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Urinary tract infection: How bacteria nestle in

Almost every second woman suffers from a bladder infection at some point in her life. Also men are affected by cystitis, though less frequently. In eighty percent of the cases, it is caused by the intestinal bacterium E. coli. It travels along the urethra to the bladder where it triggers painful... Read More

Bid to beat baby chest infection boosted by immune study

Babies at risk of a serious lung infection could be helped by a therapy based on the body's natural immune defences. Read More

TWiM #123: A microbial MAGE

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloMichael Schmidt, and Elio Schaechter


Spe... Read More

Congenital Zika Syndrome

Data from several clinical studies in Brazil establish a strong link between infection of pregnant women with Zika virus and a variety of birth defects collectively called congenital Zika syndrome.

In the latest study conducted in Rio de Janeiro, the authors enrolled 88 pregnant women who had... Read More

Clostridium difficile in the domicile

Patients undergoing FMT have often suffered for years prior to the therapy. If their homes have been contaminated with the eradicated microbe, could patients suffer a relapse by way of reinoculation? This was the question asked by a group of physician scientists, whose findings were recently pub... Read More

More than 2 million people co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C

An estimated 2.3 million people living with HIV are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) globally, a new study by the University of Bristol and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine has found. Read More

First case of acute myelitis in a patient infected with Zika virus

A first case of acute myelitis following infection with Zika virus has been reported for the first time by a research team from Inserm Unit 1127 Brain and Spinal Cord Institute (Inserm/CNRS/Sorbonne University) and neurologists at Pointe-à-Pitre University Hospital and the University of the Anti... Read More

Serratia and cereal?

I drew this Serratia marcescens flower on an LB plate that solidified before covering the plate bottom. My coworker took a picture and ended up with this addition when she put it on Snapchat. A fun connection between the blood-red bacteria and cereal grains is that it is an explanation of blood ... Read More

BacterioFiles 242 - Corporeal Communities Create Characterizing Codes

This episode: Features of the microbial communities of people's bodies could be used to identify individuals!


(11.3 MB, 12.3 minutes)


Show notes: 
Commenta... Read More

TWiV 379: A mouse divided

Hosts: Vincent RacanielloDickson DespommierAlan Dove Read More

Center of fungal colony

Close up of the center of an unknown mold colony seen on TSA, presumably an airborne contaminant. The center is raised and "fluffy" with spore formation seen around it. Read More

Classic Spotlights: Penicillin for the masses

The Journal of Bacteriology is celebrating its centennial this year – one hundred years of valuable scientific discoveries! To illustrate the wide variety of noteworthy results published over the years, the journal is publishing a Classic Spotlight series, in which experts in the field highlight... Read More

Study offers clearest picture yet of how HIV defeats a cellular defender

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A new study offers the first atomic-scale view of an interaction between the HIV capsid - the protein coat that shepherds HIV into the nucleus of human cells - and a host protein known as cyclophilin A. This interaction is key to HIV infection, researchers say. Read More

Zika virus infects human neural stem cells

The Zika virus infects a type of neural stem cell that gives rise to the brain's cerebral cortex, Johns Hopkins and Florida State researchers report March 4 in Cell Stem Cell. On laboratory dishes, these stem cells were found to be havens for viral reproduction, resulting in cell death and/or di... Read More

Parasites help brine shrimp cope with arsenic habitat contamination

Artemia (the scientific name of the small crustacean that is also commonly known as 'sea monkey') is famous for being able to live in extreme environments and has become a model organism used to test the toxicity of chemicals in water. In addition, Artemia can produce dormant eggs, known as cyst... Read More

Novel small-molecule antiviral compound protects monkeys from deadly Ebola virus

Rhesus monkeys were completely protected from Ebola virus when treated three days after infection with a compound that blocks the virus's ability to replicate. These encouraging preclinical results suggest the compound, known as GS-5734, should be further developed as a potential treatment, acco... Read More

Register now for final FREE Mysterious Microbes webinar on Mar 10

Join Noah Fierer, CU Assoc. Professor & CIRES Fellow, as he shares insights from his team's explorations into the distribution and roles of microscopic organisms in diverse environments, including our homes. Noah will discuss how the location, occupants, and house design shapes the types of micr... Read More

Testing the evolution of resistance by experiment

One of the hallmarks of bad science writing is the claim that any research to do with bacteria will lead to new antibiotics. In this case, however, the scientists backed up their claim. They took bacteria notorious for nosocomial infections (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and exposed them to a toxin, ... Read More

A promising Ebolavirus antiviral compound

Remember Ebolaviruses? Many people are still working on vaccines and therapeutics. Here is a very nice story on a promising antiviral compound that is very effective at preventing disease in monkeys. But it doesn't work in mice - it's degraded. You know what they say - mice lie, monkeys exaggera... Read More

Study Calls into Question Current MERS Vaccine Strategy

Washington, DC - March 1, 2016 - A new study suggests that the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) develops mutations that make the virus less virulent during an outbreak rather than more virulent. The study, published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the A... Read More
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