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Rats and Their Alarming Bugs

If the past few years have taught us anything, it’s that our well-being is intimately linked to the health of animals.

The current Ebola epidemic probably got its start when someone came into contact with an infected animal, perhaps a monkey or a fruit bat. The virus causing Middle East respi... Read More

Research Institutions Will Have To Identify 'Dual-Use' Pathogens

Any research institution that receives federal funding will soon have to screen certain kinds of scientific experiments to see if the work could potentially be misused to endanger the public.

The new policy will take effect next year, and it's the latest effort by the U. S. government to come... Read More

Bio-art: The Marriage of Art and Microorganisms

A short interview with artist Selin Balci on her use of microbes as an artistic medium. Here's a quote from the piece on SkyLife.com...

"Bio-art has not yet been defined in a way that is accepted by artists. Some artists, for example, make DNA models and call that BioArt. To me, BioArt has to... Read More

Sandia researchers find clues to superbug evolution

Imagine going to the hospital with one disease and coming home with something much worse, or not coming home at all.

With the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistance pathogens, healthcare-associated infections have become a serious threat. On any given day about one in 25 hospital patie... Read More

Trials of novel Ebola drugs to be fast-tracked in West Africa

Potential new treatments for Ebola are to be tested in West Africa for the first time as part of an international initiative to fast-track trials of the most promising drugs against the disease that has already led to over 2,600 deaths.

Click "source" to read more. Read More

Viral Infection Might Just Be a Phase...Transition

Many double-stranded DNA viruses infect cells by ejecting their genetic information into a host cell. But how does the usually rigid DNA packaged inside a virus' shell flow from the virus to the cell?

In two separate studies, Carnegie Mellon University biophysicist Alex Evilevitch has shown t... Read More

Temperature

(A) Staphlococcus aureus, (B) Bacillus stearothermophilus, (C) Pseudomonas fluorescens and (D) Escherichia coli were grown on TSA for 24 hrs at varying incubator temperatures (4, 25, 40, and 60 degree’s C). Note: The 4 degree plate were incubated for a week to get good Pseudomonas fluorescens ... Read More

Primitive microbes stole bacterial genes on a surprising scale

A University of Otago researcher is part of an international team that has discovered that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) played a surprisingly large role in the evolution of primitive microbes known as archaea.

HGT, which involves acquiring genetic material from another unrelated organism in... Read More

Gut Microbes and Jet Lag, Shift-Work Weight Gain

Disruptions in the human circadian clock can throw off microbes in the gut, potentially boosting the risk of obesity, a new study suggests.

The results may help explain why shift workers and people who get jet lag by traveling frequently often pack on extra pounds.

"These surprising findin... Read More

Pneumonia bacterium leaves tiny lesions in the heart

The long-observed association between pneumonia and heart failure now has more physical evidence, thanks to research in the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

The researchers found proof that Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of comm... Read More

'Deadly diarrhea' rates nearly doubled in 10 years: Study

Infections with the intestinal superbug C. difficile nearly doubled from 2001 to 2010 in US hospitals without noticeable improvement in patient mortality rates or hospital lengths of stay, according to a study of 2.2 million C. difficile infection cases.

Click "source" to read more. Read More

world of fungi

Mycelium grown in nutrient agar observed under at 40x 100x Read More

Yeast Coaxed To Make Morphine

Genetically manipulated yeast can produce morphine, which could help get around the problems with poppy crops, which include climate, disease and war. Karen Hopkin reports.

Yeast. They already participate in producing some of the most popular pain-killing substances around: beer and wine. Now... Read More

New evidence of ancient multicellular life sets evolutionary timeline back 60 million years

A Virginia Tech geobiologist with collaborators from the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found evidence in the fossil record that complex multicellularity appeared in living things about 600 million years ago – nearly 60 million years before skeletal animals appeared during a huge growth spurt ... Read More

Osmotic pressure

(A) Bacillus subtilis, (B) Staphlococcus aureus and (C) Escherichia coli were grown on BHI media with varying concentrations of NaCl (0.85%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 20%) at 37 degrees C for 24 hrs. Read More

BacterioFiles 187 - Bacteria Bolster Bedbug Biotin

This episode: Some Wolbachia bacteria produce vitamin B7 for their insect hosts!


(7.1 MB, 7.75 minutes)


Show notes: 
Journal Paper


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In Hopes Of Fixing Faulty Genes, One Scientist Starts With The Basics

Whether they admit it or not, many (if not most) scientists secretly hope to get a call in October informing them they've won a Nobel Prize.

But I've talked to a lot of Nobel laureates, and they are unanimous on one point: None of them pursued a research topic with the intention of winning th... Read More

Osmotic pressure

A) Bacillus subtilis, (B) Staphlococcus aureus and (C) Escherichia coli were grown on BHI media with varying concentrations of NaCl (0.85%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 20%) at 37 degrees C for 24 hrs. Read More

Central Park Features Worldwide Soil Microbes

"If you want to find unique diversity and if you want to find a wide range of different below-ground organisms, you don't have to travel around the world. You can walk across Central Park."

That statement comes from Noah Fierer, an ecology and evolutionary biology professor at the University ... Read More

The Epstein–Barr Virus Wears Chain Mail

The Epstein–Barr virus and its relatives in the herpesvirus family are known for their longevity. They persist in host tissues for years, causing diseases like mononucleosis, Kaposi's sarcoma and herpes, and are notoriously difficult to kill. University of California, Los Angeles, biophysicist Z... Read More
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