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From the archives: life at 90°C

Prokaryotes are by far the most successful superkingdom in terms of both biochemical diversity and the variety of environments conquered. Bacteria can be found living in all kinds of adverse conditions; from high alkaline lakes, to below freezing temperature, to hot volcanic vents which in some ... Read More

Farmers Fight Poisonous Wheat Fungus with Cleaning and Waiting

Dave Wiechert of Nashville, Illinois, does good business most years cleaning seed for farmers in preparation for planting season. But this year, Wiechert is doing big business after harvest: cleaning fungus off wheat so farmers can sell it.

The "head scab" fungus can produce vomitoxin, a chem... Read More

My Global Video Challenge by Dr Charles J ELIKWU, Babcock University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

This is in celebration of the Global Handwashing Day, 2013. To God be Glory
Theme: The Power is Your Hand
Organized by the Infection Control Committee, Babcock University Teaching Hospital, Ilishan Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria Read More

Dairy scientist targets heat-resistant microbes

Corralling desperados with names like bacillus and paenibacillus will require ingenuity and an arsenal of weapons. These outlaws aren't rustling cattle—they're making milk sour and cheese soft and crumbly.

For more than a century, milk has been heated to kill any bacteria or pathogens that ca... Read More

Soft ray looks to save lives by developing rapid, low-cost system for detection of bacteria in blood platelets

Paul E. Johnson envisions the day when most citizens can have their blood platelets checked quickly for bacteria at a low cost. And he has created the technology that he believes can make a difference in eventually saving lives.

Johnson, a University of Wyoming professor of physics since 1981... Read More

Rare byproduct of marine bacteria kills cancer cells by snipping their DNA

Yale University researchers have determined how a scarce molecule produced by marine bacteria can kill cancer cells, paving the way for the development of new, low-dose chemotherapies.

The molecule, lomaiviticin A, was previously shown to be lethal to cultured human cancer cells, but the mech... Read More

The bug that lost a few genes to become Black Death

About 6,000 years ago, a bacterium underwent a few genetic changes. These allowed it to expand its habitat from the guts of mice to that of fleas. Such changes happen all the time, but in this particular instance the transformation eventually resulted in the Black Death that wiped out a third of... Read More

Clear halo in petri dishes by Acetobacter pasteurianus

Growth of Acetobacter pasteurianus on glucose, yeast extract, calcium carbonate, ethanol medium.
Formation of acetic acid from ethanol oxidation is shown by a clear halo around bacterial growth due to dissolution of calcium carbonate.
Organism: Acetobacter pasteurianus. Incubation conditions:... Read More

A Cheap, Promising Way to Filter Water: Through A Twig

One way to avoid getting sick while traveling is to only eat fruit that you peel yourself, since plants can filter out bacteria and prevent it from traveling throughout their tissues. Well, why not apply this principle to filtering water directly? A team of scientists have done just that, testi... Read More

Retrospective, December 2013

We continue our semi-annual ritual and post this quick tour of our featured blog posts published since June 2013.

Evolution

Microbial ‘Starstuff’. Associate blogger Gemma Reguera tells us how the remnants of a dying star become transmuted into microbial stuff, including cellular structures... Read More

Natural History is Dying, and We Are All the Losers

A few weeks ago, I came across a new paper in BioScience called “Natural History’s Place in Science and Society” that contained the following graph.

On the right axis and indicated by the line surrounded by dots is the proportion of introductory biology texts devoted to natural history since ... Read More

Research shows bacteria can combat dangerous gas leaks

Bacteria could mop up naturally-occurring and man-made leaks of natural gases before they are released into the atmosphere and cause global warming - according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Findings published today in the journal Nature shows how a single bacterial strai... Read More

Experimental Vaccine For Chikungunya Passes First Test

Scientists have taken the first steps to developing a vaccine for chikungunya — an emerging mosquito-borne virus that has infected more than a half million people in the Western Hemisphere this year. About 600 Americans have brought the virus to 43 states.

The study was small. Only 25 people ... Read More

Brewing yeasts reveal secrets of chromosomal warfare and dysfunction

Using two yeasts that have been used to brew tea and beer for centuries, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have revealed how reproductive barriers might rapidly arise to create species boundaries. Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been used to brew beer in Africa, whereas its clo... Read More

Nutrient-absorbing surface’s assembly revealed: study

Vanderbilt University researchers have now discovered how intestinal cells build this specialized structure, which is critical for absorbing nutrients and defending against pathogens. The findings, published April 10 in the journal Cell, reveal a role for adhesion molecules in brush border assem... Read More

Antibiotic resistance mechanisms of clinically important bacteria.

Antibiotic resistance mechanisms of clinically important bacteria. Read More

ICAAC 2012 - This Week in Microbiology with Vincent Racaniello


The hosts for the podcast  Read More

Insight into pathogenic fungus

The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes yeast infections, diaper rashes and oral thrush, and is the most common fungal pathogen to infect humans. Researchers have identified a protein that the fungus uses to defend itself against the human body. Another concern with the fungus is that it can... Read More

Six to Tango

One genome at a time can be exciting, but two even more so. I’m not entirely sure why this is, although it may explain our fascination with sex. And what if more than two entities were involved? What if the intimacy were not just between two individual organisms, but between a greater number of ... Read More

Making Viruses the Natural Way

Science journalist and author Carl Zimmer has a post on his blog The Loom that reflects on recent H5N1 (bird flu) research that has raised alarms in the science community over publishing results of experiments that explore dual use microorganisms (research that yields information or technologies... Read More

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