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Bio-art: The Marriage of Art and Microorganisms

A short interview with artist Selin Balci on her use of microbes as an artistic medium. Here's a quote from the piece on SkyLife.com...

"Bio-art has not yet been defined in a way that is accepted by artists. Some artists, for example, make DNA models and call that BioArt. To me, BioArt has to... Read More

Liquid DNA behind virus attacks

Viruses can convert their DNA from solid to fluid form, which explains how viruses manage to eject DNA into the cells of their victims. This has been shown in two new studies carried out by Lund University in Sweden.

Both research studies are about the same discovery made for two different vi... Read More

Primitive microbes stole bacterial genes on a surprising scale

A University of Otago researcher is part of an international team that has discovered that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) played a surprisingly large role in the evolution of primitive microbes known as archaea.

HGT, which involves acquiring genetic material from another unrelated organism in... Read More

Where Does Ebola Hide?

The people of Guinea have been locked in a life-and-death struggle with Ebola virus since last December. Nearly 60 percent of Guineans infected with the virus since then have died. To cope with the unprecedented disease, the government went so far as to ban soup made from bats.

Why bats? Bec... Read More

Antibiotics may help Salmonella spread in infected animals, scientists learn

Some people infected with pathogens spread their germs to others while remaining symptom-free themselves. Now, investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine believe they may know why.

When the scientists gave oral antibiotics to mice infected with Salmonella typhimurium, a bacte... Read More

TWiM #90: Think globally, act locally

Hosts: Vincent Racaniello.


Special guests: Laurene Mascola and Read More

Cells' powerhouses were once energy parasites: Study upends current theories of how mitochondria began

Parasitic bacteria were the first cousins of the mitochondria that power cells in animals and plants -- and first acted as energy parasites in those cells before becoming beneficial, according to a new study.

Click "source" to read more. Read More

Could Multiple Sclerosis Begin in the Gut?

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an electrical disorder, or rather one of impaired myelin, a fatty, insulating substance that better allows electric current to bolt down our neurons and release the neurotransmitters that help run our bodies and brains. Researchers have speculated for some time that th... Read More

Studies Examine Vaccination Strategies For Prevention, Control of Avian Flu - press release

Two randomized trials in the October 8 issue of JAMA examine new vaccination strategies for the prevention and control of avian influenza, often referred to as “bird flu.” This is a theme issue on infectious disease.

In one study, Mark J. Mulligan, M.D., of the Emory University School of Medi... Read More

'Breath test' shows promise for diagnosing fungal pneumonia

Many different microbes can cause pneumonia, and treatment may be delayed or off target if doctors cannot tell which bug is the culprit. A novel approach—analyzing a patient's breath for key chemical compounds made by the infecting microbe—may help detect invasive aspergillosis, a fungal infecti... Read More

Flu viruses disguised as waste

Viruses cannot multiply without cellular machinery. Although extensive research into how pathogens invade cells has been conducted for a number of viruses, we do not fully understand how the shell of a virus is cracked open during the onset of infection thus releasing the viral genome. An ETH Zu... Read More

Rats and Their Alarming Bugs

If the past few years have taught us anything, it’s that our well-being is intimately linked to the health of animals.

The current Ebola epidemic probably got its start when someone came into contact with an infected animal, perhaps a monkey or a fruit bat. The virus causing Middle East respi... Read More

Spain Confirms First Ebola Transmission Outside of Africa

Health authorities in Spain have confirmed that a health worker at the Carlos III Hospital in Madrid, Spain has been infected with the Ebola virus. This is the first time anyone has contracted the virus outside of Africa.

The woman, a nurse technician, had worked in the room where two Ebola p... Read More

‘Programmable’ antibiotic harnesses an enzyme to attack drug-resistant microbes

The multitude of microbes scientists have found populating the human body have good, bad and mostly mysterious implications for our health. But when something goes wrong, we defend ourselves with the undiscriminating brute force of traditional antibiotics, which wipe out everything at once, rega... Read More

Shaking up cell biology: Researchers focus in on decades-old mitochondrial mystery

Elvis did it, Michael Jackson did it, and so do the mitochondria in our cells. They shake. While Elvis and Michael shook for decades before loud and appreciative audiences, mitochondrial oscillations have quietly bewildered scientists for more than 40 years.

Now, a team of scientists at Natio... Read More

Special bacteria, 13000 cleaners to clean Dhaka

Dhaka City Corporation will engage around 13,000 cleaning staffs and special bacteria to keep the capital clean during Eid-ul-Azha festival.

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This large number of cleaning staff will work round the clock for 48 hours. Apart from that, t... Read More

New vaccines targeting adults, teens are best chance to eliminate TB by 2050

Targets to eliminate tuberculosis by 2050 are more likely to be met if new vaccines are developed for adults and adolescents instead of for infants, according to new research.

Researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the Stop TB Department at the World Health Organi... Read More

Klebsiella pneumoniae Bacteria

A human neutrophil interacting with Klebsiella pneumoniae (pink), a multidrug–resistant bacterium that causes severe hospital infections.

Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Read More

Middle-Aged Adults Were More Susceptible to the Flu Last Year because of a New Viral Mutation

A team of scientists, led by researchers at The Wistar Institute, has identified a possible explanation for why middle-aged adults were hit especially hard by the H1N1 influenza virus during the 2013-2014 influenza season. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sci... Read More

Discovery on how fungi avoid immune responses of plants leads to new generation of fungicides

Plants that come under attack from pathogens have an automatic immune response. Fungi get around this plant immunity by injecting proteins into the host plant cells. These 'effector proteins' enable the fungi to escape the plant's immune system and allow the fungal cells to enter the plant unrec... Read More
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