MicrobeWorld App

appsquarebannerad200x200

Microbes After Hours

MWbannerEbola

Click for more "Microbes After Hours" videos

Join MicrobeWorld

Subscribe via Email

subscribe

Featured Image

Featured Video

Ebola Virus explained

Supporters

ASM House 200X200

Blood Clots Prevent Deadly Bacterial Toxin from Spreading in Body

New research from the University of California, Davis suggests that blood clots may play an unexpected role in protecting the body from the effects of deadly bacteria.

Bacterial toxins, such as lipopolysaccharide (also known as endotoxin), can cause a variety of negative health effects includ... Read More

Harmless Gut Bacteria Turn Violent When Threatened

E. coli is one of millions of bacterial species that live in our gut. From when we are infants, E. coli dwells peacefully in the lower intestine, maintaining a give-and-take relationship with our body – it helps the gut digest food, and gets energy to live and reproduce in return.

However, th... Read More

Shenzhen Finds H7N9 Flu Virus in Markets Near Hong Kong

More people risk being sporadically infected with bird flu in China’s southern province of Guangdong, the Chinese government said after finding the virus in live poultry markets.

The Guangdong province health authority examined 70 samples from 13 live poultry markets in Shenzhen city, it said... Read More

WHO confirms H7N9 cases as labs track risks

The World Health Organization (WHO) today confirmed four recent novel H7N9 avian flu cases, as scientists revealed their latest risk assessments based on genetic monitoring and lab tests.

In a statement, the WHO said it has received reports of two infections from China's Zhejiang province, wh... Read More

Gut Bacteria Lose Their Tails to Evade Antibodies

New research reveals the complex dynamic between gut bacteria and the immune system that keeps proteins from flagellin—bacterial tails—under control.

In healthy individuals, the only thing that separates the lining of the human gut from the some 100 trillion bacterial cells in the gastrointes... Read More

Dangerous Bacteria Can Lurk Inside Nose: Study

Potentially harmful staph bacteria can lurk deep inside the nose, a small new study finds.

Researchers tested 12 healthy people and found that formerly overlooked sites deep within the nose may be reservoirs for Staphylococcus aureus, which is a major cause of disease. Nearly half of S. aureu... Read More

Lyme Disease Bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi

The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is an obligate parasite that cycles between ticks and vertebrate hosts. B. burgdorferi alters the proteins expressed on its outer surface, depending on the state of each host. Here, we used immunofluorescent antibodies to identify spirochetes th... Read More

"Touchy" Bacteria Grow Tendrils Around Flaws

A common soil-dwelling microbe appears to have a sense of touch, researchers report.

A new study finds that Bacillus mycoides, a bacterium known to science since 1842, responds to forces and curvature in the medium on which it’s growing.

The microbe’s ability to respond to subtle changes i... Read More

Salmonella Jams Signals From Bacteria-Fighting Mast Cells

A protein in Salmonella inactivates mast cells -- critical players in the body’s fight against bacteria and other pathogens -- rendering them unable to protect against bacterial spread in the body, according to researchers at Duke Medicine and Duke-National University of Singapore (Duke-NUS).

... Read More

From Friend to Foe: How Benign Bacteria Evolve Into Virulent Pathogens

Bacteria can evolve rapidly to adapt to environmental change. When the "environment" is the immune response of an infected host, this evolution can turn harmless bacteria into life-threatening pathogens. A study published on December 12 in PLOS Pathogens provides insight into how this happens.
... Read More

Chowing Down On Meat, Dairy Alters Gut Bacteria A Lot, And Quickly

Looks like Harvard University scientists have given us another reason to walk past the cheese platter at holiday parties and reach for the carrot sticks instead: Your gut bacteria will thank you.

Switching to a diet packed with meat and cheese — and very few carbohydrates — alters the trillio... Read More

Bacteria show surprising number of genetic paths to survival

A boy with cystic fibrosis develops a chronic and potentially deadly Burkholderia dolosa infection in his lungs. Varieties of genetic mutations allow some strains of the bacteria to survive the dual assaults from his immune system and antibiotics, while others perish. Eventually, the strongest m... Read More

Staph Germs Hide Out In The Hidden Recesses Of Your Nose

Otherwise innocuous bacteria can cause deadly infections when people have surgery or fall ill. To prevent trouble, patients sometimes have their bodies scrubbed clean of Staphylococcus aureus. But it doesn't always work.

That may because the germs thrive in upper recesses of the nose, far fro... Read More

Gut Bacteria Lose their Tails to Evade Antibodies

New research reveals the complex dynamic between gut bacteria and the immune system that keeps proteins from flagellin—bacterial tails—under control.

In healthy individuals, the only thing that separates the lining of the human gut from the some 100 trillion bacterial cells in the gastrointes... Read More

Pictures Considered #11. Invisible Portraits: A Microbial Art Exhibit

Getting the message out to the public that the microbial world is about much more than just diseases is a challenging topic, but one we should keep trying to improve on. There are many ways to do this, but as the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words, and most people don’t want to rea... Read More

Molecular mechanisms of resistance

The abilities of bacterial organisms to utilize the various strategies to resist antimicrobial compounds are all genetically encoded.

Intrinsic resistance is that type of resistance which is naturally coded and expressed by all (or almost all) strains of that particular bacterial species. An... Read More

Reduced glycopeptide and lipopeptide susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus and the “seesaw effect”: Taking advantage of the back door left open?

Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) constitutes approximately 50% of clinical S. aureus isolates and is most commonly the result of production of a mutated pencillin-binding protein, PBP2a, which is able to carry out essential cell wall synthesis functions while maintaining a low-affinity for... Read More

Facilitation of horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance by transformation of antibiotic-induced cell-wall-deficient bacteria

It is universally accepted that the use of antibiotics will lead to antimicrobial resistance. Traditionally, the explanation to this phenomenon was random mutation and horizontal gene transfer and amplification by selective pressure. Subsequently, a second mechanism of antibiotic-induced antimic... Read More

Clinically Important Drug-Resistant Bacteria” .

"Clinically Important Drug-Resistant Bacteria” Read More

Antibiotic resistance mechanisms of clinically important bacteria.

Antibiotic resistance mechanisms of clinically important bacteria. Read More

American Society for Microbiology
2012 1752 N Street, N.W. • Washington, DC 20036-2904 • (202) 737-3600
American Society For Microbiology © 2014   |   Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use