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Dengue fever, chikungunya: a potential vector discovered in Mayotte

IRD researchers and their partners at the French Regional Health Agency, Indian Ocean, have identified a new mosquito species in Mayotte, which could be a vector of dengue fever and chikungunya hitherto unknown. Stegomyia pia , as the scientists have named it, in fact belongs to a group of speci... Read More

Smile! New Nanotube Surface Promises Dental Implants That Heal Faster and Fight Infection

A brighter, better, longer-lasting dental implant may soon be on its way to your dentist's office. Dental implants are posts, usually made of titanium, that are surgically placed into the jawbone and topped with artificial teeth. More than dentures or bridges, implants mimic the look and feel of... Read More

The Microscopic Flash Mob

Every day we see animals migrating through the air, across plains, and in the oceans, in beautifully coordinated patterns; starlings flock together in the thousands while sardines swim together in enormous shoals. These social behaviors are important in allowing animals to socialize, avoid preda... Read More

TWiV 251: Don't kiss the camel



Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Read More

In Life, Man Immune To HIV Helped Scientists Fight Virus

Stephen Crohn, a man best known for staying alive during the early days of the AIDS epidemic, died Aug. 23 at age 66. Throughout his lifetime, the New York artist helped researchers uncover vital clues about HIV and how to stop it.

Crohn's partner was one of the first people to die from AIDS ... Read More

Antibiotics Driving Resistant Bacteria In Urban Sewers

A new study from Chicago-based researchers has found that a confluence of sewage overflows and widespread antibiotic use is causing the proliferation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in waterways around the Windy City.

Recently published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, th... Read More

Exoenzyme activity

Ms. Karen Alarcon, 3rd yr - BS Biology student from St. Paul University Quezon City, Philippines is doing an exercise on exoenzyme screening by select bacterial isolates. On the picture, bacteria on starch agar flooded with iodine was analysed for the production of exoenzyme amylase. Read More

New Spray Ends Ride for Microbes

When you peer through the smear on the screen of your smartphone, thousands of tiny microbes are staring back at you, waiting to hitch a ride on your fingertips.

Harmful microbes lurk everywhere — doorknobs and faucets, locker rooms and hospitals. It's enough to make a germophobe afraid to to... Read More

Life on Mars? Well, Maybe Not

In findings that are as scientifically significant as they are crushing to the popular imagination, NASA reported Thursday that its Mars rover, Curiosity, has deflated hopes that life could be thriving on Mars today.

The conclusion, published in the journal Science, comes from the fact that C... Read More

Interview of Dr. Zakaria Ahmed (The Shining star of Bangladesh)

I am International Outreach Coordinator of We The Microbiologist, a group to outreach the excellence and passion for Microbiology. I communicated Dr. Zakira Ahmad, for a formal interaction to discuss his excellence. I am glad beyond expectation that I had been called to his home with a warm welc... Read More

Bring Back the Lyme Vaccine (op/ed)

In August 2005 my son Alec, then 39 years old, collapsed into unconsciousness while walking his dog in the suburbs of Philadelphia. By the time he arrived at the hospital, his heart rate had slowed to 30 beats per minute. Fortunately, an experienced physician recognized that Alec was having a ca... Read More

Lanthanide munching bacteria found in volcanoes

Scientists in the Netherlands have obtained the first evidence of a lifeform dependant on rare earth metals. The work may lead to the discovery of other previously unknown lifeforms and could advance rare earth bio-mining.

We use lanthanides every day as the red colour in our televisions, to ... Read More

When bacteria fight back

Q&A with Dr. David Hooper on the rising threat from drug-resistant microbes. Read More

Auto-Brewery Syndrome: Apparently, You Can Make Beer In Your Gut #funfriday

A 61-year-old man stumbled into a Texas emergency room complaining of dizziness. Nurses ran a Breathalyzer test. The man's blood alcohol concentration was a whopping 0.37 percent, or almost five times the legal limit for driving in Texas.

There was just one hitch: The man said that he hadn't ... Read More

Scientists find life coming to Earth from space

Scientists from the University of Sheffield believe they have found life arriving to Earth from space after sending a balloon to the stratosphere.

The team, led by Professor (Hon. Cardiff and Buckingham Universities) Milton Wainwright, from the University’s Department of Molecular Biology and... Read More

Toxoplasma infection permanently shifts balance in cat-and-mouse game

The toxoplasma parasite can be deadly, causing spontaneous abortion in pregnant women or killing immune-compromised patients, but it has even stranger effects in mice.

Infected mice lose their fear of cats, which is good for both cats and the parasite, because the cat gets an easy meal and th... Read More

The Secret Life of Underground Microbes: Plant Root Microbiomes Rule the World

We often ignore what we cannot see, and yet organisms below the soil's surface play a vital role in plant functions and ecosystem well-being. These microbes can influence a plant's genetic structure, its health, and its interactions with other plants. A new series of articles in a Special Sectio... Read More

Novel Gene Discovery Could Lead to New HIV Treatments

A team of researchers led by King's College London has for the first time identified a new gene which may have the ability to prevent HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, from spreading after it enters the body.

Published in Nature today, the study is the first to identify a role for the human MX... Read More

Antibacterial products fuel resistant bacteria in streams and rivers

Triclosan – a synthetic antibacterial widely used in personal care products – is fueling the development of resistant bacteria in streams and rivers. So reports a new paper in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, which is the first to document triclosan resistance in a natural envir... Read More

Blood test can determine whether illness is caused by virus or bacteria

Researchers at Duke University say they have created a blood test that can determine whether a person's respiratory illness is caused by a bacterial infection or a virus, with over 90 percent accuracy.

What's more, the test only takes about 12 hours to get results. Current methods take severa... Read More

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