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In-feed antibiotic effects on the microbiome of swine

Antibiotics have been administered to agricultural animals for disease treatment, disease prevention, and growth promotion for over 50 years. The impact of such antibiotic use on the treatment of human diseases is hotly debated. This study examined differences in pigs receiving antibiotics and t... Read More

Hearty bacteria help make case for life in the extreme

The bottom of a glacier is not the most hospitable place on Earth, but at least two types of bacteria happily live there, according to researchers.

The bacteria -- Chryseobacterium and Paenisporosarcina -- showed signs of respiration in ice made in the laboratory that was designed to simulate... Read More

Manganese May Have Potential in Neutralizing Deadly Shiga Toxin

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have discovered that an element commonly found in nature might provide a way to neutralize the potentially lethal effects of a compound known as Shiga toxin. New results published in the Jan. 20 issue of Science by Carnegie Mellon biologists Adam Linstedt a... Read More

Bacterial toxin may play important role in acute, chronic urinary tract infections

Researchers from the University of Utah have identified a process by which the most common types of urinary tract infection-causing bacteria are able to trigger bladder cell shedding and disable immune responses. According to this new study, published in the Jan. 19, 2012, issue of Cell Host & M... Read More

Many high-risk Americans don't get hepatitis B vaccine (press release)

Although there is an effective vaccine for hepatitis B and public health officials have a strong sense of who is at highest risk for the infectious liver disease, tens of thousands of people in the United States contract the virus every year. According to a new study by researchers at Brown Univ... Read More

Balancing Scientific Freedom and National Security

The U.S. government’s request that the journals Science and Nature withhold scientific information related to the genetically modified H5N1 virus because of biosecurity concerns does not violate the First Amendment, say two Georgetown University professors. They caution, however, that a fair, tr... Read More

Microbial Academy of Sciences Turns Cyanobacteria Into Cosmonauts

The universe might be both too large and too small to fully comprehend. But perhaps Earth’s first celestial observatory for single-cell organisms can provide alternative perspectives on cosmology and art.

That’s the thought process of concept philosopher and Wired columnist Jonathon Keats, wh... Read More

In Bat Deaths, a Catastrophe in the Making?

A “biodiversity crisis”: that’s how some conservationists describe new numbers released this week by the federal Fish and Wildlife Service on so-called white-nose syndrome. According to the agency, 5.7 million to 6.7 million bats have died from the fungal ailment in eastern North America since a... Read More

Precocious Walker (Video)

Here's a great video published by Science News which shows a newborn bacterial cell stand up, walk away from its sister cell, and then detache from the surface. Credit: Courtesy of Gerard Wong, University of California, Los Angeles, Bioengineering, California NanoSystems Institute.

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El Podcast del Microbio Nº 245 and 246. La levadura de la cerveza lager: una fusión en frío (Lager beer yeast: a cold fusion)



























El podcast del microbio Nº 245 y 246 summarize the paper by Libkind et al in PNAS about the possible origin of Saccharomyces pas... Read More

Serratia marcescens colonies

Pigmented and non-pigmented parts of Serratia marcescens colonies. Taken from the Wistreich Collection, appearing exclusively on MicrobeWorld. Read More

Polar growth at the bacterial scale reveals potential new targets for antibiotic therapy

An international team of microbiologists led by Indiana University researchers has identified a new bacterial growth process -- one that occurs at a single end or pole of the cell instead of uniform, dispersed growth along the long axis of the cell -- that could have implications in the developm... Read More

Ulcer-Causing Bacteria Baffled by Mucus

A new study by engineering researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute demonstrates how introducing certain polymers—like those found in human mucus and saliva—into the environment makes it significantly more difficult for H. pylori and other microorganisms to coordinate.

“In the human bo... Read More

Bacteria Pictures By Fernan Federici

Fernan Federici, a researcher in the Haseloff Lab at Cambridge University and one of the Synthetic Aesthetics residents, studies how cells grow and develop into complex shapes and structures. Using confocal microscopy, he tracks the growth of plant cells and tissues, creating models of how cell ... Read More

Vaccine Against Bacterial Meningitis Shows Promise

A new vaccine to protect against meningococcus B, a common cause of bacterial meningitis, shows promise in clinical trials, researchers in Chile report.

Vaccines that protect from four other strains of Neisseria meningitides, a bacteria that causes meningococcal disease, are already in use or... Read More

Fungus has killed 6 million bats, U.S. says

The death toll from white-nose syndrome is now 5.7 million to 6.7 million bats since 2006, and the disease is still spreading quickly, U.S. officials report.

It's been six years since the dawn of white-nose syndrome — a bat-killing fungus that's sweeping west across North America — but the di... Read More

New Analysis Challenges Tamiflu Efficacy

A new review of the influenza drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu) has raised questions about both the efficacy of the medication and the commitment of its maker to supply enough data for claims about the drug to be evaluated by independent experts.

It also raises questions about the entire process of ... Read More

Small fragments of viral nucleic acid cross borders in monkey meat

The finding of viral nucleic acid sequences in illegally imported wildlife products has attracted the attention of the New York Times, which published an article entitled From the jungle to J.F.K., viruses cross borders in monkey meat. Read More

Totally Drug-Resistant TB: A Patient Is Missing

There was a lot of interest in in TDR-TB Friday; both the Leonard Lopate Show on WNYC and Science Friday kindly asked me to be on to talk about it.

While I was waiting for the phone link to Science Friday to become live, an alarming bulletin arrived in my email. The early-warning list ProME... Read More

FDA bans some – but not all – farmyard antibiotics

PREVENTION is not always better than cure. The US Food and Drug Administration has finally moved to restrict the farmyard use of antibiotics to prevent livestock illness over concerns that they may generate antibiotic-resistant superbugs. But the announcement covers such a small subset of drugs ... Read More

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