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MdlM 111: Microbiologia en lugares exoticos con Erin Symonds

El tratamiento de aguas residuales en comunidades pequeñas y virus como indicadores de riesgo a la salud pública: estos son dos de los temas a discutirse en la entrevista de hoy con Erin Symonds, una estudiante doctoral de la Universidad de Sur de la Florida.


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You’re Probably Not Mostly Microbes

We are, supposedly, outnumbered in our own bodies. We play host to an extraordinary menagerie of bacteria and other microbes—the microbiome—and it’s frequently said that these teeming cells outnumber our own by ten to one. This 10:1 ratio crops up everywhere. It appears in scientific papers, blo... Read More

Hey Yogurt-Maker, Where'd You Get Those Microbes?

This week is Yogurt Week on NPR it seems with a collection of stories about the microbes involved in yogurt manufacturing.

"Yogurt is a truly living food. The bacteria that transform milk into this thick and sour food also provide a sense of mystique.

For Atanas Valev, they carry the tas... Read More

Stopping malaria in its tracks

A new drug acts as a roadblock for malaria, curing mice of established infection, according to a study in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. Treatment was not associated with obvious side effects, suggesting that the drug may also be safe and effective in humans. Read More

The Wall of Polio, version 3.0

Back in 2013 I built a Wall of Polio in my laboratory – a large stack of six-well cell culture plates that have been used to measure the concentration of polioviruses in various samples by plaque assay. It became a focal point of the lab at which many guests came to have their photographs taken.... Read More

Bacterial Enzyme is Found for a Medical Way of Smoking Cessation

BOC Sciences-There is a new species of bacteria found by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) for a kind of enzyme it produces that can be used as an interfering substance to achieve smoking cessation. This finding will be smokingof considerable significance for its effectivenes... Read More

Expression of a single gene lets scientists easily grow hepatitis C virus in the lab

Worldwide, 185 million people have chronic hepatitis C. Since the late 1980s, when scientists discovered the virus that causes the infection, they have struggled to find ways to grow it in human cells in the lab -- an essential part of learning how the virus works and developing new effective tr... Read More

Romidepsin can reverse HIV latency in patients on long-term ART

A cure for HIV requires the eradication of latent (i.e., dormant and therefore hidden) virus from reservoirs in immune cells throughout the body. HIV latency depends on the activity of proteins from the human host called histone deacetylases (HDAC), and previous work has shown that HDAC inhibito... Read More

HIV particles do not cause AIDS, our own immune cells do

Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes have revealed that HIV does not cause AIDS by the virus's direct effect on the host's immune cells, but rather through the cells' lethal influence on one another. Read More

Why do we still use Sabin poliovirus vaccine?

The Sabin infectious, attenuated poliovirus vaccines are known to cause vaccine-associated paralysis in a small number of recipients. In contrast, the Salk inactivated vaccine does not cause poliomyelitis. Why are the Sabin vaccines still used globally? The answer to this question requires a bri... Read More

Virus-like particle vaccine protects mice from many flu strains

A vaccine that protects against a wide variety of influenza viruses (a so-called universal flu vaccine) is a critical public health goal given the significant rates of illness and death caused by seasonal influenza and the potentially devastating effects of a pandemic influenza strain. Now, rese... Read More

TWiM 122 Letters

Hunter writes:


Greetings TWiM crew!
 
I recently learned of a new game (currently getting ready for Alpha and crowd funding) where players will edit microbes at the genetic level and pit them against microbes created by other players. The game is called... Read More

Study adds to evidence that viruses are alive

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A new analysis supports the hypothesis that viruses are living entities that share a long evolutionary history with cells, researchers report. The study offers the first reliable method for tracing viral evolution back to a time when neither viruses nor cells existed in the fo... Read More

BacterioFiles 245 - Plant Prokaryotes Produce Protective Plaques

This episode: Bacteria around rice roots help protect plants from arsenic toxicity!


(10.1 MB, 11 minutes)


Show notes: 
News item/ Read More

Single dose Ebola vaccine is safe and effective in monkeys against outbreak strain

National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists report that a single dose of an experimental Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine completely protects cynomolgus macaques against the current EBOV outbreak strain, EBOV-Makona, when given at least seven days before exposure, and partially protects them if giv... Read More

TSRI & Janssen study makes major advance toward more effective, long-lasting flu vaccine

LA JOLLA, CA - August 24, 2015 - Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes--work that could one day eliminate the need for repeate... Read More

TWiP 90 letters

 


Christine writes:


Dear Vincent, Dickson and Daniel,


I think the latest case describes cutaneous furuncular myiasis.


The lesion on the young man's buttock is suggestive of a botfly infection with the larvae most likely of the species Derm... Read More

Cystic Fibrosis Microorganisms Survive on Little to No Oxygen

Washington, DC – July 28, 2015 – Microbes contributing to cystic fibrosis (CF) are able to survive in saliva and mucus that is chemically heterogeneous, including significant portions that are largely devoid of oxygen, according to a study published this week in mBio®, the online open-access jou... Read More

Scripps research-designed drug candidate significantly reduces HIV reactivation rate

HIV-infected patients remain on antiretroviral therapy for life because the virus survives over the long-term in infected dormant cells. Interruption of current types of antiretroviral therapy results in a rebound of the virus and clinical progression to AIDS. Read More

Why West Nile virus is more dangerous in the elderly

West Nile virus (WNV) is particularly dangerous in older people, who account for a large number of severe cases and deaths caused by the virus. WNV infection turns serious when the virus crosses the blood-brain-barrier and wreaks havoc among nerve cells in the brain. A study published on July 23... Read More

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