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Trichomonas vaginalis Parasite

An electron micrograph depicts the Trichomonas vaginalis parasite adhering to vaginal epithelial cells collected from vaginal swabs. A non-adhered parasite (right) is pear-shaped, whereas the attached parasite is flat and amoeboid.

Credit: Image courtesy of: Antonio Pereira-Neves and Marlene... Read More

TWiP 41: Flying and crawling beasts



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Dickson Despommier


Vincent and Dickson review medi... Read More

MWV Episode 63 - Forest Rohwer: Microbes of the ocean, coral reefs and the human lung

In episode 63 of MicrobeWorld Video, Dr. Stan Maloy talks with Forest Rohwer Ph.D., Professor of Biology, San Diego State University, about his research on the microbes of the ocean, coral ree... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 87 - Fermenter Fixes Folate Faults

This episode: Probiotics could help prevent folate deficiency!





Download Ep... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 71 - Bright Bacteria Brave Biting

This episode: Some ocean bacteria glow to attract those that eat them!





Dow... Read More

When Good Bugs Go Bad: Microbiome Dynamics and Disease

The human microbiome consists of thousands of viral and microbial species which inhabit the human body and have co-evolved with us to protect against pathogens, regulate organ function and supply nutrients and other factors essential for health. When these members fall out of balance, it can le... Read More

Why Science? Microbiology (video)

Explore Research at the University of Florida: Keith Schneider, an Associate Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition at the University of Florida, explains what made him want to become a scientist originally, and what he enjoys about his career and research now. Read More

Prominent Virologists Want U.S. Advisory Board to Take a Second Look at Controversial Flu Papers

A group of seventeen virologists is asking a U.S. government biosecurity advisory board to reconsider its controversial recommendation that two research teams omit key details from papers in press at Science and Nature. They note that the H5N1 fatality rate quoted widely is incorrect, and that ... Read More

Legal opinion: H5N1 research and the limits of government regulation of science

John D. Kraemer, JD, MPH, assistant professor of health systems administration at Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies, and Lawrence O. Gostin, the Linda D. and Timothy J. O’Neill Professor of Global Health Law and faculty director of the O'Neill Institute for National and Gl... Read More

MRSA Staph Strain Developed Drug Resistance in Your Burger: Research demonstrates the need to use antibiotics sparingly in food production, researchers say

A bacteria strain that causes a hard-to-treat staph infection probably developed its antibiotic resistance in food animals, a team of scientists announced Tuesday.

The strain of staph, known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA CC398, most often infects farm workers who com... Read More

TWiM 34 Letters

Peter writes:

Dear TWiM Team


I see that some action is now being taken in America against the non-therapeutic use of antibiotics as livestock growth promoters:


Read More

New influenza A virus found in bats

Influenza A virus reservoirs in animals have provided novel genetic elements leading to the emergence of global pandemics in humans. Most influenza A viruses circulate in waterfowl, but those that infect mammalian hosts are thought to pose the greatest risk for zoonotic spread to humans and the ... Read More

Zombie Bacteria - Lag Phase In Salmonella

Bacteria can multiply rapidly, potentially doubling every 20 minutes in ideal conditions but this exponential growth phase is preceded by a period known as lag phase, where no increase in cell number is seen. Lag phase was first described in the 19th Century, and was assumed to be needed by bact... Read More

TWiV 162: Transcription



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit... Read More

Microbiology: Learning about who we are

Microbial inhabitants outnumber our body's own cells by about ten to one. These residents have become the subject of intensive research, which is beginning to elucidate their roles in health and disease.

Two journal articles by, David A. Relman, Departments of Medicine and of Microbiology and... Read More

Moffitt Cancer Center Researchers Discover How Cancer Cells “Hijack” a Mechanism to Grow

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and colleagues at the University of South Florida have discovered a mechanism that explains how some cancer cells “hijack” a biological process to potentially activate cell growth and the survival of cancer gene expression.

Their study appeared in a recen... Read More

House Of Natural Fiber's Intelligent Bacteria At The New Museum

As part of The Ungovernables' exhibition, The New Museum hosted The House of Natural Fiber (HONF), a new media art collective out of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Yogyakarta is the second largest city on Java, a densely-populated island that hosts an active volcano named Mt. Merapi which erupted in 200... Read More

Killer whales facing an airborne threat

New research shows that killer whales are inhaling bacteria, fungi and viruses once believed to be found only on land. Some of the pathogens are highly virulent. And some are even antibiotic-resistant.

The scientists followed the killer whales by boat, trying to catch the precise moment the a... Read More

Researchers Create Living ‘Neon Signs’ Composed of Millions of Glowing Bacteria

In an example of life imitating art, biologists and bioengineers at UC San Diego have created a living neon sign composed of millions of bacterial cells that periodically fluoresce in unison like blinking light bulbs.

Their achievement, detailed in this week’s advance online issue of the jour... Read More

A viral mashup in snakes

If you know anything about snakes you might be familiar with snake inclusion body disease, or IBD. This transmissible and fatal disease affects snakes of a variety of species but has been best studied in boas. The name comes from the presence of large masses (inclusions) in the cytoplasm of cell... Read More
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