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TWiM 35: Ohne hauch



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Read More

Diane Harper: HPV Vaccine Efficacy (MWV52)

In episode 52 of MicrobeWorld Video, filmed at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Meeting in Washington, D.C., on February 18, 2011, Dr. Stan Maloy talks with Diane Harper, M.D., M.P.H, Profess... Read More

Bacteria in the gut of autistic children different from non-autistic children

The underlying reason autism is often associated with gastrointestinal problems is an unknown, but new results to be published in the online journal mBio® on January 10 reveal that the guts of autistic children differ from other children in at least one important way: many children with autism h... Read More

TWiV 161: Concerto in B



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit... Read More

Microscale level of a community of diatoms, unicellular algae

Winner from the 2008 Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge presented in the Sept. 26, 2008 issue of Science.

The winning photography entry, "Glass Forest," depicts at the microscale level a community of diatoms, unicellular algae characterized by a peculiar glass-like cell wall, att... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 89 - Counting Cloud Communities

This episode: Sampling storm cloud microbial communities with hailstones!





... Read More

Snottites - slimy, dripping stalactites made of goo, that contain bacteria in abundance and beautiful microscopic gypsum crystal formations.

Snottites have captivated cave-goers and scientists alike since the earliest publication on cave microbes by Hoeg in 1946. These biofilms cover the walls with a thick snot-like film, from which they derive their particularly appropriate name. A variety of cave systems, the Frasassi caves in Ital... Read More

Mitochondria share an ancestor with SAR11, a globally significant marine microbe

A recent study by researchers at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, and the Oregon State University provides strong evidence that mitochondria share a common evolutionary ancestor with a lineage of marine bacteria known as SAR11, arguably the most abundant group of microorganisms on Earth.

Bill... Read More

Engineered Gut Bacteria Reverse Type 1 Diabetes in Experimental Mice

Scientists have managed to reverse type 1 diabetes (T1D) in experimental mice by giving the animals an oral course of harmless gut bacteria that had been engineered to secrete the whole proinsulin autoantigen (PINS) and the immunomodulatory human cytokine IL-10 (hIL10). An international team led... Read More

TWiM 29 Letters

Charlotte writes:

At the beginning of Twim #28 Michael articulated his love for math and around minute 12 his desire for "ground truthing" the number of times one touches their face. In response I o... Read More

Legal opinion: H5N1 research and the limits of government regulation of science

John D. Kraemer, JD, MPH, assistant professor of health systems administration at Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies, and Lawrence O. Gostin, the Linda D. and Timothy J. O’Neill Professor of Global Health Law and faculty director of the O'Neill Institute for National and Gl... Read More

48% of Retail Chicken Contaminated with E. Coli

A recent test of packaged raw chicken products bought at grocery stores across the country found that roughly half of them were contaminated with the bacteria E. coli.

E. coli, which the study said was an indicator of fecal contamination, was found in 48 percent of 120 chicken products bought... Read More

Study Debunks Common Myth That Urine Is Sterile

Researchers have determined that bacteria are present in the bladders of some healthy women, which discredits the common belief that normal urine is sterile. These findings were published in the April issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology by researchers at Loyola University Chicago Strit... Read More

Dr. Kiki's Science Hour Guest Vincent Racaniello

Professor Vincent Racaniello will be a guest today, Thursday 28 July, on Dr. Kiki's Science Hour. Tune in to live.twit.tv at 7:00 PM EDT and listen to Dr. Kirsten Sanford discuss viruses with the host of 'This Week in Virology', 'This Week in Parasitism', and 'This Week in Microbiology'. Read More

MRSA Staph Strain Developed Drug Resistance in Your Burger: Research demonstrates the need to use antibiotics sparingly in food production, researchers say

A bacteria strain that causes a hard-to-treat staph infection probably developed its antibiotic resistance in food animals, a team of scientists announced Tuesday.

The strain of staph, known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA CC398, most often infects farm workers who com... Read More

BacterioFiles Micro Edition 60 - Making Mysterious Microbial Missives

This episode: Sending secret messages with glowing bacteria!




Downloa... Read More

Prosthogonimus macrorchis

Prosthogonimus macrorchis, a flatworm poultry parasite.

A digenetic trematode (family Prosthogonimidae) located in the oviduct and bursa fabricii of poultry in North America, particularly common in states bordering the Great Lakes. (http://www.medilexicon.com) Credit: Mr. Spike Walker

2010... Read More

Zombie Bacteria - Lag Phase In Salmonella

Bacteria can multiply rapidly, potentially doubling every 20 minutes in ideal conditions but this exponential growth phase is preceded by a period known as lag phase, where no increase in cell number is seen. Lag phase was first described in the 19th Century, and was assumed to be needed by bact... Read More

Human gut bacteria seem to be picky eaters

People who eat a diet high in fats and animal protein tend to have a different group of bacteria flourishing in their gut compared with those who eat a mostly plant-based diet, researchers have found.

Researchers suspect that the microbes within us affect our vulnerability to infectious disea... Read More

Microbiology: Learning about who we are

Microbial inhabitants outnumber our body's own cells by about ten to one. These residents have become the subject of intensive research, which is beginning to elucidate their roles in health and disease.

Two journal articles by, David A. Relman, Departments of Medicine and of Microbiology and... Read More
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