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AIDS virus in cats might help human vaccine effort

Cats may hold a key to developing an HIV vaccine for people, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that a protein from the virus that causes AIDS in cats triggered an immune response in blood from HIV-infected people. The virus that causes AIDS in people is called the human immunodeficiency... Read More

The Government Shuts Down And The Microbes Win

The shutdown of the US government has many repercussions that are almost immeasurable and hit US citizens from every direction. But a quartet of them stands out for their potential to pose a threat to public health because they’ll allow microbes to gain footholds as our defenses against them fal... Read More

Oral Bacteria Found in Alzheimer’s Tissue

A particular type of oral bacteria has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study conducted by an international team of researchers.

They believe that the bacterium found in the brain can trigger immune system responses and pathological changes, which could lead to diseases ... Read More

Rare seawater 'flesh-eating' bacteria kills 35 a year

The death last week of a Florida man from an uncommon flesh-eating bacterium was the state's ninth so far this year.

The bacterium is in the same family as those that cause cholera.

Henry Konietzky, 59, of Palm Coast, Fla., died Sept. 23 after setting crab traps two days earlier in the riv... Read More

UF researchers report cats may be the key to human HIV vaccine

Blood from HIV-infected human subjects shows an immune response against a cat AIDS virus protein, a surprise finding that could help scientists find a way to develop a human AIDS vaccine, report University of Florida and University of California, San Francisco researchers.

Their findings appe... Read More

Rutgers Scientists Discover Molecules that Show Promise for New Anti-Flu Medicines

A new way to attack flu viruses is taking shape in laboratories at Rutgers University, where scientists have identified chemical agents that block the virus’s ability to replicate itself in cell culture.

These novel compounds show promise for a new class of antiviral medicines to fight much-f... Read More

Critical tool for brain research derived from 'pond scum'

The poster child for basic research might well be a one-celled green algae found in ordinary lakes and ponds. Amazingly, this unassuming creature—called Chlamydomonas—is helping scientists solve one of the most complex and important mysteries of science: How billions of neurons in the brain inte... Read More

Important step-forward in mission to tackle parasitic worm infections

Gastrointestinal parasitic infections, which are worm infections in the intestine, affect nearly one quarter of the world population and have been heavily linked with poverty in poorer regions.

They normally result in a chronic, long-lived infection associated with poor quality of life and he... Read More

How an Aggressive Fungal Pathogen Causes Mold in Fruits and Vegetables

A research team led by a molecular plant pathologist at the University of California, Riverside has discovered the mechanism by which an aggressive fungal pathogen infects almost all fruits and vegetables.

The team discovered a novel “virulence mechanism” — the mechanism by which infection ta... Read More

UC Riverside research has large implications for controlling insect-born diseases worldwide

Insects are repelled by N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide, also known as DEET. But exactly which olfactory receptors insects use to sense DEET has eluded scientists for long.

Now researchers at the University of California, Riverside have identified these DEET-detecting olfactory receptors that cause ... Read More

Key Mechanism Behind Herpes Revealed

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have for the first time managed to measure the internal pressure that enables the herpes virus to infect cells in the human body. The discovery paves the way for the development of new medicines to combat viral infections. The results indicate good chance... Read More

Spectacular Microscopic Art Is Also World-Changing Science

Fernan Federici’s microscopic images of plants, bacteria, and crystals are a classic example of finding art in unexpected places.

A couple years ago, Federici was working on his Ph.D. in biological sciences at Cambridge University studying self-organization, the process by which things organi... Read More

A microbe's fountain of youth

The yeast S.pombe is one of the best-studied microbes in the world. First isolated from East African millet beer over a century ago, it's been used as a model organism in molecular and cell biology for the past sixty years. And yet scientists have now just uncovered what may be its most striking... Read More

Scientists Discuss The Reality Of A Zombie Apocalypse: Exclusive

Hollywood has amplified the idea of a zombie apocalypse for a long time, and the stories have grown increasingly popular in pop culture, particularly due to TV shows like ‘The Walking Dead‘ and movies like ‘World War Z.’

However, when you take science fiction out of the equation and add real-... Read More

Poop pill may treat stubborn, deadly C. diff bacteria

Transplanting fecal matter has been one of the best remedies at treating a tough bacterial infection known as Clostridium difficile (C. diff). Scientists are now saying they can give all the benefits of poop in a tiny pill.

This new pill method is a less yucky way to do "fecal transplants." A... Read More

Some Observations on the Transformation of Self

Artist Anne Brodie, Microbiologist Dr Simon Park and Curator Dr Caterina Albano collaborated in researching the communication and light producing properties of bioluminescent bacteria outside of the usual confines of pure scientific practice. Over the course of 2009 and 2010 we developed a body ... Read More

Some Observations on the Transformation of Self

Artist Anne Brodie, Microbiologist Dr Simon Park and Curator Dr Caterina Albano collaborated in researching the communication and light producing properties of bioluminescent bacteria outside of the usual confines of pure scientific practice. Over the course of 2009 and 2010 we developed a body ... Read More

Media. Green and blue water colour and Serratia marcescens (red)

This is a joint project with water color artist Sarah Roberts to study the interaction of bacteria with traditional water colors. Many different types of bacteria have been assessed but only two so far, can be said to paint. When the white pigmented bacterium Proteus mirabilis, and the red Serra... Read More

TWiM #65: Leanness is transmissible

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Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Michele Swanson.


Vincent and M... Read More

TWiM 65 Letters

Alexandra writes:


Dear TWIM-ers,


When I began listening to TWIV almost a year ago, I had just switched majors from philosophy to biology. I am now writing to you good people at TWIM at the end of my first undergraduate summer research gig, where I have had qui... Read More

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