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Movie Aims to Inspire College Students With Tales of Successful Minority Scientists

A student produced documentary, "Roots to Stem: Spelman Women in Science, profiles the careers of African American female scientists.

Even though there is an increasing rate of African American women in science undergraduate sciences classes, the number of these women actually entering into ... Read More

Airline routes help predict where disease will spread

Air travel doesn't pose extra risks for individuals, infectious disease experts say, but it does spread diseases between populations.

Passengers may worry viruses will spread around planes in recirculated air, but that isn't a concern thanks to the high efficiency particulate filters that cat... Read More

Study Shows College Students Are Not Following CDC Recommendations to Help Protect Themselves from H1N1 and Other Threatening Germs

Thousands of bacteria lurk in college dormitories, but students are not following proper hygiene routines to help protect themselves from serious illness, according to a study released today from the Simmons College Center for Hygiene and Health in Home and Community, sponsored by an educational... Read More

Feds draft plan to help protect bats from deadly white-nose syndrome

Since its discovery in January 2007 the lethal fungal infection known as white-nose syndrome (WNS) has killed at many as 1.5 million bats in the U.S. Northeast. Now, as temperatures start to drop this autumn into the range where WNS operates at its optimal killing capacity, the U.S. Fish & Wildl... Read More

How a tiny bug slew T. rex

A trip to the dentist could perhaps have saved many a mighty Tyrannosaurus rex.

Holes found in the jawbones of 10 T. Rex – including "Sue" at the Field Museum in Chicago – may not be battle scars from fighting with rivals as previously thought. The holes are more consistent with parasitic inf... Read More

Salmonella sp. colonies

Salmonella sp. colonies on XLD media Read More

Evolutionary Origins Of Prion Disease Gene Uncovered

A University of Toronto-led team has uncovered the evolutionary ancestry of the prion gene, which may reveal new understandings of how the prion protein causes diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as "mad cow disease."

Diseased prion proteins are responsible for... Read More

Saudi Arabia: Pilgrims Who Travel to Mecca This Fall Will Get an Oral Polio Vaccine on Arrival

Saudi Arabia has announced that everyone arriving for the annual pilgrimage to Mecca in November will have to swallow a dose of oral polio vaccine under the eyes of health officials.

The kingdom has become more and more aggressive in its fight against polio, which has hovered on the brink of ... Read More

Essay: Pregnancy Is No Time to Refuse a Flu Shot

Pregnant women are deluged with advice about things to avoid: caffeine, paint, soft cheese, sushi. Even when evidence of possible harm is weak or purely theoretical, the overriding caveat is, “Don’t take it, don’t use it, don’t do it.”

In a few contexts, the admonition is warranted; in most, ... Read More

Biofuel to be Made from Tuberculosis Bacteria

A team of researchers at MIT are engineering a strain of bacteria, which is similar to the type that causes tuberculosis, to produce biofuel.

The researchers say that the bacteria are useful because they are hungry for a number of sugars and toxic compounds and produce lipids that can be conv... Read More

Probiotics: Looking Underneath the Yogurt Label

When the label tells you the food you are buying “contains probiotics,” are you getting health benefits or just marketing hype? Perhaps a bit of both.

Probiotics are live micro-organisms that work by restoring the balance of intestinal bacteria and raising resistance to harmful germs. Taken i... Read More

Where the Worst Germs Lurk

They lurk on the kitchen sponge, your computer keyboard and the dirty laundry. Flush the toilet and they become airborne. Strangers leave them behind on airplanes, gas pumps, shopping carts, coffeeshop counters and elevator buttons. Your desktop, office microwave handles, and the exercise bike a... Read More

Diverse fish reduce coral disease

Coral reefs where lots of different kinds of fish swim are healthier than overfished ones, scientists have shown.

Researchers showed a reduced incidence of coral disease in areas of the Philippines where fishing is banned, compared with neighbouring areas.

They conclude that some types of ... Read More

Borrelia vincenti strain N19

Electron micrograph of Borrelia vincenti strain N19 Read More

Light, Photosynthesis Help Bacteria Invade Fresh Produce

Exposure to light and possibly photosynthesis itself could be helping disease-causing bacteria to be internalized by lettuce leaves, making them impervious to washing, according to research published in the October issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

Salmonella enteri... Read More

The Naming Of Cronobacter Sakazakii


Enterobacter sakazakii, a gram-negative bacillus, is a rare cause of bloodstream and central nervous system infections. In 2007, following extensive study, it was proposed that the original taxonomy of Enterobacter sakazakii be revised, to consist of five new species moved to a new genus, ide... Read More

Healthy Pet, Healthy You (MWV32)

Animal, human and environmental health are inexorably intertwined. Diseases are making the jump from animals to humans and vice-versa at an increasing pace. The emergence of animal borne diseases such as Avian flu, Ebola, and most recently H1N1 (swine flu), demonstrate the need for an integra... Read More

Don’t Blame Flu Shots for All Ills, Officials Say

As soon as swine flu vaccinations start next month, some people getting them will drop dead of heart attacks or strokes, some children will have seizures and some pregnant women will miscarry.

But those events will not necessarily have anything to do with the vaccine. That poses a public rela... Read More

Detailed Glimpse Of Chemoreceptor Architecture In Bacterial Cells

Using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, a team led by researchers from Caltech has for the first time visualized and described the precise arrangement of chemoreceptors—the receptors that sense and respond to chemical stimuli—in bacteria. In addition, they have found that this spe... Read More

HIV’s Ancestors May Have Plagued First Mammals

The retroviruses which gave rise to HIV have been battling it out with mammal immune systems since mammals first evolved around 100 million years ago – about 85 million years earlier than previously thought, scientists now believe.

The remains of an ancient HIV-like virus have been discovered... Read More

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