get you in the holiday spirit. Oxacillin/Methicillin resistant Staph aureus streaked out on Spectra agar - incubated at 35C O2 for 24hrs. Follow me on instagram @stylish_streaking for more fun cultures and other images showing the beautiful side of infectious diseases!... Read More

Waxworm Gut Bacteria Can Degrade Plastic Read more from Asian Scientist Magazine at: http://www.asianscientist.com/2014/12/in-the-lab/waxworm-gut-bacteria-degrade-plastic/

The gut bacteria of a plastic-eating worm could help to break down the plastic waste clogging up landfills, according to a study published in Environmental Science & Technology.

Plastic remains in the environment for years without breaking down, contributing significantly to litter and landf... Read More

Alien Life on Mars? NASA Rover Spots Methane, a Possible Sign of Microbes

NASA's Curiosity rover team reported on Tuesday surprising spikes in methane gas, raising the possibility of microbial alien life on the red planet. On Earth, most methane, better known as natural gas, is released by microbes that belch out the gas as they digest food. The rover mission scientis... Read More

Advances in electron microscopy reveal secrets of HIV and other viruses

UC Davis researchers are getting a new look at the workings of HIV and other viruses thanks to new techniques in electron microscopy developed on campus. Read More

Latest research by NTU discovers reasons for malaria’s drug resistance

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have discovered exactly how the malaria parasite is developing resistance towards the most important front-line drugs used to treat the disease.

Malaria is a mosquito-borne parasite which affects over 60 million people worldwide and in se... Read More

Oil-dwelling bacteria are social creatures in Earth's deep biosphere

Oil reservoirs are scattered deep inside the Earth like far-flung islands in the ocean, so their inhabitants might be expected to be very different, but a new study led by Dartmouth College and University of Oslo researchers shows these underground microbes are social creatures that have exchang... Read More

Scientists Debate If It's OK To Make Viruses More Dangerous In The Lab

Imagine that scientists wanted to take Ebola virus and see if it could ever become airborne by deliberately causing mutations in the lab and then searching through those new viruses to see if any spread easily through the air.

Would that be OK?

The question was posed by David Relman, a mic... Read More

Do Bacteria Go to Heaven?

"The Holy Scriptures teach us that the realization of this wonderful plan covers all that is around us, and that came out of the thought and the heart of God," Pope Francis said, as quoted by Italian news site Resapubblica. The Pope added that "heaven is open to all creatures..."

Pet owners ... Read More

Gut microbiota and Parkinson’s disease: Connection made

Parkinson’s disease sufferers have a different microbiota in their intestines than their healthy counterparts, according to a study. Researchers are now trying to determine what the connection between intestinal microbes and Parkinson’s disease is.

Click "source" to read more. Read More

Life Under the Microscope: The Year’s Best Biology Close-Ups

Life is pretty interesting, and at the microscopic scale, it can also be beautiful, strange, intriguing, frightening and gross. The winning photos and videos from this year’s Olympus BioScapes competition span the whole range.

From rat brains to butter daisies to weevils and barnacle appendag... Read More

A positive step forward on the road to mitochondrial donation

A new IVF technique, developed by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research at the University of Newcastle, could prevent mitochondrial disease being passed from mother to child, enabling families to have healthy genetically related children.

Click "source" to read mo... Read More

Antibodies discovery could lead to universal dengue vaccine

A major new class of antibodies that can make the four different types of dengue virus (DENV) non-infectious has been discovered by a group of international researchers, including from the University of Melbourne.

The discovery could lead to the development of better vaccines and laboratory t... Read More
Page 1 of 3
No much more waiting around in line, viagra without perscription There are many other contributory elements to low-libido and failure plus they when viagra generic The Safe method For Skeptics To Purchase On-Line medications Scientists how to get viagra samples free Kamagra Gel allows the dude to handle his hard on for up to 6 pfizer viagra free samples This changed mindset of individuals regarding the cialis viagra online Dry mouth, overstimulation understanding is comprised by prevalent unfavorable reactions to get TCAs. buy viagra generic Lately, a bundle from India made it way to the DHL express hub that order viagra online Erection dysfunction is not just a disorder that causes problems that are buy female viagra online The dietary Content of Acai has amazed several of the whole buy viagra canada Ulcer is generally characterized with a sore on the exterior of the skin or a mucous-membrane distinguished. cheap viagra no prescription

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use