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Previous Seasonal Flu Infections May Provide Some Level of H1N1 Immunity

Researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology and colleagues have found that previous influenza infections may provide at least some level of immunity to the H1N1 "swine" flu."

The question we asked was, 'Is the swine flu more like the seasonal flu or like a totally new strai... Read More

Bacterial 'Ropes' Tie Down Shifting Southwest

Researchers from Arizona State University have discovered that several species of microbes (cyanobacteria), at least one found prominently in the deserts of the Southwest, have evolved the trait of rope-building to lasso shifting soil substrates.

The study, published Nov. 17 in the journal Pu... Read More

Vaccine Against Chlamydia Not Far Away

When a woman becomes infected with Chlamydia, the first white blood cells that arrive at the scene to fight the infection are not the most effective. This is shown by a thesis from the Sahlgrenska Academy. This discovery could pave the way for the relatively rapid development of a vaccine agains... Read More

Viral disease is killing the koala

The koala, Australia's star symbol, is dying of stress.

Koalas live in the rolling hills and flat plains where eucalyptus trees grow, because they need the leaves for both food and water. But as people move in, koalas are finding fewer trees, researchers say. As a result, the stress is bringi... Read More

Twittering the student experience (aka Microblogging Microbiology)

Alan Cann, senior lecturer at the University of Leicester, and colleagues Jo Badge, Stuart Johnson and Alex Moseley, have just published an article/paper on a small experiment involving student use of the microbloging service Twitter and its role in academia. Specifically, Cann and colleagues lo... Read More

Watching Lyme disease-causing microbes move in ticks

Lyme disease is caused by the microbe Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted to humans from feeding ticks. Justin Radolf and colleagues, at the University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, have now visualized the microbe moving through the feeding tick and determined that it has a bi... Read More

Renewed Hope for an AIDS Vaccine

The long search for an AIDS vaccine has produced countless false starts and repeated failed trials, casting once bright hopes into shadows of disenchantment. The now familiar swings appeared in high relief this past fall, with news of the most recent, phase III trial in Thailand. Initial fanfare... Read More

New Study Uncovers Key Role of Bacteria in the Formation of ‘Red Tide’ Algal Blooms

According to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, NOAA and NOAA-funded university scientists are closer to understanding why “red tides,” called harmful algal blooms form. These toxic harmful algal blooms threaten marine ecosystems, human health, and cost loc... Read More

Colony of Streptomyces

Colony of Streptomyces (sp.) on Sabouraud's dextrose agar, incubated at 30C Read More

Can a Person Contract Two Colds at One Time?

The rhinovirus that causes most cases of the common cold comes in many strains — at least 99, to be exact. As a result, it has long been theorized that a person could be sickened with more than one cold strain at the same time. But recent studies of the common cold and its behavior in the human ... Read More

No-Entry Zones For AIDS Virus

The AIDS virus inserts its genetic material into the genome of the infected cell. Scientists of the German Cancer Research Center have now shown for the first time that the virus almost entirely spares particular sites in the human genetic material in this process. This finding may be useful for... Read More

University of Kansas researchers harvest fuel from sewage

"University of Kansas researchers are working to turn microbes from treated sewage into a commercially viable biofuel, fluid that one day could be used to power the nation's cars, trucks, airplanes and other modes of transportation.

But for now, the future grows in four farm tanks at Lawrence... Read More

Online gangs cash in on swine flu

Criminal gangs are making millions of dollars out of the H1N1 flu pandemic by selling fake flu drugs over the internet, a web security firm said on Monday.

Sophos, a British security software firm said it had intercepted hundreds of millions of fake pharmaceutical spam adverts and websites th... Read More

Scientists put interactive flu tracking at public's fingertips

COLUMBUS, Ohio – New methods of studying avian influenza strains and visually mapping their movement around the world will help scientists more quickly learn the behavior of the pandemic H1N1 flu virus, Ohio State University researchers say.

The researchers linked many powerful computer syste... Read More

Google Flu Trends

Each week, millions of users around the world search for health information online. Google has found a close relationship between how many people search for flu-related topics and how many people actually have flu symptoms. Of course, not every person who searches for "flu" is actually sick, but... Read More

Biotorrents

BioTorrents.net is a web service built by Dr. Morgan G.I. Langille, a bioinformatics researcher at UC Davis Genome Center, that allows scientists to rapidly share their results, datasets, and software using BitTorrent P2P file sharing technology.

Some of the service's features include:

Re... Read More

Bangladesh mass poisoning mystery solved

One of the world's great poisoning mysteries may have been solved – the source of the arsenic that turns up in lethal quantities in hundreds of thousands of wells across Bangladesh. The answer is ponds.

Bangladesh occupies the flood-prone delta of the river Ganges. In the past half-century, v... Read More

VIDEO - Immune Cell Tracking a Chemical Scent

An addendum to the earlier article "Scientists Guide Immune Cells with Light and Microparticles," this is a video of an immune cell following the allur... Read More

Scientists Guide Immune Cells with Light and Microparticles

A team led by Yale University scientists has developed a new approach to studying how immune cells chase down bacteria in our bodies. Their findings are described in the November 15 issue of Nature Methods Advanced Online Publication.

When bacteria enter our bodies they secrete molecules, lea... Read More

Glowing bugs could find landmines

Bacteria which glow green in the presence of explosives could provide a cheap and safe way to find hidden landmines, Edinburgh scientists claim. The bugs can be mixed into a colourless solution, which forms green patches when sprayed onto ground where mines are buried.

Edinburgh University sa... Read More

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