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ASM GM 2012 - Antibiotic Exposure, The Microbiome and Obesity

 


A number of variables can cause signficant changes in the human microbiome early in life including birth method and antib... Read More

The Jelly Roll of Life

We know that life on earth is incredibly diverse. It can survive deep in the trenches of the ocean and in the frozen permafrost of the arctic. Surely we have much to learn from the study of life, but we also have much to learn about the virus. Even though they are not considered living things, t... Read More

ICAAC 2012 - HIV Infection and Cardiovascular Health

Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the mid-1990s, HIV infection has evolved from a near-certain death sentence to a manageable, chronic disease. Still, ... Read More

ASM GM 2012 - The Role of Non-Food Animals in the Spread of Antibiotic Resistance


On the issue of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and animals, the first thing that comes to mind is livestock and other farm-based ani... Read More

Esther Lederberg, Pioneer of Bacterial Genetics

“She did pioneering work in genetics, but it was her husband who won a Nobel price.” So said an obituary in the British newspaper The Guardian regarding Esther Lederberg, a North American microbiologist married to Joshua Lederberg from 1946 to 1966 [8]. Being married to and working along such a... Read More

Drug-Resistant Bacteria Hang Out in Hog Workers

Careful what you sniff. Especially if you work at an industrial hog farm. Because a small study finds that drug-resistant bacteria may hang out in the noses of some workers even after four days away from work following exposure. Almost half of the tested workers continued to harbor drug-resistan... Read More

Artificial magnetic bacteria "turn" food into natural drugs

Scientists from the University of Granada have successfully created magnetic bacteria that could be added to foodstuffs and could, after ingestion, help diagnose diseases of the digestive system like stomach cancer. These important findings constitute the first use of a food as a natural drug an... Read More

A new way to diagnose malaria

Using magnetic fields, technique can detect parasite’s waste products in infected blood cells.

Over the past several decades, malaria diagnosis has changed very little. After taking a blood sample from a patient, a technician smears the blood across a glass slide, stains it with a special dye... Read More

microbes to microorganisms

Microorganisms are very diverse and include all the bacteria and archaea and almost all the protozoa. They also include some members of the fungi, algae, and animals such as rotifers. Many macro animals and plants have juvenile stages which are also microorganisms. Some microbiologists also clas... Read More

New type of heredity described in Paramecia, linked to epigenetics

Considered as an obsolete theory for many years, the transmission of acquired traits has returned to the forefront of debate thanks to the development of epigenetic research. In this context, a team of researchers has described how in Paramecia, mating types are transmitted from generation to ge... Read More

Battling superbugs

Two new technologies could enable novel strategies for combating drug-resistant bacteria.

In recent years, new strains of bacteria have emerged that resist even the most powerful antibiotics. Each year, these superbugs, including drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis and staphylococcus, infect... Read More

"Immortal" Cells from Henrietta Lacks Lead to Updated Rules on Genomic Data Sharing

Scientists who work on genomics and are funded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) must post their data online so that others can build on the information, the agency has said in an update to its guidelines.

The change, which expands the remit of an earlier data-sharing policy, is ... Read More

Killer Silk: Making Silk Fibers That Kill Anthrax and Other Microbes in Minutes

A simple, inexpensive dip-and-dry treatment can convert ordinary silk into a fabric that kills disease-causing bacteria -- even the armor-coated spores of microbes like anthrax -- in minutes, scientists are reporting in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. They describe a range of pot... Read More

Bacteria Allow Woodrats to Eat Poison

This article was first published in 2013 on the website for the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology.

Many plants do not want to be eaten. They avoid this fate by producing deadly toxins and carcinogenic poisons, such as those associated with the aptly named poison ivy, poison sumac... Read More

Supportive care may help American Ebola patients survive

Nurse Amber Vinson's discharge from the hospital Tuesday brings to seven the number of American patients who have survived Ebola, leading many people to wonder what has allowed them to beat the odds.

In West Africa, about 70% of patients die from the Ebola virus, according to the World Health... Read More

Escherichia coli on Endo agar

Beautiful metallic colonies of E. coli growing on Endo agar which is being used mostly for differentiation and isolation of Enterobacteriaceae strains.
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BacterioFiles 188 - Rat Residents Relieve Resin Roughness

This episode: Gut bacteria in Mojave desert woodrats help them detoxify and eat toxic creosote bushes!


(10 MB, 10.8 minutes)


Show notes: 
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How Did Nigeria Quash Its Ebola Outbreak So Quickly?

On July 20 a man who was ill flew on commercial planes from the heart of the Ebola epidemic in Liberia to Lagos, Nigeria's largest city. That man became Nigeria's first Ebola case—the index patient. In a matter of weeks some 19 people across two states were diagnosed with the disease (with one a... Read More

How to Employ a Microbe?

For many people microbes are associated with infections, diseases and in general mainly negative things but some microbes actually do more good than bad for us. We often take for granted that without microbes we would not have many things that we eat and use everyday and, as a matter of fact, hu... Read More

MERS virus detected in air samples from Saudi camel barn

Saudi scientists have found gene fragments of the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus in air from a barn housing an infected camel and say this suggests the disease may be transmitted through the air.

MERS, a serious respiratory illness caused by a virus known as a coronaviru... Read More

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