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Trichuris trichiura -egg at 400*

My name is Ankit Belabse
This photo was taken at Goldengate Int'l college kathmandu, Nepal by our team(milan upreti,Asia Poudel, Krishus Nepal, Rikesh Baidhya and Bibhusan Neupane ) during the project work . Read More

Synthetic Fabrics Host More Stench-Producing Bacteria (podcast)

Micrococcus bacteria thrive on the open-air lattice of synthetic fibers--where they sit chomping on the fatty acids in our sweat, turning them into shorter, stinkier molecules. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Click "source" to listen to podcast. Read More

Termites evolved complex bioreactors 30 million years ago

Achieving complete breakdown of plant biomass for energy conversion in industrialized bioreactors remains a complex challenge, but new research shows that termite fungus farmers solved this problem more than 30 million years ago. The new insight reveals that the great success of termite farmers ... Read More

Catching Up, Part I: Meeting with Former Research Students at ASM in Boston in May.

In this post, I meet up with six of my former undergraduate students at the General Meeting of the American Society of Microbiology in Boston last May. We had a great dinner where we could catch up on challenges and cheer each other on. I am very proud of the great students in this post, who a... Read More

Avian influenza virus isolated in harbor seals poses a threat to humans

A study led by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists found the avian influenza A H3N8 virus that killed harbor seals along the New England coast can spread through respiratory droplets and poses a threat to humans. The research appears in the current issue of the scientific journal Na... Read More

New Tracking Technologies Aim to Prevent Sloppy Handling at U.S. Biolabs

Two months after safety breaches at federal labs first set off a public furor, top health officials are auditioning new checks on worker safety including specialized time-lapse cameras and digital worksheets to track crucial steps such as bacterium inactivation. The goal: to prevent future debac... Read More

Research predicts possible 6,800 new Ebola cases this month

New research published in the online journal PLoS Outbreaks predicts new Ebola cases could reach 6,800 in West Africa by the end of the month if new control measures are not enacted.

Arizona State University and Harvard University researchers also discovered through modelling analysis that th... Read More

bacteria

what is it Read More

Researchers develop new DNA sequencing method to diagnose tuberculosis

Researchers working in the UK and The Gambia, have developed a new approach to the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) that relies on direct sequencing of DNA extracted from sputum (a technique called metagenomics) to detect and characterize the bacteria that cause TB without the need for time-consum... Read More

colony picture of dermatophyte

by: cls. sundar khadka,
PG in clinical microbiology,
institute of medicine(IOM), TU teaching hospital , kathmandu, nepal. Read More

How NASA's Microbe Detection Technology Speed Up Tissue Transplants

What do the Curiosity rover and a bone allograft have in common? They both have got to be super duper clean.

That’s why AlloSource, a Colorado-based nonprofit that specializes in human tissue donation, has signed a Space Act Agreement with NASA and its Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), to make... Read More

One Dose of Flu Drug Shortens Fever

A single dose of an investigational influenza drug was able to reduce the duration of fever and viral shedding, researchers said here.

In a combined analysis of two randomized placebo-controlled trials, the neuraminidase inhibitor peramivir (Rapivab), given by injection within 48 hours of sym... Read More

Knowing how bacteria take out trash could lead to new antibiotics

A team of scientists has reconstructed how bacteria tightly control their growth and division, the cell cycle, by destroying specific proteins through regulated protein degradation. All organisms use controlled protein degradation to alter cell behavior in response to changing environment. A pro... Read More

apple of my eye

I love to share my work,the simplicity in Happiness.I am sharing it here because i know my fellow microbiologist also admire this visual treats in their labs. http://adeebblog.blogspot.in/ Read More

Researchers Unlock the Genetic Code of Cancer-Causing Liver Fluke Parasite

An international team of scientists from Singapore, Thailand, China and Australia has cracked the genetic code of the liver fluke parasite, Opisthorchis viverrini, using a unique DNA analysis technique developed at A*STAR’s Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS).

GIS’s DNA analysis technique ha... Read More

Transmission of Ebola virus

As the West African epidemic of Ebola virus grows, so does misinformation about the virus, particularly how it is transmitted from person to person. Ebola virus is transmitted from human to human by close contact with infected patients and virus-containing body fluids. It does not spread among h... Read More

Trials of novel Ebola drugs to be fast-tracked in West Africa

Potential new treatments for Ebola are to be tested in West Africa for the first time as part of an international initiative to fast-track trials of the most promising drugs against the disease that has already led to over 2,600 deaths.

Click "source" to read more. Read More

Sandia researchers find clues to superbug evolution

Imagine going to the hospital with one disease and coming home with something much worse, or not coming home at all.

With the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistance pathogens, healthcare-associated infections have become a serious threat. On any given day about one in 25 hospital patie... Read More

Engineered proteins stick like glue — even in water

New adhesives based on mussel proteins could be useful for naval or medical applications.

Shellfish such as mussels and barnacles secrete very sticky proteins that help them cling to rocks or ship hulls, even underwater. Inspired by these natural adhesives, a team of MIT engineers has designe... Read More

My First Radio Interview About Teaching, Research, and Microbial Supremacy...

The great folks at "The People Behind the Science" interviewed me over Skype in late July, and the interview has just been released as a podcast. I discuss my path through science, my thoughts on teaching, research at undergraduate institution, and how to motivate and inspire students to strive... Read More

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