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Nanotechnology Against Malaria Parasites

Malaria parasites invade human red blood cells, they then disrupt them and infect others. Researchers at the University of Basel and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute have now developed so-called nanomimics of host cell membranes that trick the parasites. This could lead to novel tr... Read More

Developing global expertise in medical mycology and fungal immunology

As part of the Wellcome Trust Strategic Award for Medical Mycology and Fungal Immunology (WTSA MMFI), ten international students are awarded scholarships to complete a Masters of Research (MRes) at the University of Aberdeen, followed by a three-year PhD at any UK institution with expertise in t... Read More

Genome sequencing traces MRSA spread in high transmission setting

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections, with the largest burden of infections occurring in under-resourced hospitals. While genome sequencing has previously been applied in well-resourced clinical settings to track the spread of MRSA, transm... Read More

Injectable 3D vaccines could fight cancer and infectious diseases

New findings show programmable biomaterials can be delivered using needle injection to induce an immune response and fight deadly diseases.

One of the reasons cancer is so deadly is that it can evade attack from the body's immune system, which allows tumors to flourish and spread. Scientists ... Read More

Rhodotorula

Pictured here is Rhodotorula, a beautiful coral-colored yeast grown on Sabouraud's Dextrose Agar.

Rhodotorula species are common environmental contaminants, found naturally in air, water, soil, and other areas. This yeast rarely is a pathogen, though it can cause infections in immumocompromis... Read More

Wolbachia, DNA Methylation, and Cytoplasmic Incompatibility

Wolbachia pipientis is a worldwide bacterial parasite of arthropods that infects germline cells and manipulates host reproduction to increase the ratio of infected females, the transmitting sex of the bacteria. The most common reproductive manipulation, cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), is expre... Read More

A novel plate based method for screening DOPA / melanin producing bacteria

Team of researchers guided by Dr.Sarita G Bhat had developed a novel plate based screening technique for DOPA/melanin producing bacteria.Screening was based upon the clear zone formation on a medium suplemented with L-tyrosine.This new approach can be utilized in faster and accurate screening of... Read More

Supercomputer Modelling of a Complete Human Viral Pathogen: Poliovirus (Polio virus)

Follow the reconstruction and simulation of poliovirus using the BlueGene/Q supercomputer at the Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative. The poliovirus model is being used as a basis for understanding antiviral drugs, virus infection and helps us to learn how to model related viruses suc... Read More

Bacteria’s Game of ‘Telephone’ Foils Microbiologists’ Eavesdropping

While human families are easily illustrated as a tree, bacterial families look more like a heap of branches. Scientists are trying to trace the connections between those branches in an effort to learn more about the bacteria that harm us, and those that do not.

UConn’s Peter Gogarten and Joer... Read More

Study May Help Slow the Spread of Flu

An important study conducted in part at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory may lead to new, more effective vaccines and medicines by revealing detailed information about how a flu antibody binds to a wide variety of flu viruses.

The flu virus infects millions of p... Read More

Viral genomes in 700 year old caribou scat

Recovering viral genomes from ancient specimens can provide information about viral evolution, but not many old nucleic acids have been identified. A study of 700 year old caribou feces reveals that viruses can be protected for long periods of time – under the right conditions. Read More

Who Made That Flavor? Maybe A Genetically Altered Microbe

For practically our whole history of cooking and eating, we've gotten our spices and most flavors (not to mention all of the other basic nutrients that keep us alive) straight from plants.

But researchers and biotech companies are starting to produce some of these nutrients and flavors — espe... Read More

Rapid Ebola Test Is Focus of NIH Grant to Rutgers Scientist

The test would quickly diagnose patients in remote locations where disease spread has been rampant.

Rutgers researcher David Alland, working with the California biotechnology company Cepheid, has received a grant of nearly $640,000 from the National Institutes of Health to develop a rapid tes... Read More

UEA research could revolutionise genomic sequencing of drug-resistant bacteria

New nanopore DNA sequencing technology on a device the size of a USB stick could be used to diagnose infection - according to new research from the University of East Anglia and Public Health England.

Researchers tested the new technology with a complex problem – determining the cause of anti... Read More

christmas microbiology

The tree with E. coli (red), K. pneumoniae (green) and Proteus mirabilis (brown) in chromoagar orientation. Read More

Ebola Infections Fewer Than Predicted by Disease Models

A few months ago the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicted that up to 1.4 million people in Liberia and Sierra Leone could become infected with Ebola by mid-January. In a recent address to the Senate, CDC director Tom Frieden said that worst-case scenario would not pan out.
... Read More

Promising compound rapidly eliminates malaria parasite

An international research collaborative has determined that a promising anti-malarial compound tricks the immune system to rapidly destroy red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite but leave healthy cells unharmed. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists led the study, which ap... Read More

All the microbes of the field will clap their hands

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: microbes are everywhere, and everywhere important. As regular readers will know, I’ve recently become obsessed with cultivating our microbial companions to make delicious foods. But you don’t have to have to constantly minding jars of kraut or jugs of m... Read More

Terminal Proteins: Crossing the Border

A variety of Bacteria, Archaea, and mobile genetic elements replicate their DNA as a linear chromosome using terminal proteins (TPs) to prime DNA synthesis, thus solving their end replication problem. As described in an earlier post, phage φ29 uses its TPs to also organize the sites of DNA repli... Read More

BacterioFiles 194 - Squirrel Sequence Stops Similar Sickness

This episode: Remnants of viral infection left behind in squirrels' genome may protect them from incoming viruses!


(9.3 MB, 10.1 minutes)


Show notes: 
Jou... Read More

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